[ source: Flickr ]

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Previously asked Bayreuth questions and answers:

Here is a list of Bayreuth questions that were already answered by our local residents and property owners. Please browse through them. In case you still have a question that is not answered here please use the form above.

Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

"what is to do in December , we will be staying there for the month" (posted 07/19/2015)

You can move from here in December the Christmas markets in Nuremberg Kindels accessible (1 hour by car), Forchheim (30 min. By car), Bayreuth (15 min. By car). Skiing in Fichtelgebirge (30 min. By car). Therme Obernsees here at the location (15 min. To Bayreuth). Various attractions, museums and exhibitions in Nuremberg, Bamberg (30 min. By car), Kulmbach (20 min. By car). Basilica (by Balthasar Neumann) in Gossweinstein (15 min. By car), basilica "Vierzehnheiligen" (also from Balthasar Neumannn) us "Kloster Banz" in Lichtenfels (1 hour by car). Sincerely Johann Stefan
Answer provided by Johann Stefan on 07/19/2015
This answer is helpful
Since the interests of the tourists are very different, I refer to the calendar of events, in which you select oh interests kannn.http: //www.region-bayreuth.de/Aktuelles/Veranstaltungskalender.aspx As besoderes are in December the Christmas markets in div. call to the region. Sincerely Bernd Klein Worth
Answer provided by Walburga Kleinworth on 07/20/2015
This answer is helpful
Good day, in December the Fichtelgebirge is as reizvoll.Viel nature, skiing, hiking or many points of nourishing environment erkunden.Bummeln in historic cities, or theater, museums or regional events besuchen.Es is something for every taste dabei.Sie be not be bored. Our apartment Wildenreuth is at the moment the whole of December frei.Über your interest we will be happy and remain with best regards Kerstin & Klaus Mauermann
Answer provided by Kerstin Mauermann on 07/20/2015
This answer is helpful

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

"Hello, Is it possible to get any information about Bayreuth concentration camp (subcamp of the Flossenbürg camp). Any chance to visit it? Kind regards, Dr Milan Lomsky" (posted 02/19/2015)

If you go to Google and type in "concentration camp outside Bayreuth" You get detailed answer. Sincerely Johann Stefan PS .: I am from Hungary. We fled in 1947. I was eight years old.
Answer provided by Johann Stefan on 02/19/2015
This answer is helpful

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Bayreuth

  • Margravial Opera House
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Margravial Opera House

    The Margravial Opera House (German: Markgräfliches Opernhaus) or Margrave's Opera House is a Baroque opera house in the town of Bayreuth, Germany, built between 1744 and 1748 by Joseph Saint-Pierre (de). It is one of Europe's few surviving theatres of the period and has been extensively restored. The interior was designed by Giuseppe Galli Bibiena and his son Carlo of Bologna in the late Baroque style. Princess Wilhelmine of Prussia (the older sister of Frederick the Great), wife of the Frederick, Margrave of Brandenburg-Bayreuth, participated here as writer, player, composer, actor and director. Today she features in a sound-and-light presentation for tourists.

    The stage's great depth (27 metres) attracted Richard Wagner, who later had his Bayreuth Festspielhaus built north of the town.

    Each September from the year 2000 to 2009, the theatre hosted the Bayreuther Baroque festival, with performances of early operatic rarities. The 2009 festival included performances of Andrea Bernasconi's festa teatrale, L'Huomo, to a libretto by the Margravine Wilhelmine.

    On 30 June 2012 the opera house was inscribed in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

    The theatre is closed since August of 2012 for extensive refurbishment and redevelopment, a process which is expected to take several years to complete.

  • Bayreuth Festival
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bayreuth Festival

    The Bayreuth Festival (German: Bayreuther Festspiele) is a music festival held annually in Bayreuth, Germany, at which performances of operas by the 19th century German composer Richard Wagner are presented. Wagner himself conceived and promoted the idea of a special festival to showcase his own works, in particular his monumental cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen and Parsifal.

    Performances take place in a specially designed theatre, the Bayreuth Festspielhaus. Wagner personally supervised the design and construction of the theatre, which contained many architectural innovations to accommodate the huge orchestras for which Wagner wrote as well as the composer's particular vision about the staging of his works. The Festival has become a pilgrimage destination for Wagner enthusiasts, who often must wait years to obtain tickets.

  • Ökologisch-Botanischer Garten der Universität Bayreuth
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Ökologisch-Botanischer Garten der Universität Bayreuth

    The Ökologisch-Botanischer Garten der Universität Bayreuth (16 hectares) is a botanical garden maintained by the University of Bayreuth. It is located at Universitätsstraße 30, Bayreuth, Bavaria, Germany, and open daily except Saturday.

  • Margravial Opera House

    Margravial Opera House

    The Markgräfliches Opernhaus (Margrave's Opera House, or Margravial Opera House) is a Baroque opera house in the town of Bayreuth in Germany. It is one of Europe's few surviving theatres of the period and has been extensively restored. It was built between 1744 and 1748 by Joseph Saint-Pierre; the interior was designed by Giuseppe Galli Bibiena and his son Carlo of Bologna in the late Baroque style. Princess Wilhelmine of Prussia, wife of the Margrave Frederick, participated here as writer, player, composer, actor and director. Today she features in a sound-and-light presentation for tourists. The stage's great depth (27 metres) attracted Richard Wagner, who later had his Bayreuth Festspielhaus built north of the town.

    Each September since the year 2000, the theatre has hosted the Bayreuther Baroque festival, with performances of early operatic rarities.

    Hours: open daily April - September 9am - 6pm. October - March 10am - 4pm. Closed during the day of evening performances.

    Admission: Adults 5 €, Groups and Students 4 €, under 18 years free.

  • New Palace
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    New Palace

    After the Old Palace burned down, the new town residence for Margrave Friedrich von Brandenburg-Bayreuth was begun by Joseph Saint-Pierre in 1753. Margravine Wilhelmine had considerable influence on its final form, designing some of the rooms herself, including the Cabinet of Fragmented Mirrors and the Old Music Room with its pastel portraits of singers, actors and dancers.

    The Palm Room with its outstanding walnut panelling is a typical example of the Rococo style in Bayreuth. On the ground floor of the New Palace is a comprehensive collection of Bayreuth faience from the manufactory founded in 1716 (Rummel Collection).

    Hours: April - September daily from 9am to 6pm. October - March from 10am to 4pm (closed on Mondays).

    Admission: adults: 5 €, Groups and Students: 4 €, under 18 years free.

  • Hermitage (Eremitage) Old Palace Historical Park

    Hermitage (Eremitage) Old Palace Historical Park

    In 1715 Margrave Georg Wilhelm built the Old Palace near the residential town of Bayreuth as the central feature of a court hermitage. In 1753, when Margrave Friedrich took over the government of the margraviate, he presented the Hermitage to his wife Wilhelmine. Fascinated by this unique complex, the margravine immediately began enlarging it, first adding new rooms to the Old Palace including a Music Room, a Japanese Cabinet and the Chinese Mirror Cabinet, in which she wrote her celebrated memoirs. Between 1743 and 1745 various buildings and fountains such as the Ruined Theatre and the Lower Grotto with the hermitage of Margrave Friedrich were produced from designs by Joseph St Pierre. The New Palace and the Upper Grotto were built from 1749 to 1753.

    In the sections added by Wilhelmine to the existing gardens she introduced traditional baroque elements such as hedge gardens, pergolas and waterworks. Created in an era when there were no gardens of this type at all in Germany, the Hermitage is thus unique amongst the gardens of the 18th century.

    Hours: open daily April - September 9am - 6pm. October 1 - 15 10am - 4pm. October 16 - March 31 closed. Guided tours every 30 minutes.

    Admission: adults: 4 €, groups and students: 3 €, under 18 years admission free.

  • Richard Wagner Museum

    Richard Wagner Museum

    In 1976, to mark the centenary of the Bayreuth Festival, Villa Wahnfried was restored and opened as the Richard Wagner Museum and national archive. Wahnfried – former home of Richard Wagner – is now home to a permanent exhibition on the life and works of this great music dramatist and on the history of the Bayreuth Festival.

    Hours: April - October: 9am - 5pm., Tue. and Thur.: 9am - 8pm. November - March: 10 am - 5pm.

  • Maisels Brewery & Cooper's Museum

    Maisels Brewery & Cooper's Museum

    The most extensive brewery museum in the world, listed in the Guinness Book of Records, Maisel’s Brewery and Cooperage Museum showcases the exciting world of beer and beer-making in the original brewery building. Visitors can see a collection of more than 3,300 beer glasses and jugs and 400 rare enamel signs from various breweries and beer brands, as well as a delightfully presented collection of beer mats. With a complete brewing room dating from 1887 with steam engines and brewing equipment, a hop chamber, a barrel cellar and a bottling room, visitors can explore the various stages of the brewing process in this fully preserved brewery. Learn the secrets of a perfect pint in the cavernous Lagerkeller (storage cellars), then after the tour, enjoy a free Maisel’s Weisse wheat beer in the Alte Abfüllerei bar. Guided tours are the only way to see the museum. Group and multilingual tours on request.

  • Jean Paul Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Jean Paul Museum

    Jean Paul (Johann Paul Friedrich Richter), born 1763 in Wunsiedel, lived and worked in Bayreuth from 1804 until his death in 1825. The museum houses a remarkable collection of manuscripts, first editions, portraits, literature and pictures of and relating to Jean Paul, one of Germany's foremost writers.

    Hours: September - June: daily 10 - 12pm and 2 - 5 pm. July and August: daily 10 am - 5pm.

  • Garden Museum Fantaisie Palace and Park

    The park surrounding Schloss Fantaisie was created in the 1760s by Duchess Elisabeth Friederike Sophie von Württemberg, the daughter of Margravine Wilhelmine who had become famous for creating several gardens in the Bayreuth area, including the Eremitage Hofgarten and Sanspareil. The park was further developed by a succession of owners and therefore combines design elements from various style periods: the rococo, the sentimental landscape and the mixed style period of the 19th century. The castle houses Germany's first Garden Art Museum which is exclusively devoted to the history of German garden design of the 18th and 19th centuries, with a regional focus on southern Germany. Among the highlights is the copy of the famous inlaid cabinet by the Spindler brothers.

    Hours: April - September: 9 am - 6 pm, closed on Mondays. Oct. 1st - Oct. 15th: 10am - 4pm. Closed from Oct. 16th to March.

    Admission: Adults: 3 €.



What is your insider travel tip for Bayreuth?

Travel Insider Tips for Bayreuth

Bayreuth Overview

Bayreuth is a city in northern Bavaria, Germany, on the Red Main river in a valley between the Frankish Alb and the Fichtelgebirge. It is the capital of Upper Franconia and has a population of 73,048 citizens (2008).

Richard Wagner and Bayreuth

The city is best known for its association with the composer Richard Wagner, who lived in Bayreuth from 1872 until his death in 1883. Wagner's villa, "Wahnfried", was constructed in Bayreuth under the sponsorship of King Ludwig II of Bavaria, and was converted after World War II into a Wagner Museum. To the north of Bayreuth is the Bayreuth Festspielhaus, an opera house specially constructed for and exclusively devoted to the performance of Wagner's operas. The premieres of the final two works of Wagner's Ring Cycle; of the cycle as a whole; and of Parsifal took place here.

Every summer, Wagner's operas are performed at the Festspielhaus during the month-long Richard Wagner Festival, commonly known as the Bayreuth Festival. The Festival draws thousands of attendees each year, and has consistently been sold-out since its inauguration in 1876. Currently, waiting lists for tickets can stretch for up to 10 years or more.

Owing to Wagner's relationship with the then unknown philosopher, Friedrich Nietzsche, the first Bayreuth festival is situated as a key turning point in Nietzsche's philosophical development. Though at first an enthusiastic champion of Wagner's music, Nietzsche ultimately became hostile, viewing the festival and its revellers as symptom of cultural decay and bourgeois decadence, an event which led him to turn his eye upon the esteemed values of morality held by society as a whole. Nietzsche's book Human, All-Too-Human developed out of this experience, a summary of which appears in his late book, Ecce Homo, and where many of these concerns are expounded upon in garrulous detail.

Things to See

  • New Castle, seat of the margraves from 1753 on
  • Bayreuth Festspielhaus
  • Richard Wagner Museum (Villa Wahnfried)
  • Jean-Paul Museum
  • Franz Liszt Museum
  • Margrave's Opera House, one of the finest Baroque theatres of Europe, built in the 18th century
  • The German Masonic Museum
  • The Goldener Anker hotel
  • Baroque parks:
    • park of Eremitage and Old Castle, former seat of the margraves, outside the inner town
    • castle and park of Fantaisie, in the vicinity of Bayreuth
    • park Sanspareil, about 30 km west of Bayreuth

[ source: Wikipedia ]

More about the History of Bayreuth

The city is believed to have been founded by the Counts of Andechs (Andechs vacation rentals | Andechs travel guide) on an unknown date in the Middle Ages and was first mentioned in 1194. The city centre still possesses the typical structure of a Bavarian street market: the settlement is grouped around a road widening into a square; the Town Hall was located in the middle. The church stood apart from it and on a small hill stood the castle. Some sixty years later the town (at that time a tiny village) became subordinate to the Hohenzollern state, and when this state was divided, Bayreuth belonged to the county of Kulmbach (Kulmbach vacation rentals | Kulmbach travel guide). The city suffered several plagues and wars until in 1430 it was destroyed in the course of the Hussite Wars. In 1602 there was another plague, and fires damaged it in 1605 and 1621.

Later Bayreuth became a scene of the Nazi ideology. Nazi leaders often visited the Wagner festival and tried to turn Bayreuth into a Nazi model town. It was one of several cities in which town planning was administered directly from Berlin (Berlin vacation rentals | Berlin travel guide), due to Hitler's special interest in the town and in the festival. Hitler loved the music of Richard Wagner, and he became a close friend to Winifred Wagner after she took over the Bayreuth Festival. Hitler frequently attended Wagner performances in the Bayreuth Festspielhaus. During World War II, a subcamp of Flossenburg concentration camp was located here. Bayreuth was heavily bombed at the end of World War II. One third of the city was destroyed and about a thousand people diedAfter the war Bayreuth tried to part with its ill-fated past. The Wagner festival started again in 1951. In 1975 the University of Bayreuth was founded and largely contributed to the further growth of the town. In 1999 the world gliding championship took place at Bayreuth municipal airport.

Bayreuth is a city in northern Bavaria, Germany, on the Red Main river in a valley between the Frankish Alb and the Fichtelgebirge. It is the capital of Upper Franconia and has a population of 73,048 citizens (2008).

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