[ source: Wikipedia ]

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Popular Points of Interest in and near Brandenburg an der Havel

  • Paretz
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Paretz

    Paretz is a village in the German state of Brandenburg in the district of Havelland, west of Berlin. Recently, a district reform made Paretz into a borough of the city of Ketzin. It has a population of approximately 400. In the late 18th and early 19th centuries the village was the summer residence King Frederick William III of Prussia and of his wife Queen Louise.

    The manorial estate of Paretz was originally property of the von Bredow family from whom, in 1677, the Brandenburg diplomat Christoph Caspar von Blumenthal bought it. It was from here that his daughter Wilhelmina eloped with Ernst Christian von Weiler, a married man, in 1689. The estate was inherited by Count Hans von Blumenthal, former commander of the Gardes du Corps, who in retirement was tutor to the Crown Prince Frederick William (later King Frederick William III of Prussia).

  • Schlaube Valley Nature Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Schlaube Valley Nature Park

    Schlaube Valley Nature Park is a nature park and reserve in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It covers an area of 225 km² (87 sq mi). It was established on December 27, 1995.

    With a surface area of 1.32 km² the Großer Müllroser See, which is flown through by the river Schlaube, is its largest lake.

  • Stechlin-Ruppiner Land Nature Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Stechlin-Ruppiner Land Nature Park

    Stechlin-Ruppiner Land Nature Park is a nature park and reserve in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It covers an area of 1,080 km². It was established on July 1, 2001. It includes Lake Stechlin, home to the endemic Stechlin cisco.

  • Uckermark Lakes Nature Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Uckermark Lakes Nature Park

    Uckermark Lakes Nature Park is a nature park and reserve in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It covers an area of 895 km² (346 sq mi). It was established on May 3 1997 and is located on the northern edge of Brandenburg state.

  • Westhavelland Nature Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Westhavelland Nature Park

    Westhavelland Nature Park is a nature park and reserve in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It covers an area of 1315 km². It was established on June 11, 1998.

  • Beetzsee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Beetzsee

    The Beetzsee is a lake in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It is situated to the north and east of the city of Brandenburg an der Havel. It consists of four lake separate lake basins, which are connected by narrow channels. The uppermost of these basins is also known as the Riewendsee.

    The lake is 22 kilometres (14 mi) long, and has a maximum depth of 9 metres (30 ft), with an average depth of 3 metres (9.8 ft).

    The lake is navigable and connects, at its southern end, to the River Havel and the Silo Canal. Navigation is administered as part of the Untere Havel–Wasserstraße.

  • Breitlingsee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Breitlingsee

    The Breitlingsee, or Breitling See, is a lake in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It is situated to the west of the city of Brandenburg an der Havel, and is one of a number of directly linked lakes, along with the Möserscher See, Plauer See, Quenzsee and Wendsee.

    The lake has a surface area of 5.13 square kilometres (1.98 sq mi).

    The navigable River Havel flows through the lake, entering from the east and exiting directly into the Plauer See. Navigation is administered as part of the Untere Havel–Wasserstraße.

  • Ellbogensee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Ellbogensee

    Ellbogensee (literally Elbow Lake) is a lake in the Mecklenburg Lake District, in Germany. Whilst most of the lake is in the district of Mecklenburgische Seenplatte in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, a portion of its southern shore is in the state of Brandenburg. It has a distinctive shape, reflecting its name.

    The lake has an elevation of 54.8 metres (180 ft) and a surface area of 1.55 square kilometres (0.60 sq mi).

    The navigable River Havel flows through the Ellbogensee, entering it at Priepert via a 0.6 kilometres (0.37 mi) long channel from the Großer Priepertsee to the north, and exiting via a 0.3 kilometres (0.19 mi) long channel to the Ziernsee to the east. At Strasen, at the western end of the lake, a canal and lock gives access to the Großer Pälitzsee, forming the first link of the Müritz–Havel–Wasserstraße. Navigation is administered as part of the Obere–Havel–Wasserstraße.

  • Plauer See (Brandenburg)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Plauer See (Brandenburg)

    Plauer See is a lake in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It is situated to the west of the city of Brandenburg an der Havel, and is one of a number of directly linked lakes, along with the Breitlingsee, Möserscher See, Quenzsee and Wendsee.

    The lake has a surface area of 6.4 square kilometres (2.5 sq mi), and has a maximum depth of 6.7 metres (22 ft).

    The navigable River Havel flows through the lake, entering from directly from the Breitlingsee, and exiting downstream at Plaue. The Elbe–Havel Canal connects to the River Havel in the Plauer See, having transited the Wendsee. The Silo Canal bypasses a stretch of upstream Havel and enters the Plauer See via the Quenzsee. Navigation is administered as part of the Untere Havel–Wasserstraße.

  • Quenzsee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Quenzsee

    Quenzsee is a lake in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It is situated to the west of the city of Brandenburg an der Havel, and is one of a number of directly linked lakes, along with the Breitlingsee, Möserscher See, Plauer See and Wendsee.

    The lake has a surface area of 68 hectares (170 acres), and has a maximum depth of 3 metres (9.8 ft).

    The lake is navigable and has direct access to the Plauer See, and hence the River Havel, at its western end. The Silo Canal enters the lake at its eastern end. Navigation is administered as part of the Untere Havel–Wasserstraße.

  • Stolpsee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Stolpsee

    Stolpsee is a lake in the Mecklenburg Lake District, in Germany. It is situated in the district of Oberhavel in the state of Brandenburg. The resort of Himmelpfort lies on the north bank of the lake.

    The lake has an approximate length of 3.6 kilometres (2.2 mi) and a width of 1.42 kilometres (0.88 mi). It has a surface area of 371 hectares (920 acres) and is situated at an altitude of 52 metres (171 ft) above sea level.

    The navigable River Havel flows through the lake, entering it via a 2.4 kilometres (1.5 mi) channel from the Schwedtsee. The Stolpsee is the lowest of the chain of lakes within the Mecklenburg Lake District that the river flows through, and on exit the river flows for some 90 kilometres (56 mi) before reaching the next lake, the Tegeler See on the outskirts of Berlin. Navigation is administered as part of the Obere–Havel–Wasserstraße.

    The Stolpsee is also linked to the Hausee via a short canal and lock at Himmelpfort, forming the first link of the Lychener Gewässer that provides navigable access to the town of Lychen.

  • Wannsee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Wannsee

    Wannsee is a locality in the southwestern Berlin borough of Steglitz-Zehlendorf, Germany. It is the westernmost locality of Berlin. In the quarter there are two lakes, the larger Großer Wannsee (Greater Wannsee) and the Kleiner Wannsee (Little Wannsee), are located on the river Havel and are separated only by the Wannsee bridge. The larger of the two lakes covers an area of 2.7 km2 (1.0 sq mi) and has a maximum depth of 9 m (30 ft).

  • Wendsee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Wendsee

    Wendsee is a lake in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It is situated to the west of the city of Brandenburg an der Havel, and is one of a number of directly linked lakes, along with the Breitlingsee, Möserscher See, Plauer See and Quenzsee.

    The lake has a surface area of 80 hectares (200 acres), and has a maximum depth of 4.9 metres (16 ft).

    The lake is navigable and has direct access to the Plauer See, and hence the River Havel, at its eastern end, where it is spanned by the Seegartenbrücke. The Elbe–Havel Canal enters the lake at its western end. A short navigable channel also links the southern end of the Wendsee to the Wusterwitzer See. Navigation is administered as part of the Elbe–Havel Canal.



What is your insider travel tip for Brandenburg an der Havel?

Travel Insider Tips for Brandenburg an der Havel

Brandenburg an der Havel Overview

Brandenburg an der Havel is a town in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It is located on the banks of the Havel river. Population: 74,129 (December 31, 2005).

Although the town of Brandenburg is less known than the state of Brandenburg, it provided the name for the medieval Bishopric of Brandenburg, the Margravate of Brandenburg, and the current state of Brandenburg. Today it is a small town compared to nearby Berlin (Berlin vacation rentals | Berlin travel guide), but once it was the origin of the realms of Brandenburg and Prussia.

Things to See in Brandenburg an der Havel

The Dominsel (Cathedral Island) is the historic heart of the town. Here stands its oldest edifice: the Dom St. Peter und Paul (Cathedral of Saint Peter and Saint Paul). Although construction began in the Romanesque style in 1165, it was completed as a Gothic cathedral during the 14th century. While the exterior is rather austere, the cathedral surprises the visitor with its sumptuous interior, especially the painted vault of the Bunte Kapelle (Coloured Chapel)

The Katharinenkirche (St. Catherine's church) built in 1401 in the Neustadt is an impressive example of northern German brick Gothic architecture. The Gotthardkirche (St. Gotthard's church) was built of the same material just a few years later.

Another interesting building is the Altstädtische Rathaus (Old Town Hall), a late Gothic brick building with stepped gables and an ornate portal. In front of it stands a 5.35m high statue of the knight Roland. Made in sandstone, the statue was erected in 1474 as the sign of the town's independence.

There is also a part of Brandenburg's medieval city wall, with four preserved watchtowers: the Steintorturm and the Mühlentorturm (in Newtown), and the Rathenower Torturm and the Plauer Torturm (in Oldtown).

The Brandenburg Industrial Museum is an Anchor Point of ERIH, The European Route of Industrial Heritage.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Brandenburg an der Havel

The castle of Brandenburg, which had been a fortress of the Slavic tribe Stodoranie, was conquered in 929 by King Henry the Fowler. The town remained German only until 983, when a Slavic rebellion was successful. During the next 170 years the area was ruled by Slavic princes of the Hevelles tribe. The last of them, Pribislav, died in 1150. Afterwards Albert I settled here and became the first margrave of Brandenburg. The town was restricted to the western bank of the Havel until 1196, when it was extended to the eastern side. The parts on either side of the river were regarded as three different towns (Old Town, New Town and Brandenburg cathedral district) for centuries.

In 1314-1315 the Old and New Towns joined the Hanseatic League. In the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648) the towns suffered plundering and destruction which led to a loss of power; Potsdam became the new capital, and the court left the town of Brandenburg. In 1715 Old Town and New Town were merged to form a single town. In 1928 the Brandenburg cathedral district was added.

In the late 19th century Brandenburg an der Havel became a very important industrial center in the German Empire. Steel industries settled there, and several world famous bicycle brands such as Brennabor, Corona and Excelsior were manufactured in the city. A world famous toy industry was also established. With an giant industrial complex, the Deutsche Reichsbahn (German Imperial Railways) was located in Brandenburg-Kirchmöser during the time between the two world wars and the time of the former GDR. The city's excellent infrastructure was a big advantage: the city is located at the junction of Federal Highways 1 and 102, the Autobahn A2 is nearby, the river Havel and the Silo canal serve as European Waterways. The railroad connection between Berlin and Magdeburg also runs through Brandenburg an der Havel.

A concentration camp, one of the first in Germany, was located on Nikolaiplatz in Brandenburg Old Town. After closing this inner city concentration camp, the Nazis used the Brandenburg-Görden prison, located in Görden, a suburb of Brandenburg. In the Nikolaiplatz camp, the Nazis killed people with mental diseases, including children. They called this action "T4" because of the Berlin address Tiergartenstraße 4, the HQ of this planned and well-organized killing "Euthanasia" organisation. Brandenburg an der Havel was one of the very first locations in the Third Reich where the Nazis experimented with killing their victims by gas. Here they prepared the mass killings in Auschwitz and other devastation camps. After complaints by local inhabitants about the smoke, the mobile furnaces used to burn the corpses ceased operation. Shortly after this the Nazis closed the old prison.

Friedrich Fromm, a German officer involved in the July 20 plot to assassinate Hitler, was executed here in February 1945 for his part in the plot, even though Fromm betrayed those conspirators he knew and ordered their execution.

After the fall of the Berlin Wall the city's population declined from over 100,000 in 1989 to roughly 75,000 in 2005 through emigration. The migration was mainly by young people. As a result the future of the city is uncertain.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Brandenburg an der Havel is a town in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It is located on the banks of the Havel river. Although the town of Brandenburg is less known than the state of Brandenburg, it provided the name for the medieval Bishopric of Brandenburg, the Margravate of Brandenburg, and the current state of Brandenburg. Today it is a small town compared to nearby Berlin, but once it was the origin of the realms of Brandenburg and Prussia.

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