[ source: Wikipedia ]

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Previously asked Chemnitz questions and answers:

Here is a list of Chemnitz questions that were already answered by our local residents and property owners. Please browse through them. In case you still have a question that is not answered here please use the form above.

Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

"My daughter and I will be in Germany in May 2015. My great grandfather was from Chemnitz. We might have time to take a train from Dresden to Chemnitz and spend a short time ( we will need to be back by 17:00 ). Are there any records from the 1800's available-church, courthouse? Also we would like to see the city's historic sights. Would it be best to hire a taxi? I read that there is a good transit system, but we will have limited time, Thank you for any help you can give us. Sincerely, Paulette Kattula Kent, WA USA" (posted 10/24/2014)

In Chemnitz very much beautiful old structure was destroyed during the war, unfortunately. However, it is worth the Kaßberg to visit (one of the largest Art Nouveau and founder of Time-fourths of Germany). Also, the Brühl (adjacent to the railway station, a few minutes walk) is again under construction and historically impressive. The Lutheran Church (in Lutherviertel) is a very beautiful old church, if you want to see churches. Any others worth visiting the castle Chemnitz. The district around the castle and the castle pond. There's also worth stopping off for lunch. For example, in the basement of the house on Castle Hill. The Schlossberg served to the city's beginnings as a supply for the castle (it stayed there so all Bediensten who worked during the day at the castle but in the evening and went home, not living as servants in the castle). So worth seeing and in a logical order: first Brühl (within a 10 min walk from the station) 2 Schlosschemnitz (also less than 20 minutes from Brühl on foot, by taxi at most 5min) then -there lunch www.kellerhaus-Chemnitz. de 3 Kassberg (best by bus, taxi or even boot-it is quite a steep climb, so is running rather tiring :) -da there are also quite cozy cafes and wine bars you can just ask the taxi driver what he recommends or investigated previously sth. example out http://www.schliwasweinhandlung.de -said from the mountain are at the bottom (on the river, very nice) and you have to up the mountain then still run ... :) 4 at the end perhaps a brief detour into the Lutheran and then a taxi to the train station. Without the Lutherkriche has also seen a lot of nice when the time is so short, rather longer for the other three points and then relaxed back. Have fun, Sarah Herold
Answer provided by Sarah Herold on 10/25/2014
This answer is helpful
Directly on the market / center there is a Tourist with appropriate literature on the old Chemnitz. The market with church and town hall is 10 min. walk from the main train station. Please ask in the Tour.-info after the museum at the castle pond. There are also historical buildings / Castle Church. The parish office is near there (Schlossberg). Lothar Hofmann
Answer provided by Lothar Hofmann on 10/24/2014
This answer is helpful
Thank you for your inquiry. Unfortunately, Chemnitz was destroyed in the second world war to almost 80%. You can take the watchman book a tour of the historic town hall and visit some churches. Basically, a taxi is recommended from the train station, I would probably have to organize, because not many taxi drivers English can. Please simply again let them know exactly what is desired when.
Answer provided by Jacqueline Husfeldt on 10/24/2014
This answer is helpful
"I need to know what travel methods are there from hotel Achat messe to Klaffenbach moated castle. many thanks." (posted 06/07/2016)

You get there with public transportation towards unfortunately very poorly. Best by car, because you are in 15min because (there are less than 9km) If they want but go by bus or train, you should connect to http://www.vms.de/fahrplan/fahrplanauskunft/ itself times look at. The ride then digesting about 1h. Sincerely, Sarah Herold - Property Mikes
Answer provided by Sarah Herold on 06/08/2016
This answer is helpful

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

"hi guys, 1- what are the neighborhoods that are quite close to the university? 2- what are top/good/safe neighborhoods to live in? 3- Do you recommend any renting agency, preferably furnished apartments? Thanks, Reham" (posted 07/02/2014)

1) Bern Village & Chapel Hill (near the University headquarters, etc., the various faculties are distributed around the city) 2) Kassberg-top residential area / Schlosschemnitz very, very popular, very close to the city with beautiful gardens drum around it. These are the two most beautiful neighborhoods, but as far as security goes, there are hardly any neighborhoods in Chemnitz that are problematic. Sonnenberg and the "new" student neighborhood along the Brühl (this road is close to the center, but for years has been quite vacant) are very inexpensive (yet close to the center) 3) Staying in a furnished apartment for a longer period of time will probably be costly, since it is not so common here (at most, a dorm with partial furnishing). Immonet.de always has good deals, otherwise I do not know a real estate agent or agency that specializes in Chemnitz. Best regards, Sarah Herold
Answer provided by Sarah Herold on 07/03/2014
This answer is helpful

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Chemnitz

  • Kulturkaufhaus Tietz
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Kulturkaufhaus Tietz

    The Kulturkaufhaus Tietz is a cultural centre in Chemnitz, sometimes also called Cultural Department Store. In 1913 the house was built by Wilhelm Kreis. During World War II it was used as a department store by the Jewish family and label Tietz (then called: Kaufhaus Tietz - Department Store of Tietz). In the 1990s the label Kaufhof had a shopping centre there. After a massive restoration of the building, in 2004 it was re-opened as "DAStietz". Since then it contains some shops (e.g. a bakery, a Fair Trade Shop, a bookshop and so on). Also the City Library of Chemnitz and the adult evening classes of the city, the Museum for Natural Education and the New Saxonian Gallery are located there.

  • Saxon Railway Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Saxon Railway Museum

    The Saxon Railway Museum (Sächsisches Eisenbahnmuseum or SEM) is located in Chemnitz, in the state of Saxony, eastern Germany. It is situated on the site of the former locomotive depot (Bahnbetriebswerk or Bw) for goods train locomotives in the district Hilbersdorf.

    After the locomotive depot was closed in 1992, the society moved into the buildings which were protected as historical monuments. As a result the museum has two roundhouses with 20-metre (66 ft) turntables. In addition there are coaling and sanding facilities, water cranes, a working jack for inspection pits and a range of other equipment found in an operational depot.

    The exhibition area describes and portrays the evolution of the railway in Saxony and especially in the area of Chemnitz. In addition to an extensive range of steam, diesel and electric locomotives, the museum also has a large collection of operational, narrow-gauge, Feldbahn engines.

  • Gunzenhauser Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Gunzenhauser Museum

    The Gunzenhauser Museum (German: Museum Gunzenhauser) is a museum and art gallery located in Chemnitz; third largest city of Saxony, Germany. It contains 2,459 works by 270 modern artists of the 20th century that have been collected by the art dealer Dr. Alfred Gunzenhauser. The Gunzenhauser Museum was inaugurated in December 2007 in the presence of the German President Horst Köhler and is one of the most important museums of Modern Art in Germany.

    Building's history

    The museum's building was constructed between 1928 and 1930 in the New Objectivity style as the former headquarter of the Sparkasse Chemnitz (Savings and loan association of Chemnitz) and was one of the first high-rise buildings in Chemnitz.[1] Fred Otto (1883–1944), head of the municipal planning and building control office between 1925 and 1944, purposely abandoned decorative elements and used bright, beige-coloured travertine for the facades. Thus, the building shows its balanced proportions and clear structure to good effect. The building's aesthetic centre is the former tills' hall, which is lighted by a glass roof. During the renovation, the architect Volker Staab took advantage of the existing building's potential and minimized the use of structural addition and interventions.

  • Saxon Museum of Industry
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Saxon Museum of Industry

    The Saxon Museum of Industry is a museum with four locations in Saxony. It is organised as a "special purpose association" (German: Zweckverband), the members of which are the towns of Chemnitz, Crimmitschau, Ehrenfriedersdorf and Hoyerswerda.

    Work of the museum

    Within the scope of researching and presenting the industrial and economic history of Saxony, the association's remit includes collecting and preserving cultural artefacts, preserving Saxony's industrial heritage, and using the buildings as museums.

  • Botanischer Garten Chemnitz
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Botanischer Garten Chemnitz

    The Botanischer Garten Chemnitz (12 hectares) is a municipal botanical garden located at Leipziger Straße 147, Chemnitz, Saxony, Germany. It is open daily without charge.

    The garden was founded in 1898 on a 1-hectare site, and extended in 1933 with an additional 1.75 hectares of orchards. It was badly damaged during World War II, and reconstructed during the 1950s. Today's garden was organized in 1996, with new greenhouses built in 1998 and 2002.

  • Gunzenhauser Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Gunzenhauser Museum

    The Gunzenhauser Museum (German: Museum Gunzenhauser) is a museum and art gallery located in Chemnitz; third largest city of Saxony, Germany. It contains 2,459 works by 270 modern artists of the 20th century that have been collected by the art dealer Dr. Alfred Gunzenhauser. The Gunzenhauser Museum was inaugurated in December 2007 in the presence of the German President Horst Köhler and is one of the most important museums of Modern Art in Germany.

    Building's history

    The museum's building was constructed between 1928 and 1930 in the New Objectivity style as the former headquarter of the Sparkasse Chemnitz (Savings and loan association of Chemnitz) and was one of the first high-rise buildings in Chemnitz. Fred Otto (1883–1944), head of the municipal planning and building control office between 1925 and 1944, purposely abandoned decorative elements and used bright, beige-coloured travertine for the facades. Thus, the building shows its balanced proportions and clear structure to good effect. The building's aesthetic centre is the former tills' hall, which is lighted by a glass roof. During the renovation, the architect Volker Staab took advantage of the existing building's potential and minimized the use of structural addition and interventions.

  • August-Macke-Haus
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    August-Macke-Haus

    August-Macke-Haus is a museum in Bonn, Germany opened in 1991, dedicated to the expressionist painter August Macke. It is located in Macke's former home, where he lived from 1911 to 1914. The museum displays reconstructed interiors and in addition houses temporary exhibitions, usually focusing on Expressionism.

    History

    The house was built in 1877 and acquired by August Macke's father-in-law, Carl Heinrich Gerhardt, in 1884. After Gerhardt's death Macke urged his mother-in-law, who had inherited the house, to remodel the attic as a studio for him. In 1911, Macke, his wife, Elisabeth, and their son moved in. The artist completed more than 400 paintings while living in the house. After Macke's death in World War I in 1914, Elisabeth Macke, her second husband and her children resided in the house until they moved to Berlin in 1925. The house was rented out, but remained the family's property. Elisabeth Macke returned to Bonn in 1948 and lived the house until her death in 1975.



What is your insider travel tip for Chemnitz?

Travel Insider Tips for Chemnitz

Chemnitz Overview

Chemnitz is the third-largest city of the Free State of Saxony, Germany. Chemnitz is an independent city which is not part of any county and seat of the government region Direktionsbezirk Chemnitz. Located in the northern foothills of the Ore Mountains, it is a part of the Saxon triangle metropolitan area comprising 3.5 million people.

Chemnitz is named after the river Chemnitz, a small tributary of the Zwickauer Mulde. The word "Chemnitz" is from the Sorbian language and means "stony brook". The city's economy is based on the service sector and manufacturing industry. The Chemnitz University of Technology has around 10,000 students and is the centre of scientific life.

Things to See in Chemnitz

Tourist sites include the Kassberg neighborhood with 18th and 19th centuries buildings and the Karl Marx Monument by Lev Kerbel, nicknamed "Nischel" (a Saxon dialect word for head, by the locals). Landmarks include the Old Town Hall with its Renaissance portal (15th century), the castle on the land of the former monastery, and the area around the opera house and the old university. The most conspicuous sight is the red tower which was built in the late 12th or early 13th century as part of the city wall.

A petrified forest can be found in the courtyard of Kulturkaufhaus Tietz. It is one of the very few in existence, and dates back several million years. Also within the city limits, in the district of Rabenstein, is the smallest castle in Saxony: Burg Rabenstein.

The town has changed considerably since German reunification. Most of its industry is gone and the core of the city has been rebuilt with many small shops as well as huge shopping centres. Many of these shops are of well known labels, including Zara, H & M, Esprit, Galeria Kaufhof, Leiser Shoes, Peek & Cloppenburg (Cloppenburg vacation rentals | Cloppenburg travel guide) and so on. The large shopping centre "Galerie Roter Turm" (Red Tower) is very popular with young people.

The Chemnitz Industrial Museum is an Anchor Point of ERIH, The European Route of Industrial Heritage.

Newly opened (on December 1, 2007) is the "Museum Gunzenhauser", formerly a bank, which in recent months has been converted into a museum . Dr. Alfred Gunzenhauser, who lived in Munich (Munich vacation rentals | Munich travel guide), had a collection of some 2,500 pieces of modern art, including many paintings and drawings from Otto Dix, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff and others. The Botanischer Garten Chemnitz is a municipal botanical garden, and the Arktisch-Alpiner Garten der Walter-Meusel-Stiftung is a non-profit garden specializing in arctic and alpine plants.

Industriedenkmale

Karl-Marx-Kopf bronze statue

Rathaus and the "gläserne Kaufhaus" Galeria Kaufhof

Theater with Opernhaus

Theaterbühnen Europas

Schauspielhaus

Museum Gunzenhauser

DAStietz

New Sächsische Galerie

Museum for Naturkunde

Technische Universität Chemnitz

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Chemnitz

Heavy destruction in World War II as well as post-war demolition to erect a truly socialistic city centre left the city with a vast open space around its town hall where once a vibrant city heart had been. Due to massive investment in out-of-town shopping right after reunification, it was not until 1999 that major building activity was started in the centre. Comparable only to Potsdamer Platz in Berlin, a whole new quarter of the city was constructed in recent years. New buildings include the Kaufhof Department Store by Helmut Jahn, Galerie Roter Turm with a facade by Hans Kollhoff and Peek&Cloppenburg Clothing Store by Ingenhofen and Partner.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Chemnitz is the third-largest city of the Free State of Saxony, Germany. Chemnitz is an independent city which is not part of any county and seat of the government region Direktionsbezirk Chemnitz. Located in the northern foothills of the Ore Mountains, it is a part of the Saxon triangle metropolitan area comprising 3.5 million people.

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