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Previously asked Cologne questions and answers:

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Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

"Where in Cologne can I buy fresh rolls in the morning or get a nice breakfast with coffee?" (posted 05/31/2014)

You can get fresh rolls in all the bakeries and supermarkets, in most also on Sundays. Great breakfast is offered, among other places, at Cafe Riese in the Schildergasse, but many bakeries (of which Cologne, according to the phonebook, has 328) in the suburbs also have good breakfast offers.
Answer provided by Dorothee Schmitz on 06/02/2014
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There are lots of bakeries in Cologne which start selling breads like sandwiches, with a topping of sausage or cheese, from 6:30 a.m. The breads can be had as normal ones or whole-wheat. Some bakeries even have seating areas where one can sit and enjoy a breakfast of bread rolls, bread, coffee, tea and egg. From where we are, one bakery is just some 7 minutes of walking away (3 minutes by car). Nearly all bakeries offer coffee, cacao, cappuccino, etc. for on-the-go.
Answer provided by Elisabeth Aussem on 05/31/2014
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Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

"I'm very interested in the history and culture of Cologne. Are there any cultural highlights or museums in Cologne that you can recommend?" (posted 06/07/2014)

Hello, History: http://www.museenkoeln.de/roemisch-germanisches-museum/ others: http://www.museenkoeln.de/home/default.aspx?s=445 History of Carnival import locations for rvery cologne citizen: http://www.koelnerkarneval.de/museum/ Greetings B.Ball
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 06/07/2014
This answer is helpful

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

"Can you recommend 2-3 ideas for day trips with interesting targets near Cologne? As we do not want to travel more than 2 hours (one way) we are looking for nearby attractions or points of interests that are worthwhile to visit. What is the best way to get there (car, bus, train?)" (posted 06/02/2014)

Hello, you need Daytripps for a car. Here a 3 place you will not find in your guide. www.bad-honnef.de www.zons-on-rhein.info www.inselhombroich.de Greetings B.Ball
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 06/02/2014
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Good restaurants for dinner?

"Can you recommend me 2-3 good local restaurants in Cologne where I can get a nice and tasty dinner?" (posted 06/01/2014)

Hello, impossible without knowing what Means tasty for you and how you want to pay mucch. Greetings B.Ball
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 06/01/2014
This answer is helpful
For a traditional. Local Esssen Are the breweries recommended. Of which there are quite a few: Early-brewery near the Dom, Am Hof ​​12-18, 50667 Cologne, Altstadt-Nord Tel: 0221 2613211 Peters Brauhaus, mill lane 1, 50667 Cologne Altstadt-Nord, Tel: 0221 2573950 more can be found in the old town. Famous is the restaurant Le Moissonnier with his star cuisine for that special taste in Krefelderstraße 25.Neustadt-North Tel: 0221 729 479 French cuisine, very good reviews,
Answer provided by Peter Schauerte-Lüke on 06/01/2014
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"Restaurants and Bars in Wieden. Open hours shopping center nearby" (posted 09/24/2014)

Unmiitelbar are localities and restaurants in downtown your customer finet more Local
Answer provided by Frenny Schmitz on 09/26/2014
This answer is helpful
Hi, this shopping center is open from 10 -20 clock. There are also many restaurants on the lower level. For other places outside the Cneter I recommend to ask the landlord that all depends on taste.
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 09/25/2014
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Restaurant at my house, brewery, restaurant Keuchhof, La Tasca, The Höfchen. The Rhine Center in Cologne pastures of 09.oo clock to 20:00 clock.
Answer provided by Elisabeth Aussem on 09/25/2014
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"Hello, Will you please tell me where i can find Turkish food and Beef, Chicken food." (posted 01/12/2015)

Hello, everywhere in Cologne you can find it. In Cologne live 200,000 Turkish people and even more germans with Turkish parents. We like the best restaurants in the Cologne, Weidengasse. There are about 10 Turkish restaurants. Greetings B.Ball
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 01/13/2015
This answer is helpful
There are Turkish, chinesiche, Italian and griechiche restaurants nearby. Elisabeth
Answer provided by Elisabeth Aussem on 01/13/2015
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Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

"Are there any local food specialties in Cologne one should try out?" (posted 05/31/2014)

1) Halve Hahn (surprise!) 2) sauerbraten (originally from his horse, nowadays usually beef) 3) Kölsch (Best beer) Koelle Allaaf! D. Schmitz
Answer provided by Dorothee Schmitz on 06/01/2014
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In any case, our breweries. Then there are culinary no country which would not be represented in Cologne with a good restaurant. From German cuisine to Italian, Arab, Turkish and Japanese. There is something for everyone. In our apartment guide are that you can see. Also, we are mt advice and always available. Elisabeth Aussem
Answer provided by Elisabeth Aussem on 05/31/2014
This answer is helpful

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

"Why should someone do a vacation in Cologne? Can you possibly tell me 2-3 popular travel tips for Cologne, which everyone visiting Cologne should see? Also let me know 2-3 special insider travel tips for Cologne that a typical tourist may not know about, but that you can highly recommend. Thanks!" (posted 05/31/2014)

There are a number of very interesting museums, but they are also found in every guide book. In addition to the attractions, the city’s flair is definitely what makes it most worth visiting. There is a great independent theater scene.
Answer provided by Peter Schauerte-Lüke on 06/01/2014
This answer is helpful
Our chocolate museum is definitely the first recommendation. Next, a trip to Phantasialand. Our museums are unique. Our Flora (botanical garden) has been re-opened. It is great, especially with its beautiful café inside. The zoo and the giant aquarium are nearby. Just beautiful. A cable-car ride from Deutz, crossing above the Rhine, into the zoo. In Deutz and a little outside of Cologne, there are beautiful spas. Also, don’t miss going on a “Cologne from Below”-tour. A beautiful thing in the old town is the “beer trail.” On that, you can learn a lot about cologne, beer, and more, visiting several breweries and ending the tour with a typical Cologne-style meal. Not to forget the many concerts performed in Cologne.
Answer provided by Elisabeth Aussem on 05/31/2014
This answer is helpful
Even a native returns to the view of the cathedral of Cologne (Kölner Dom), which does not become any less imposing even after having lived here for 50 years. The other reason are the people, how they live and what they do. In summer, sitting on the Rhine in a chill-out location with sand beach or having a meal on an old ship like the “Alte Liebe” (Old Love) or having dinner in a beautiful restaurant by the Rhine. Breakfast in the chocolate museum, a tasty Kölsch (beer) in one of the breweries in the old town. Cologne from up above in the cable car or, better yet, from the LVR Tower is great. The Carneval Museum and one of the gigantic carnival costume shops, which are open year-round. A visit to Zons, a small historical settlement with a city wall, is also a favorite pastime. Fans of music shouldn’t miss the Philharmonic; such good acoustics aren’t heard every day. Visit one of the local pubs, for the locals and their lifestyle are the best thing about Cologne. Friendly, honest, direct, “kölsch” Lifestyle. Cologne is unique in Germany in that, and famous for it.
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 05/31/2014
This answer is helpful
"What is the best P&R if destination is hotel near Dom? Are there nice veggie restaurants? And any grand cafe where you can enjoy good coffee and read the newspaper? Thanks!" (posted 12/25/2014)

A good and traditional cafe near the Cathedral's Cafe Reichard (lower fat hens 11, 50667 Cologne). Direct few meters away is to track the tip of a cathedral tower in the original size. There are several car parks in the immediate vicinity of the cathedral, there is no especial recommendations. If you want to take the train to Cologne, you can take the RB 25 (S-Bahn). For example, at stop Frankfurter Strasse. From there, it only takes a few minutes to Cologne center. Parking is free. A tip for a veggie restaurant I have unfortunately not.
Answer provided by Frank Becker on 12/26/2014
This answer is helpful
"Been to Köln several times, love it. I said Mass at the Dom, later when I left the priesthood , I got engaged with my wife there (Hohenzollern Bridge), long but great story. My wife and i will be back in early November again for a few days. I have never been to the Turkish quarter, is it worth going, tips? Where is it, off of an U-Bahn stop? " (posted 08/27/2015)

There are several parts of the city, where many Turkish roommates live. The most famous is in Mülheim on the right side of the Rhine (line 18 to Wiener Platz, then line 4 towards Schlebusch 1 station Keupstr .. Get the bombing right Terrorischen took place several years ago, so the sad notoriety. But it also settled many Turks in Eigelstein district (Weidengasse) north of the main train station. Also in the Ehrenfeld district live many Turks. There sssteht also new greetings mosque by a Turk quarters like Chinatown in NY but you do not speak here in Cologne.
Answer provided by Peter Schauerte-Lüke on 08/28/2015
This answer is helpful
Turkish district, there are some in Cologne. There are the district Köln-Ehrenfeld, where the new mosque. Then there's Cologne-Mülheim. A quarter with many Turkish shops and with mostly Turkish residents. There the trams to the Turkish quarter in Cologne. With kind regards from Cologne Elisabeth Aussem
Answer provided by Elisabeth Aussem on 08/28/2015
This answer is helpful

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

"Is there a good local deli or restaurant in Cologne where they serve a good lunch?" (posted 05/31/2014)

In Cologne there are more than a 1000 restaurants, it depends in witch quarterback you are and what you like to eat and how much you like to pay. Gretings B.Ball
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 05/31/2014
This answer is helpful
In Cologne there are in each district a good butcher and also in every neighborhood there are good restaurants. The Brauehäuser in downtown should avoid it, as these are usually supplied by commercial kitchens. Here in Lövenich / pastures there is a good Portuguese "La Tasca" super meat and fresh fish and the house Germania for good German food. Otherwise, a good Arab "Dubai" and many fast-food restaurants.
Answer provided by Elisabeth Aussem on 05/31/2014
This answer is helpful

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

"Are there any special points of interests or local attractions in Cologne that you can recommend that are worthwhile visiting?" (posted 06/12/2014)

Hello, you are definitely the DOM, the Chocolate Museum, the LVR Tower (great view over Cologne), the Rheinauhafen and the Carnival Museum (the soul is located in the Cologne Carnival) have visited. Yours sincerely, Barbara Ball
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 06/12/2014
This answer is helpful

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

"Any sporting activites and recommendations in Cologne to stay active?" (posted 06/04/2014)

Here are the activities: http://www.blackfoot-hochseilgarten.de/ Search www.chimpanzodrome.de/ Jogging track: http://www.fitforfun.de/sport/laufen/laufstrecken-guide/koeln/waldweg/um-den deck steiner-weiher.html Cycling: http://www.stadt-koeln.de/leben-in-koeln/freizeit-natur-sport/ferien-freizeit/radtouren-und-um-koeln Bike rental: http://www .radstationkoeln.de / Radstation-hbf / bicycle verleih.html Best Regards Barbara Ball www.ferien-koeln.de
Answer provided by Barbara Ball on 06/04/2014
This answer is helpful
"Hello! My husband and I will be in Cologne on April 3rd and 4th. We would love to do a day hike. We will be prepared for damp and cold, possibly rain. We would like a trail with easy access from the city, and with a total distance of 8-10 miles. We are interested in natural and architectural scenery...anything that is a good taste of Germany packed into one hike! We are moderately experienced hikers in the Rocky Mountains. I have seen some great trails advertised, but I am not sure which will have the best section accessible from Cologne?? Please advise? Thank you much!! -Lacey and Aaron" (posted 03/26/2015)

There are two possibilities: 1. Along the Rhine, starting in the center of Cologne Cathedral go to the Rhine and then up the Rhine until you have no more desire, for example, to Cologne Rodenkirchen're maybe something to eat on a floating restaurant or in Roden churches. 2. Highly recommended for tourists: The Cologne Main Station to the Ahr Valley http://www.ahr-rotweinwanderweg.de/altenahr.html; http://www.ahr-rotweinwanderweg.de/rotweinwanderweg.html). The Red Wine Trail starts in Altenahr with the rise to the ruins of Are. We follow the hiking sign red grape now 35 kms to bathroom floor village. Time it goes through the open vineyards, sometimes followed by a part of the way through the shady forest. Along the way you can always stay in one of the places to take a break or to take the train to the starting point.
Answer provided by Frank Becker on 03/26/2015
This answer is helpful

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Cologne

  • Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cologne
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cologne

    The Archdiocese of Cologne (Latin: Archidioecesis Coloniensis; German: Erzbistum Köln) is an archdiocese of the Catholic Church in western North Rhine-Westphalia and northern Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany.

    The Electorate of Cologne - not to be confused with the larger Archdiocese of Cologne (see map on the left) - was one of the major ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire. The city of Cologne as such became a free city in 1288 and the archbishop eventually moved his residence from Cologne Cathedral to Bonn to avoid conflicts with the Free City, which escaped his jurisdiction.

    After 1795, the archbishopric's territories on the left bank of the Rhine were occupied by France, and were formally annexed in 1801. The Reichsdeputationshauptschluss of 1803 secularized the rest of the archbishopric, giving the Duchy of Westphalia to the Landgraviate of Hesse-Darmstadt. Cologne was, however, reestablished as the seat of a Roman Catholic archbishop in 1824, and is an archdiocese to the present day.

  • Great St. Martin Church, Cologne
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Great St. Martin Church, Cologne

    The Great Saint Martin Church (German: Groß Sankt Martin, mostly Groß St. Martin) is a Romanesque Catholic church in Cologne, Germany. Its foundations (circa 960 AD) rest on remnants of a Roman chapel, built on what was then an island in the Rhine. The church was later transformed into a Benedictine monastery. The current buildings, including a soaring crossing tower that is a landmark of Cologne's Old Town, were erected between 1150-1250. The architecture of its eastern end forms a triconch or trefoil plan, consisting of three apses around the crossing, similar to that at St. Maria im Kapitol. The church was badly damaged in World War II, with restoration work completed in 1985.

    As of 2009 Great Saint Martin is being used by a branch of the Monastic Fraternities of Jerusalem and is open for visits again.

  • Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Roman Catholic Diocese of Münster

    The Diocese of Münster is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Germany. It is a suffragan diocese of the Archdiocese of Cologne. Bishop Felix Genn is the current Bishop of the Diocese of Münster. He was ordained to the priesthood on July 11, 1976 and was appointed to the See of Münster on December 19, 2008.

    As of 31 Dec. 2006, with 4,336 million or 47.1%, nearly half of the population in the Münster diocese was Roman Catholic; due to the continuing securalisation this is a lower percentage than before. Sunday mass attendance is also significantly less nowadays than one, two or three decades ago. As per the diocese Web site: in 2005, 13.6% Roman Catholics attended Sunday mass; in 2004, this was 14.5%. One decade before, in 1995, Sunday mass attendance was about 20% (416.406 churchgoers); in 1985, Sunday mass attendance was 29.3% (614,839 Roman Catholics); and, in 1975, Sunday mass attendance was 35.1% or 787,582 persons. Therefore, in 30 years, Sunday mass attendance dropped more than half.

    As of 18 July 2007 there were 1,256 priests, 248 permanent deacons and 3,150 religious in the archdiocese.

  • Shrine of the Three Kings
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Shrine of the Three Kings

    The Shrine of the Three Kings (German Dreikönigsschrein) is a reliquary said to contain the bones of the Biblical Magi, also known as the Three Kings or the Three Wise Men. The shrine is a large gilded and decorated triple sarcophagus placed above and behind the high altar of Cologne Cathedral. It is considered the high point of Mosan art and the largest reliquary in the western world.

    The Shrine of the Three Kings is approximately 43 inches (110 cm) wide, 60 inches (153 cm) high, and 87 inches (220 cm) long. It is shaped like a basilica: two sarcophagi stand next to each other, with the third sarcophagus resting on their roof ridges. The ends are completely covered, so there is no space visible between the sarcophagi. The basic structure is made of wood, with gold and silver overlay decorated with filigree, enamel, and over 1000 jewels and beads. The latter include a large number of cameos and intaglio pieces, some pre-Christian.

  • German National Library of Medicine
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    German National Library of Medicine

    The German National Library of Medicine (German: Deutsche Zentralbibliothek für Medizin), abbreviated ZB MED, is the national library of the Federal Republic of Germany for medicine, health sciences, nutrition, agriculture and the environment. It has two locations: Cologne and Bonn. The library is jointly financed by the Federal Ministry of Health and the 16 States of Germany. It is operated under the auspices of the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia.

    The medical library was initially formed 1973 through the mergers of several much older institutions. Between 2001 and 2003 it was further expanded to include nutritional, environmental and agricultural sciences. As a result, today ZB MED is the world's largest specialist library in its five subjects and the largest medical library in Europe.

  • Hohe Straße
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Hohe Straße

    Hohe Straße is a shopping street in the old town of Cologne, Germany, and one of the city's both oldest and busiest streets. Together with many of its adjacent side streets, Hohe Straße is part of a designated pedestrian zone and spans about 680 meters from Cologne Cathedral on its Northern end to Schildergasse on its Southern end.

  • Hohenzollern Bridge
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Hohenzollern Bridge

    The Hohenzollern Bridge (German: Hohenzollernbrücke) is a bridge crossing the river Rhine in the German city of Cologne (German Köln). It crosses the Rhine at kilometre 688.5. Originally, the bridge was both a railway and street bridge, however, after its destruction in 1945 and its subsequent reconstruction, it was only accessible to rail and pedestrian traffic.

    It is the most heavily used railway bridge in Germany, connecting the Köln Hauptbahnhof and Köln Messe/Deutz stations with each other.

  • Museum Ludwig
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Museum Ludwig

    Museum Ludwig, located in Cologne, Germany, houses a collection of modern art. It includes works from Pop Art, Abstract and Surrealism, and has one of the largest Picasso collections in Europe. It also features many works by Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.

    Since November 2012, Philipp Kaiser is director of the museum.

  • Cologne Public Library
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne Public Library

    The Cologne Public Library (German: StadtBibliothek Köln) is among the biggest and most important public libraries in Germany. The central library is part of the ‘Kulturquartier’ (a cultural hub) near the Neumarkt. It is located at the Josef-Haubrich-Hof, with the new Rautenstrauch-Joest-Museum (cultures of the world) in its immediate neighbourhood. Since 2008, Dr. Hannelore Vogt has been the director of the library.

    The library system

    The library system is made up of the central library, 11 branch libraries, a mobile library and several special collections. Within the local authorities, the library is affiliated to the department of art and culture. The library provides the residents of Cologne (about a million inhabitants) with information resources for education and training; in addition, there are many users from the region around Cologne and from neighbouring countries (Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg).

  • Wallraf-Richartz Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Wallraf-Richartz Museum

    The Wallraf-Richartz-Museum & Fondation Corboud is one of the three major museums in Cologne, Germany. It houses an art gallery with a collection of fine art from the medieval period to the early twentieth century.

    The Madonna in the Rose Bower, shown at right, is among the Gothic paintings in the collection of the Wallraf-Richartz Museum. It was created by Stefan Lochner, who lived between 1410 and 1451 in Germany, mainly working in Cologne. He is considered a late Gothic painter. His work usually has a clean appearance, combining the Gothic attention toward long flowing lines with brilliant colors and a Flemish influence of realism and attention to detail. This painting is considered typical of his style. It was executed about 1450 and shows the Virgin and Child reposing in a blooming rose arbor that is attended by Lochner's characteristic, child angels.

  • Schnütgen Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Schnütgen Museum

    The Schnütgen Museum (Museum Schnütgen in German) in Cologne (Köln), Germany is devoted to Christian religious art, mainly medieval, but some parts of the collection, such as its textiles and prints, extend from antiquity to the modern period. In 1906, the collection of Alexander Schnütgen was donated to the city, and the collection has continued to expand, so that until the opening of a new building in 2010, only about 10% of its 13,000 items could be displayed. Now some 2,000 objects are on display in 1900 sq. metres of gallery space, with an additional 1300 sq. metres for special exhibitions. Schnütgen (1843–1918) was a Catholic priest and theologian; according to the museum website "Up to now people tell stories about his zealous and sometimes crafty collection tactics".

    Since 1956, the museum has occupied the large Romanesque church of St. Cäcilien, founded in 881 for noble canonesses, with the present building dating from 1130–60, with murals from about 1300. An annex built by architect Karl Band was added in the 1950s, and new buildings (part of the Kulturquartier, “Culture quarter“) opened in 2010. Highlights of the collection include a Romanesque tympanum from St Cecilia's itself, several large wooden crucifixes, including the 11th century Cross of St George's, as well as a large collection of early bronze ones, including the only other work generally attributed to Rainer of Huy apart from his Liège baptismal font.

  • Museum für Angewandte Kunst (Cologne)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Museum für Angewandte Kunst (Cologne)

    The Museum für Angewandte Kunst Köln (German for Museum of Applied Art, abbreviated MAKK) is a decorative arts museum in Cologne, Germany. The collections include jewellery, porcelain, furniture, weaponry and architectural exhibits. Until 1987 it was called the Kunstgewerbemuseum (Decorative Art Museum).

    The plain, red-brick Schwarz-Bernhard building stands on the site of a former Conventual monastery, whose shape is still traced by the ground plan and the square inner courtyard. The late-Gothic Minoritenkirche on the south side still survives. The inner courtyard wall on the north side has been almost entirely glazed, acting as a "shop window" for the museum. A low, modest antechamber leads into the museum's very large entrance hall and central staircase.

  • Kolumba
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Kolumba

    The Kolumba (previously Diözesanmuseum, "Diocesan Museum") is an art museum in Cologne, Germany. It is located on the site of the former St. Columba church, and run by the Archdiocese of Cologne. It is one of the oldest museums in the city, alongside the Wallraf-Richartz Museum.

    Collection

    The collection includes paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, decorative art and religious icons from Late Antiquity to the present. Apart from a few works on permanent display, the presentation features a regularly changing selection of the museum's holdings. The items are generally displayed without accompanying text, and in no particular chronological or stylistic order.

  • Käthe Kollwitz Museum (Cologne)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Käthe Kollwitz Museum (Cologne)

    The Käthe Kollwitz Museum in Cologne owns one of the largest collections of works by the German artist Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945).

    It opened on 22 April 1985, the 40th anniversary of Kollwitz's death. The basis of the collection, consisting of 60 graphical works along with all 15 of the artist's bronze sculptures, was acquired by the Kreissparkasse Köln (a savings bank) from Kollwitz's granddaughters in 1983. These works had previously been under the care of the Wallraf-Richartz Museum in Cologne and the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart.

    The museum is located above a shopping gallery at Cologne's Neumarkt. It now owns over 750 works by Kollwitz, and has received over 500,000 visitors since its founding.

  • Skulpturen Park Köln
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Skulpturen Park Köln

    Skulpturen Park Köln (Cologne Sculpture Park) is a major international overview of contemporary sculpture which has been on display to the public, in a series of two-year exhibitions, in Cologne, Germany, since 1997.

    The 25,000 square feet (2,300 m2) public park features works by German and international artists. It is described as a "place for the exploration of contemporary sculpture". There is no permanent collection but instead, every two years, the exhibits are replaced. The garden is operated privately in cooperation with the City of Cologne.

    The park was initiated by Cologne art collector Dr. Michael Stoffel, who founded the Society of Friends of Cologne Sculpture Park. Following the death of Stoffel in 2005, his wife, Eleonore, took over as Director until her death in April 2007. On the initiative of the Michael and Eleonore Stoffel Foundation (MES) the Foundation Cologne Sculpture Park was established in 2008 and has now taken over the management of the park. It is thanks to the board of the MES, that the sculptures in the park are on permanent loan from the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich.

    In 1997 the park, with mature trees, already existed as a derelict green space in front of Cologne Zoo, between Zoobrücke and the Rhine. Its conversion to a sculpture park saw the site as a new development on Riehler Srasse, diagonally across from the Zoo. The park has a second entrance from Konrad-Adenauer-Ufer. There are car parking spaces located under the zoo bridge and the park lounge offers drinks and snacks to visitors.

    The park is open daily (April - September: 10.30 - 19.00; October - March: 10.30 - 17.00) and admission is free. On the first Sunday of the month at 15.00, a guided tour is available for a small fee. There is an innovative Mobile Art Guide available via smartphone with exhibit labels coded accordingly.

  • Romano-Germanic Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Romano-Germanic Museum

    The Roman-Germanic Museum (RGM, in German: Römisch-Germanisches Museum) is an important archaeological museum in Cologne, Germany. It has a large collection of Roman artifacts from the Roman settlement of Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, on which modern Cologne is built. The museum protects the original site of a Roman town villa, from which a large Dionysus mosaic remains in its original place in the basement, and the related Roman Road just outside. In this respect the museum is an archaeological site.

    The museum also has the task of preserving the Roman cultural heritage of Cologne, and therefore houses an extensive collection of Roman glass from funerals and burials and also exercises archaeological supervision over the construction of the Cologne underground.

    Most of the museum's collection was housed at the Wallraf-Richartz Museum in Cologne until 1946. In the front of the museum the former northern town gate of Cologne with the inscription CCAA (for Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium) is on display.

  • KölnTriangle
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    KölnTriangle

    KölnTriangle (formerly also known as LVR-Turm) is a 103.2 metres (339 ft) tall building in Deutz, Cologne, and a prominent landmark in Cologne. The building was designed by Dörte Gatermann of Cologne-based architecture firm Gatermann + Schossig and completed in 2006. Its south facade consists of a double-facade, allowing natural ventilation even at high floors. Next to the high-rise structure, part of KölnTriangle is also a much larger 6-storey office block with a total gross floor area of 84.300 m².

    KölnTriangle is headquarters of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The top floor and roof houses a publicly accessible observation deck with panorama views all over Cologne, in particular Cologne Cathedral, directly opposite the Rhine.

  • Messeturm Köln
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Messeturm Köln

    The Messeturm Köln (German for Fair Tower Cologne) is a highrise building 80 meters high in Cologne, Germany. Its top floor features a tower restaurant.

  • Mülheim Bridge, Cologne
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Mülheim Bridge, Cologne

    The Mülheim Bridge (Mülheimer Brücke) in Cologne is a suspension bridge on the river Rhine in Western Germany. It has a main span of 315 metres. The bridge was originally completed in 1929 and rebuilt between 1949 and 1951, having been destroyed in 1944. It connects the city district Riehl on the west side of the river with Mülheim on the east side, after which the bridge is named.

  • Shrine of the Three Kings
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Shrine of the Three Kings

    The Shrine of the Three Kings (German Dreikönigsschrein) is a reliquary said to contain the bones of the Biblical Magi, also known as the Three Kings or the Three Wise Men. The shrine is a large gilded and decorated triple sarcophagus placed above and behind the high altar of Cologne Cathedral. It is considered the high point of Mosan art and the largest reliquary in the western world.

  • Cologne Cathedral (Koelner Dom)

    Begun in 1248, the construction of this Gothic masterpiece took place in several stages and was not completed until 1880. Over seven centuries, successive builders were inspired by the same faith and a spirit of absolute fidelity to the original plans. Granted UNESCO World Heritage Site status in 1996, the committee noted: Apart from its exceptional intrinsic value and the artistic masterpieces it contains, Cologne Cathedral testifies to the enduring strength of European Christianity.

    The Shrine of the Three Kings is a reliquary said to contain the bones of the Biblical Magi, also known as the Three Kings or the Three Wise Men. The shrine is a large gilded and decorated triple sarcophagus placed above and behind the high altar of Cologne Cathedral. It is considered the high point of Mosan art and the largest reliquary in the western world.

    In the tower visitors can climb 509 steps of the spiral staircase to a viewing platform about 98 metres above the ground. The cathedral treasury contains many valuable artworks and artifacts.

    Hours: November - April 6am - 7:30pm. May - October: 6am - 10pm. Closed during Mass. Check the website for Tower and Treasure Chamber Hours

    Admission: Combined Tower and Treasure Chamber: 5 € Adults, 2.50 € Children.

  • Rheinauhafen
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Rheinauhafen

    The Rheinauhafen (lit. Rheinau harbour) is a 15.4 hectares (38 acres) urban regeneration project in Cologne, Germany, located along the River Rhine between the Südbrücke (Southern Railway Bridge) and Severinsbrücke (Severin Bridge), just south of the inner city's historic old town.

    The project is set around the actual Rheinauhafen, a formerly commercial harbour developed during the 1880s, and spans 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) in the north-south direction and 200 metres (660 ft) east-west at its widest. Planning for the redevelopment project commenced with an urban design competition during the early 1990s, with construction starting in 2002 and scheduled to be completed by 2011. The project comprises some 15.4 hectares (38 acres) of waterfront land mainly used for offices, cultural institutions, hotels and dwellings. The formerly commercial port is now being used as a marina. Architectural landmarks are the former Siebengebirge wharf warehouses and the three Kranhaus buildings (from south to north "KranhausPLUS", "Kranhaus1" and "Pandion Vista"), allegorizing the historical harbour cranes. The middle one ("Kranhaus1") was awarded the MIPIM Award in Cannes on March 12, 2009 in the category of Best Business Centre.

    The new Rheinauhafen is home to numerous companies of the creative industry; among the larger companies and law firms are Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer (in "KranhausPLUS"), CMS Hasche Sigle (in "Kranhaus1"), Electronic Arts (own building) and Microsoft (own building); among the cultural organisations are the Kap am Südkai, German Sport & Olympia Museum and Imhoff-Schokoladenmuseum.

  • Schildergasse
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Schildergasse

    The Schildergasse is a shopping street in central Cologne, Germany, and with 13,000 people passing through every hour, it is the busiest shopping street in Europe. The Schildergasse is a designated pedestrian zone and spans about 500 meters from Hohe Straße on the Eastern end to Neumarkt on the Western end.

    The street dates back to Roman times, where it was the city's Decumanus Maximus. During the Middle Ages it was home to artists who painted coats of arms where the street got its name from (Schild meaning Shield). Among today's landmarks on Schildergasse are St. Antoniter church, the oldest Protestant church in Cologne, and Peek & Cloppenburg's Weltstadthaus, designed by Renzo Piano.

  • Käthe Kollwitz Museum (Cologne)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Käthe Kollwitz Museum (Cologne)

    The Käthe Kollwitz Museum in Cologne owns one of the largest collections of works by the German artist Käthe Kollwitz (1867–1945).

    It opened on 22 April 1985, the 40th anniversary of Kollwitz's death. The basis of the collection, consisting of 60 graphical works along with all 15 of the artist's bronze sculptures, was acquired by the Kreissparkasse Köln (a savings bank) from Kollwitz's granddaughters in 1983. These works had previously been under the care of the Wallraf-Richartz Museum in Cologne and the Staatsgalerie in Stuttgart.

    The museum is located above a shopping gallery at Cologne's Neumarkt. It now owns over 750 works by Kollwitz, and has received over 500,000 visitors since its founding.

  • Kolumba
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Kolumba

    The Kolumba (previously Diözesanmuseum, "Diocesan Museum") is an art museum in Cologne, Germany. It is located on the site of the former St. Columba church, and run by the Archdiocese of Cologne. It is one of the oldest museums in the city, alongside the Wallraf-Richartz Museum.

  • Museum für Angewandte Kunst (Cologne)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Museum für Angewandte Kunst (Cologne)

    The Museum für Angewandte Kunst Köln (German for Museum of Applied Art, abbreviated MAKK) is a decorative arts museum in Cologne, Germany. The collections include jewellery, porcelain, furniture, weaponry and architectural exhibits. Until 1987 it was called the Kunstgewerbemuseum (Decorative Art Museum).

    The plain, red-brick Schwarz-Bernhard building stands on the site of a former Conventual monastery, whose shape is still traced by the ground plan and the square inner courtyard. The late-Gothic Minoritenkirche on the south side still survives. The inner courtyard wall on the north side has been almost entirely glazed, acting as a "shop window" for the museum. A low, modest antechamber leads into the museum's very large entrance hall and central staircase.

  • Museum Ludwig
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Museum Ludwig

    Museum Ludwig, located in Cologne, Germany, houses a collection of modern art. It includes works from Pop Art, Abstract and Surrealism, and has one of the largest Picasso collections in Europe. It also features many works by Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.

    Since November 2012, Philipp Kaiser is director of the museum.

  • Skulpturen Park Köln
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Skulpturen Park Köln

    Skulpturen Park Köln (Cologne Sculpture Park) is a major international overview of contemporary sculpture which has been on display to the public, in a series of two-year exhibitions, in Cologne, Germany, since 1997.

    The 25,000 square feet (2,300 m2) public park features works by German and international artists. It is described as a "place for the exploration of contemporary sculpture". There is no permanent collection but instead, every two years, the exhibits are replaced. The garden is operated privately in cooperation with the City of Cologne.

    The park was initiated by Cologne art collector Dr. Michael Stoffel, who founded the Society of Friends of Cologne Sculpture Park. Following the death of Stoffel in 2005, his wife, Eleonore, took over as Director until her death in April 2007. On the initiative of the Michael and Eleonore Stoffel Foundation (MES) the Foundation Cologne Sculpture Park was established in 2008 and has now taken over the management of the park. It is thanks to the board of the MES, that the sculptures in the park are on permanent loan from the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich.

    In 1997 the park, with mature trees, already existed as a derelict green space in front of Cologne Zoo, between Zoobrücke and the Rhine. Its conversion to a sculpture park saw the site as a new development on Riehler Srasse, diagonally across from the Zoo. The park has a second entrance from Konrad-Adenauer-Ufer. There are car parking spaces located under the zoo bridge and the park lounge offers drinks and snacks to visitors.

    The park is open daily (April - September: 10.30 - 19.00; October - March: 10.30 - 17.00) and admission is free. On the first Sunday of the month at 15.00, a guided tour is available for a small fee. There is an innovative Mobile Art Guide available via smartphone with exhibit labels coded accordingly.

  • Wallraf-Richartz Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Wallraf-Richartz Museum

    The Wallraf-Richartz-Museum & Fondation Corboud is one of the three major museums in Cologne, Germany. It houses an art gallery with a collection of fine art from the medieval period to the early twentieth century.

    The Madonna in the Rose Bower, shown at right, is among the Gothic paintings in the collection of the Wallraf-Richartz Museum. It was created by Stefan Lochner, who lived between 1410 and 1451 in Germany, mainly working in Cologne. He is considered a late Gothic painter. His work usually has a clean appearance, combining the Gothic attention toward long flowing lines with brilliant colors and a Flemish influence of realism and attention to detail. This painting is considered typical of his style. It was executed about 1450 and shows the Virgin and Child reposing in a blooming rose arbor that is attended by Lochner's characteristic, child angels.

  • Imhoff-Schokoladenmuseum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Imhoff-Schokoladenmuseum

    The Imhoff-Schokoladenmuseum (Imhoff chocolate museum) was opened by Hans Imhoff on 31 October 1993. It is situated in the Cologne quarter of Altstadt-Süd on the Rheinauhafen peninsula. The exhibits show the entire history of chocolate, from its beginnings with the Olmecs, Maya and Aztecs to contemporary products and production methods.

    With 5,000 guided tours and 600,000 visitors a year, the museum is in the Top Ten of German museums. The museum is entirely self-supporting, receiving no subsidy. It has its own marketing department and is used by the Schokoladenmuseum Gastronomie GmbH for events.

  • Romano-Germanic Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Romano-Germanic Museum

    The Roman-Germanic Museum (RGM, in German: Römisch-Germanisches Museum) is an important archaeological museum in Cologne, Germany. It has a large collection of Roman artifacts from the Roman settlement of Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, on which modern Cologne is built. The museum protects the original site of a Roman town villa, from which a large Dionysus mosaic remains in its original place in the basement, and the related Roman Road just outside. In this respect the museum is an archaeological site.

    The museum also has the task of preserving the Roman cultural heritage of Cologne, and therefore houses an extensive collection of Roman glass from funerals and burials and also exercises archaeological supervision over the construction of the Cologne underground.

    Most of the museum's collection was housed at the Wallraf-Richartz Museum in Cologne until 1946. In the front of the museum the former northern town gate of Cologne with the inscription CCAA (for Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium) is on display.

  • Schnütgen Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Schnütgen Museum

    The Schnütgen Museum (Museum Schnütgen in German) in Cologne (Köln), Germany is devoted to Christian religious art, mainly medieval, but some parts of the collection, such as its textiles and prints, extend from antiquity to the modern period. In 1906, the collection of Alexander Schnütgen was donated to the city, and the collection has continued to expand, so that until the opening of a new building in 2010, only about 10% of its 13,000 items could be displayed. Now some 2,000 objects are on display in 1900 sq. metres of gallery space, with an additional 1300 sq. metres for special exhibitions. Schnütgen (1843–1918) was a Catholic priest and theologian; according to the museum website "Up to now people tell stories about his zealous and sometimes crafty collection tactics".

    Since 1956, the museum has occupied the large Romanesque church of St. Cäcilien, founded in 881 for noble canonesses, with the present building dating from 1130–60, with murals from about 1300. An annex built by architect Karl Band was added in the 1950s, and new buildings (part of the Kulturquartier, “Culture quarter“) opened in 2010. Highlights of the collection include a Romanesque tympanum from St Cecilia's itself, several large wooden crucifixes, including the 11th century Cross of St George's, as well as a large collection of early bronze ones, including the only other work generally attributed to Rainer of Huy apart from his Liège baptismal font. The museum has a late Carolingian evangeliary of 860–880, and a single leaf from the English St Albans Psalter. The "Comb of St Heribert" is a 9th century ivory liturgical comb, and the "Harrach Diptych" a Carolingian ivory of about 810 (on loan from the Ludwig collection). Ivories, stained glass, textiles including vestments, metalwork and paintings are all well represented.

  • The Roman-Germanic Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    The Roman-Germanic Museum

    The Roman-Germanic Museum (RGM, in German: Römisch-Germanisches Museum) has a large collection of Roman artifacts from the Roman settlement Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium, on which modern Cologne is built. The museum protects the original place of a Roman town villa, of which the large Dionysus Mosaic remains in its original place in the basement now, and the related Roman Road just outside. In this respect the museum is an archaeological site.

    The museum also is the institution to preserve the Cologne Roman cultural heritage, and therefore preserves wonderful Roman glass from Roman funerals and burial. This archaeological function also includes the supervision of the Cologne underground, which is now under construction.

    Hours: Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 5pm.

    Admission: 5 € Adults, 3 € Concessions, Free for under 18 years.

  • Wallraf-Richartz-Museum — Fondation Corboud
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Wallraf-Richartz-Museum — Fondation Corboud

    The Wallraf-Richartz-Museum & Fondation Corboud is Cologne’s oldest museum and one of the foremost picture galleries in Germany. The museum invites you to come face to face with great masterpieces of European art. The Wallraf has one of the world’s leading collections of medieval painting, with Stefan Lochner’s Madonna of the Rose Bower as its greatest attraction. Other highlights include works by the Baroque masters, ranging from Rubens and Rembrandt to Murillo and Boucher, the German Romantics, French Realism, and Impressionism. Embark on a voyage through 700 years of art history. Thanks to the paintings from the Fondation Corboud, the Wallraf-Richartz-Museum has the widest collection of impressionist and neo-impressionist art in Germany. Manet, Monet, Renoir, Pissarro, Sisley, Morisot, Signac and Seurat are all represented by outstanding works, and van Gogh, Cézanne, Gauguin, Bonnard, Ensor and Munch herald the way to modernism.

    Hours: Tuesday - Friday 10am - 6pm (open until 10pm on Thursdays), Saturday and Sunday 11am - 6pm.

    Admission: Admission charges vary, depending on whether there is a special exhibition. Adults pay 6 € - 9 €.

  • Art of the Middle Ages Museum Schnütgen

    Art of the Middle Ages Museum Schnütgen

    In the former collegiate church of St. Caecilia one of the most important collections of medieval art in Europe is presented in unique surroundings. There are masterpieces of international standing stretching across 1,000 years: including wooden and stone sculptures, goldsmith work, bronzes and ivory, glass paintings, textiles, church furniture and hand-written scripts.

    Hours: Tuesday - Friday 10am - 5pm. Saturday and Sunday 11am - 5pm.

    Admission: Adults 3.20 €, Concessions 1.90 €, Free for under18 years.

  • The twelve Romanesque churches
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    The twelve Romanesque churches

    Countless legends are told about the construction of the twelve Romanesque churches huddled together within the old city walls. The collegiate churches or monasteries are among the most important throughout Western Europe and document the growth and wealth of high medieval Cologne.

    The Via Sacra ring encircles the old city center and interlinks the city’s Romanesque churches. Twelve of these precious buildings give an impression of Cologne’s importance during the Middle Ages. For centuries, the high crossing tower of Groß St. Martin has been a characteristic feature of the Cologne panorama, which is framed in the north by the twin-tower chancel facade of St. Kunibert and in the south by St. Severin. St. Gereon is the principal attraction in the northern Old Town. The church was named after a Roman officer who refused to fight Christians in Cologne. In the early 13th century, the Roman oval building of St. Gereon was integrated into its today decagon construction, a work of genius. St. Maria im Kapitol, built on the foundations of a Roman temple, is another significant construction of Romanesque art in the heart of Cologne’s Old Town.

  • Fragrance Museum Farina-Haus
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Fragrance Museum Farina-Haus

    The Farina fragrance museum is situated across from the town-hall, and near the famous Wallraf-Richartz-Museum in the Obenmarspforten street in Cologne. Founded in 1709, John Maria Farina opposite the Jülichs Place is the eldest fragrance factory still standing and has housed the registered office since 1723.

    The museum provides over several floors a very detailed insight into the production methods of perfume throughout the various stages. The focus is primarily laid on Eau de Cologne, and you will therefore discover some particular technical devices such as distillation apparatus which were once used. In addition to the equipment, you will also be able to witness the evolution thanks to various pictures and documents which help trace back history. Moreover, as copyright didn’t exist in those days, a great deal of imitations and forgeries of Eau de Cologne rapidly appeared on the market and a certain number of them are also presented in the museum. Further details as to the changes in the manufacturing of Farina Eau de Cologne are also on display.

    Hours: Monday through Saturday 10am - 6pm, Sunday 11am - 4pm.

    Admission: 5 €.

  • Chocolate Museum (Schokoladenmuseum)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Chocolate Museum (Schokoladenmuseum)

    The Cologne Chocolate Museum provides an exciting insight into numerous aspects of history and modern times of chocolate and cocoa. Situated on the Rheinauhafen peninsula on the left banks of the Rhine directly in front of the Old Town near to Cologne cathedral, the Chocolate Museum seems a futuristic ship, made of glass and aluminium. Visitors reach the museum from the Rhine promenade over an old revolving bridge.

    A tour of the exhibition extends over three floors of the museum and takes you on a journey through the 3,000 year history of chocolate – from the food of the Gods for the Aztecs to a modern industrial product.

    Hours: Monday - Friday 10am - 6pm. Saturday and Sunday 11am - 7pm.

    Admission: Adults 7.50 €, Concessions 5 €.

  • National Socialism Documentation Centre (EL-DE Haus)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    National Socialism Documentation Centre (EL-DE Haus)

    EL-DE Haus, officially the Nazism Documentation Center, located in Cologne, is the former headquarters of the Gestapo and now a museum documenting the Third Reich.

    The building was at first the business premises of Jewish jeweler Leopold Dahmen, and the building takes its name from his initials. In 1934, the Nazis seized the building from him and turned it into the headquarters of the secret police, the Gestapo. Surprisingly, the building survived the Allied bombing of Cologne during World War II, while 90% of the city was destroyed. After the bombings, the basements of the building, which had been used as prison cells and torture rooms for forced laborers and political enemies, were used to store wartime files and paperwork. Inscriptions made on the walls of the prison cells by inmates can still be viewed today. The building was the site of many executions, as well as deaths due to overcrowding and poor hygienic conditions.

    In 2006, the National Socialist Documentation Center was awarded the Best in Heritage award, which is given to select museums.

    Hours: Monday - Friday 10am - 4pm (open until 6pm on Thursday), Saturday and Sunday 11am - 4pm.

    Admission: Adults 3.6 €, Concessions 1.50 €, Children under 18 years Free.

  • German Sports & Olympics Museum

    German Sports & Olympics Museum

    On around 2,000 square meters of exhibition and event area on two floors various aspects of all kinds of national, international and olympic sports are shown in a permanent exhibition and several changing exhibitions. Visitors can themselves be active at numerous points throughout the museum.

    Hours: Tuesday - Friday 10am - 6pm. Saturday and Sunday 11am - 7pm.

    Admission: Adults 5 €, Concessions 2.50 €, Family Card 12.50 €.

  • Flora und Botanischer Garten Köln
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Flora und Botanischer Garten Köln

    The Flora und Botanischer Garten Köln (11.5 hectares) is a municipal formal park and botanical garden located adjacent to Cologne Zoological Garden at Amsterdamer Straße 34, Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is open daily without charge.

    The garden dates to 1863 when a private joint-stock company was organized to create Flora park (5.5 hectares) as a replacement for the city's older botanical garden near the Cologne Cathedral, which in 1857 was destroyed for construction of the central railway station. This new park was designed by Peter Joseph Lenné in 1864 in a mixed German style, incorporating French Baroque, Italian Renaissance, and English landscape garden elements. In its center is a glass palace (orangery) structure of cast iron and glass patterned upon the Crystal Palace (London) and Jardin d'hiver (Paris), which served as an exhibition site through the late 19th century, including horticultural exhibitions in 1875 and 1888, and an industrial exhibition in 1889. Frauen-Rosenhof, an art nouveau garden, was added in 1906.

    Between 1912-1914, as it suffered financial problems, the garden was acquired by the city, which in 1914 built an adjacent botanical garden (4.5 hectares). These two gardens were united in 1920, with new glasshouses and exhibition houses for exotic and tropical plants added in the 1950s.

    Flora park was restored in 1987, and today contains an Italian Renaissance garden with hornbeam pergolas, cascade, and the (yet to be restored) Flora Temple, surrounded by gardens in the English landscape style, as well as a heather garden, fern garden, fragrance garden, Mediterranean garden, and pond. It also contains a number of notable trees, some dating to the garden's establishment; more than 60 specimens have been designated natural monuments.

  • Forstbotanischer Garten Köln
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Forstbotanischer Garten Köln

    The Forstbotanischer Garten Köln (25 hectares) is an arboretum and woodland botanical garden located at Schillingsrotterstraße 100, Rodenkirchen, Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It forms part of the city's outer green belt and is open daily without charge.

    The garden was created between 1962-1964 on a former military site which was, until the end of World War I, a part of the Äußerer Festungsring Köln, the outer ring of fortresses surrounding Cologne. Its ruins have been integrated into the plantings as a rock garden. In the 1980s, an adjoining natural area was created as the Friedenswald with additional tree plantings.

    Today the garden contains exotic and native trees. Of particular interest are the Rhododendron ravine, heather garden, peonies (Paeonia), Japanese plantings (including Acer palmatum, Cercidiphyllum, and Bambusoideae), and North American plantings (1.5 hectares, including Sequoiadendron giganteum, Pinus ponderosa, and Abies concolor). The Friedenswald (20 hectares) contains a large meadow surrounded by deciduous and coniferous forests containing trees and shrubs from all nations with which Germany has diplomatic relations; tropical and subtropical species are represented by symbolic trees.

  • Basilica of St. Severin, Cologne
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Basilica of St. Severin, Cologne

    The Basilica of St. Severin (Basilika St. Severin) is an early Romanesque basilica church located in the Südstadt of Cologne (Köln). The former collegiate church is dedicated to St. Severin of Cologne. It is one of the twelve Romanesque churches of Cologne.

    St. Severin was established in the late 4th century as a memorial chapel and extended several times. The oldest parts of today's building date back to the 10th century. It was designated a Basilica Minor by Pope Pius XII in 1953.

  • Cologne Cable Car
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne Cable Car

    The Cologne Cable Car (German: Kölner Seilbahn or Rheinseilbahn (Köln)) is a cableway that runs across the River Rhine in Cologne, Germany. It connects the two banks of the Rhine at the height of Cologne's Zoo Bridge (Zoobrücke).

  • Cologne City Hall
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne City Hall

    The City Hall (German: Rathaus) is a historical building in Cologne, western Germany, located off Hohe Straße in the district of Innenstadt, set between the two squares of Rathausplatz and Alter Markt. It houses part of the city government, including the city council and offices of the Lord Mayor. It is Germany's oldest city hall with a documented history spanning some 900 years. The history of its council during the 11th century is a prominent example for self-gained municipal autonomy of Medieval cities.

    Today's building complex consists of several structures, added successively in varying architectural styles: they include the 14th century historic town hall, the 15th century Gothic style tower, the 16th century Renaissance style loggia and cloister (the Löwenhof), and the 20th century Modern Movement atrium (the Piazzetta). The so-called Spanischer Bau is an extension on Rathausplatz but not directly connected with the main building.

  • Cologne Opera
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne Opera

    The Cologne Opera (German: Oper der Stadt Köln or Oper Köln) refers both to the main opera house in Cologne, Germany and to its resident opera company.

    The opera house

    The current Oper der Stadt Köln was designed by the German architect, Wilhelm Riphahn. It was inaugurated on 8 May 1957 in the presence of Konrad Adenauer, then the Chancellor of Germany and a former mayor of Cologne. The first opera to be performed there was Carl Maria von Weber's Oberon. In June of that year the house saw its first world premiere, Wolfgang Fortner's Die Bluthochzeit. The following month the opera company of La Scala appeared there on tour with Maria Callas in La sonnambula.

    The house has a seating capacity of 1,300 and an orchestra pit which can accommodate 100 musicians. It is part of an arts complex on Offenbachplatz which includes the Schauspiel Köln (Cologne Playhouse), also designed by Wilhelm Riphahn and built in 1962. At the end of the 2009/2010 season, both theatres closed until 2013 for extensive refurbishment and redevelopment.

  • Cologne Ring
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne Ring

    The Cologne Ring (known in German as: Kölner Ringe) is a semi-circular, some 6 km long urban boulevard in Innenstadt, Cologne and the city's busiest and most prominent street system. The Cologne Ring is a four lane street and part of Bundesstraße 9.

    The ring road encircles the old town of Cologne on its Southern, Western and Northern boundaries on the site of the former mediaeval city wall. It divides Innenstadt into old town (Altstadt) east of it and new town (Neustadt) west of it. Most of the city wall has been worked away during the 1880s and only few sections of the wall exist today at Hansaring and Sachsenring. Of the once twelve mediaeval city gates, only the Eigelsteintorburg at Ebertplatz, the Hahnentor at Rudolfplatz and the Severinstorburg at Chlodwigplatz still stand today.

  • Cologne Rodenkirchen Bridge
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne Rodenkirchen Bridge

    The Cologne Rodenkirchen Bridge is a steelsuspension bridge over the Rhine located in Cologne, Germany. Completed in 1954, it has a main span of 378 metres. It was named after the Cologne district of Rodenkirchen.

  • Cologne Tower
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne Tower

    The Cologne Tower (KölnTurm) is the tallest office building in Cologne at 148.5 m (487 ft) tall (165.48 m (542.9 ft) including antenna). Construction of the building lasted from June 1999 to November 2001. Due to its location in the Köln-Neustadt-Nord district, near Cologne's MediaPark, the tower primarily serves as an office building for various companies in the media sector.

    The Cologne Tower is the second-tallest skyscraper in North Rhine-Westphalia (after the Post Tower in Bonn) and the twelfth tallest in Germany.

    The observation deck and restaurant, located on the 30th floor, were opened to the public in June 2006.

  • Cologne Zoological Garden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cologne Zoological Garden

    The Aktiengesellschaft Cologne Zoological Garden is the zoo of Cologne, Germany. It features over 7,000 animals of more than 700 species on more than 20 hectares. The internationally renowned zoo with an attached aquarium and invertebrate exhibit has an emphasis on primates such as bonobos and lemurs, and is active in preservational breeding of animals that are in danger of becoming extinct. In addition, in-the-wild conservation efforts and research focussing on animals of Madagascar, the Wallacea, and Vietnam are actively promoted and supported via cooperation with Cologne University and local projects, such as in the case of Przewalski's Horses.

    The zoo was founded in 1860. The world wars led to a phase of stagnation, and the zoo had to close for two years entirely, after virtually being destroyed in World War II. It reopened in 1947; the aquarium was added in 1971. In 1985, the large primate house, one of the main attractions, was opened. Today, the zoo also features a free-flight rainforest hall with free-ranging birds and reptiles opened in 2000, and as the latest addition a large elephant park.

  • Colonia-Haus
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Colonia-Haus

    Colonia-Haus is a 45-storey, 147 m (482 ft) skyscraper completed in 1973 in the Riehl district of Cologne, Germany. Upon completion in 1973, it was the tallest residential-only building in Europe until the 2001 completion of the KölnTurm, and remains the tallest residential-only building in Germany. Colonia-Haus has 45 floors with 373 units including 352 one-and multi-room apt-flats in size from 35 to 118 m2 (380 to 1,270 sq ft) on floors 3 to 41.

    Appearance

    The skyscraper was known by its advertising slogan of Colonia, with the insurance group, the Cologne Colonia recruited who was acquired in 1997 by the AXA Group. Accordingly it was replaced in 1998 the advertising slogan at the highest point of the house by AXA, with the name of the house remained unchanged.

  • Colonius
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Colonius

    Colonius is the Cologne telecommunications tower, which was finished in 1981. The Colonius possesses a cafeteria, viewing platform, and a restaurant, apart from antennas for radio relay and radio services within the VHF range. Because of a missing leaseholder, the visitor's area including restaurant and viewing platform is currently closed (as of 2009). At the time of its completion the Colonius was 252.9 meters high. In 2004 a radio tower added by helicopter increased the height to 266 meters. This addition allowed the broadcast of digital television (DVB-T) from the tower in the Cologne/Bonn region.



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Travel Insider Tips for Cologne

Cologne Overview

Founded by the Romans in 38 B.C., Cologne (Köln) lies on the Rhine river, and is the largest city in North Rhine-Westphalia. Besides visiting the awesome Gothic Cathedral, visitors will want to explore the city’s even older Romanesque churches, as well its vibrant arts scene, which includes 30 museums, hundreds of galleries, and music to suit every taste. The famous Cologne Carnival—one of the biggest street festivals in all of Europe—reaches its high point every year on the Thursday before Ash Wednesday.

Cologne (German: Köln) is Germany's fourth-largest city (after Berlin (Berlin vacation rentals | Berlin travel guide), Hamburg (Hamburg vacation rentals | Hamburg travel guide) and Munich), and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than ten million inhabitants. It is one of the oldest cities in Germany, having been founded by the Romans in the year 38 BC.

Cologne lies on the River Rhine. The city's famous Cologne Cathedral (Kölner Dom) is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Cologne. The University of Cologne (Universität zu Köln) is one of Europe's oldest universities.

Cologne is a major cultural center of the Rhineland and has a vibrant arts scene. Cologne is home to more than 30 museums and hundreds of galleries. Exhibitions range from local ancient Roman archeological sites to contemporary graphics and sculpture. The city's Trade Fair Grounds are host to a number of trade shows such as the Art Cologne Fair, the International Furniture Fair (IMM) and the Photokina. Cologne is also well-known for its celebration of Cologne Carnival, the annual reggae summerjam, and the gay/lesbian pride festival Christopher Street Day (CSD).

Within Germany, Cologne is known as an important media center. Several radio and television stations, including Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR), RTL and VOX, are based in the city. Pro7 also produces many shows in Studios in Cologne (i.E. TV Total). The city also hosts the Cologne Comedy Festival, which is considered to be the largest comedy festival in mainland Europe.

In 2005 Cologne hosted the 20th Roman Catholic World Youth Day with Pope Benedict XVI.

Cologne is the fourth-largest city in Germany in terms of inhabitants after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich (Munich vacation rentals | Munich travel guide). Officially, the city still has somewhat fewer than a million inhabitants (as of 31 December 2006: 989,766). However, this might change rapidly as the city's registration rules will change in the course of 2007. Cologne is the center of an urban area of around 2 million inhabitants (including the neighboring cities of Bonn (Bonn vacation rentals | Bonn travel guide), Hürth (Hürth vacation rentals | Hürth travel guide), Leverkusen (Leverkusen vacation rentals | Leverkusen travel guide), and Bergisch-Gladbach).

Carnival in Cologne

Cologne carnival is one of the biggest street festivals in Europe. In Cologne, the carnival season officially starts on 11 November at 11 minutes past 11 a.m. with the proclamation of the new Carnival Season, and continues until Ash Wednesday. But the so-called "Tolle Tage" (mad days) don't start until Weiberfastnacht (Women's Carnival) or, in dialect, Wieverfastelovend (Thursday before Ash Wednesday), which is the beginning of the street carnival. Hundreds of thousands of visitors flock to Cologne during this time. Generally, around a million people are celebrating in the streets on the Thursday before Ash Wednesday.

Things to See

The center of Cologne was completely destroyed during World War II. The reconstruction of the city followed the style of the 1950s, while respecting the old layout and naming of the streets. Thus, the city today is characterized by simple and modest post-war buildings, with few interspersed pre-war buildings which were reconstructed due to their historical importance. Some buildings of the "Wiederaufbauzeit" (era of reconstruction), for example the opera house by Wilhelm Riphahn, are nowadays regarded as classics in modern architecture. Nevertheless, the uncompromising style of the opera house and other modern buildings has remained controversial.

  • Cologne Cathedral (German: Kölner Dom) is the city's famous landmark and unofficial symbol. It is a Gothic church, started in 1248, and completed in 1880. In 1996, it was designated a World Heritage site; it houses the Shrine of the Three Holy Kings that supposedly contains the relics of the Three Magi. Residents of Cologne sometimes refer to the cathedral as "the eternal construction site" (Dauerbaustelle).
  • Twelve Romanesque Churches: These buildings are outstanding examples of medieval sacral architecture. The roots of some of the churches date back as far as Roman times, like St. Gereon, which originally was a chapel on a Roman graveyard. With the exception of St. Maria Lyskirchen all of these churches were very badly damaged during World War II. Reconstruction was only finished in the 1990s.
  • Cologne University, with approx. 44,000 students as of 2005, is the largest university in Germany.
  • Farina Fragrance museum, the birthplace of Eau de Cologne.
  • Römisch-Germanisches Museum (English: Roman-Germanic Museum) for ancient Roman and Germanic culture.
  • Wallraf-Richartz Museum for medieval art.
  • Museum Ludwig for modern art.
  • EL-DE Haus, the former local headquarters of the Gestapo houses a museum documenting the Nazi rule in Cologne with a special focus on the persecution of political dissenters and minorities.
  • Kölner Philharmonie - the Cologne Philharmonic Orchestra Building housing both the Gürzenich Orchestra and the WDR Symphony Orchestra Cologne.
  • RheinEnergieStadion, the major Cologne stadium, primarily used for soccer games, seating 50,997 visitors in national games and 46,134 in international games, home to the local first division (Bundesliga) team, 1.FC Köln.
  • Lanxess Arena (formerly known as Kölnarena), a multifunctional event hall, home to the local hockey team, the Kölner Haie (English: Cologne Sharks).
  • Kölnturm (English: Cologne Tower), Cologne's second tallest building at 165.48 metres (542.91 ft) in height, second only to the Colonius (266 m/873 ft).
  • Colonius - a telecommunication tower with an observation deck (closed since 1992).
  • Colonia Hochhaus - Germany's tallest residential building.
  • Köln Triangle Tower - opposite the cathedral with a 103 m (338 ft) high viewing platform - in contrast to the cathedral with an elevator and a view with the cathedral over the Rhine.
  • Hansa Hochhaus - designed by architect Jakob Koerfer and completed in 1925, it was at one time Europe's tallest office building.
  • Rheinseilbahn - an aerial tramway crossing the Rhine.
  • Messe Köln (English: Cologne Fair). Exhibition area of 100,000 m2 (1,076,000 sq ft).
  • Messeturm Köln (English: Exhibition Tower Cologne).
  • Hohe Strasse (English: High Street) is one of the main shopping areas and extends past the cathedral in an approximately southerly direction. This street is particularly popular with tourists and contains many gift shops, clothing stores, fast food restaurants and electronic goods dealers.
  • Ford Motor Company plants, assembling the Ford Fiesta and Ford Fusion as well as manufacturing engines and parts; headquarters for Ford of Europe.
  • The Panasonic Toyota Racing Formula One team has its factory in the city.
  • Schildergasse - extends the shopping area of Hohe Strasse to the west ending at Neumarkt.
  • Ehrenstrasse - the shopping area around Apostelnstrasse, Ehrenstrasse, and Rudolfplatz is a little more on the eccentric and stylish side.
  • Historic Ringe boulevards (such as Hohenzollernring, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Ring, Hansaring) with their medieval city gates (such as Hahnentorburg on Rudolfplatz) are also known for their night life.
  • German Sports & Olympic Museum, with exhibitions about sports from antiquity until the present.
  • Chocolatemuseum officially called Imhoff-Schokoladenmuseum.
  • JavaMuseum - Forum for Internet Technology in Contemporary Art - collections of Internet based art.

[ source: Wikipedia ]

More about the History of Cologne

The first urban settlement on the grounds of what today is the center of Cologne was Oppidum Ubiorum, which was founded in 38 BC by the Ubii, a Germanic tribe. Cologne became acknowledged as a city by the Romans in 50 AD by the name of Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium.

ologne lost its status as a free city during the French period. According to the Peace Treaty of Lunéville (1801) all the territories of the Holy Roman Empire on the left bank of the Rhine were officially incorporated into the French Republic (which already had occupied Cologne in 1798). Thus, this region later became part of Napoleon's Empire. Cologne was part of the French Département Roer (named after the River Roer, German: Rur) with Aachen (Aachen vacation rentals | Aachen travel guide) (Aix-la-Chapelle) as its capital. The French modernized public life, for example by introducing the Napoleonic code and removing the old elites from power. The Napoleonic code remained in use on the left bank of the Rhine until 1900, when a unified civil code (the Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch) was introduced in the German Empire. In 1815, at the Congress of Vienna, Cologne was made part of the Kingdom of Prussia, first in the Jülich-Cleves-Berg province and then the Rhine province.

After World War II, nearby Düsseldorf (Düsseldorf vacation rentals | Düsseldorf travel guide) was chosen as the political capital of the Federal State North Rhine-Westphalia instead of Cologne even though it was the largest city in the region. With Bonn (Bonn vacation rentals | Bonn travel guide) being chosen as the provisional capital and seat of the government of the Federal Republic of Germany, Cologne benefited by being sandwiched between the two important political centers of the former West Germany. The city became home to a large number of Federal agencies and organizations. After re-unification in 1990 Berlin (Berlin vacation rentals | Berlin travel guide) was made the Federal capital of Germany.

Founded by the Romans in 38 B.C., Cologne (Köln) lies on the Rhine river, and is the fourth largest city in Germany. Besides visiting the awesome Gothic Cathedral, visitors will want to explore the city’s even older Romanesque churches, as well its vibrant arts scene, which includes 30 museums, hundreds of galleries, and music to suit every taste. The famous Cologne Carnival—one of the biggest street festivals in all of Europe—reaches its high point every year on the Thursday before Ash Wednesday. The city's Trade Fair Grounds are host to a number of trade shows such as the Art Cologne Fair, the International Furniture Fair (IMM) and the Photokina. As the center of a large urban area (over 2 million persons), something can be found to suit every taste in arts, entertainment, and other activities in Cologne.

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