[ source: Flickr ]

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Previously asked Dresden questions and answers:

Here is a list of Dresden questions that were already answered by our local residents and property owners. Please browse through them. In case you still have a question that is not answered here please use the form above.

Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

"A group of 15 will be in Dresden next week. We are especially interested in Dresden Frauenkirche and the statue of Luther. Is there any record that Luther visited Dresden? If so, is there any specific work attributed to his time there?" (posted 06/16/2014)

With the help of some historians, I have again looked into the history of the Luther monument. There is no historical reference to this monument. The year 1885 on the monument has no meaning. It was the date of installation, and it was set up only as a symbol of the spreading of the Reformation throughout Saxony and the support of the Reformation by the rulers of Saxony. There is no plaque on the monument. There is no more information. Best regards from Dresden, Brigitte Utz and Karl-Heinz Clauss
Answer provided by Brigitte Utz on 06/22/2014
This answer is helpful

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

"Hi, I am traveling to Berlin next week and would like to spend a couple of days in Dresden. What is the best way to travel to Dresden from Berlin? I am also planning to visit Cologne, Weimar and possibly Leipzig. What is the best itinerary and how long should I spend in each city? I only have 5 days." (posted 05/22/2014)

Hello, you can easily take the train to get from Berlin to Dresden. Dresden is the most beautiful city in Germany; you absolutely must stay for at least 3 days. Dresden has a wonderful location, on both sides of the river Elbe. Dresden features magnificent Baroque architecture with many museums and restaurants and entertainment options. and the city is planned so that you can reach all the sights on foot. From Dresden you must also go to Meissen, with the first European porcelain, and visit the Saxon Switzerland, the only sandstone mountains of Europe. Visiting Germany, you just have to plan to stay in this city the longest.
Answer provided by Rolf Schreiber on 05/23/2014
This answer is helpful
Best and cheapest option to get to Berlin is by long-distance buses, e.g. Flixbus or meinFernbus24 (cost around 10 Euro per trip). For 5 days, you are planning to go to too many towns. Head for Berlin, Leipzig and Dresden. All are connected by buses, the trip times aren’t so long, and they are all big cities. If you went to more cities, you would spend most of the time on the road.
Answer provided by Michael Zesch on 05/23/2014
This answer is helpful

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

"Are there any local food specialties in Dresden one should try out?" (posted 09/02/2014)

There are of course a number sächsicher specialties that you can experience the best on wikipedia. Must be translated. Tip are: Sächsicher Sauerbraten Saxon potato soup with sausages spots (tripe) - not for everyone, more Mediterranean Saxon beer goulash with dumplings (dumplings) S. cradle roast (Meatloaf several sorts of minced meat and many spices) cabbage (cabbage roulade) cake : Eierschecke, but many other regional versions cake
Answer provided by Dorothea Roggan on 09/04/2014
This answer is helpful

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

"Why should someone do a vacation in Dresden? Can you possibly tell me 2-3 popular travel tips for Dresden, which everyone visiting Dresden should see? Also let me know 2-3 special insider travel tips for Dresden that a typical tourist may not know about, but that you can highly recommend. Thanks!" (posted 09/02/2014)

Royal Palace with its museums. Schloss Pillnitz, Pfundt`s dairy, the most beautiful dairy shop in the world. Deutsches Hygiene Museum. Asisi Panometer.
Answer provided by Heinz Wassermann on 09/02/2014
This answer is helpful

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Dresden

  • Dresden Zoo
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Zoo

    Dresden Zoo, or Zoo Dresden, is a zoo situated in the city of Dresden in Germany. It was opened in 1861, making it Germany's fourth oldest zoo. It was originally designed by Peter Joseph Lenné.

    The zoo is located on the southern edge of the Großer Garten (Great Garden), a large city centre park. The zoo houses about 3000 animals of almost 400 species, especially Asian animals. It is a member of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) and the European Association of Zoos and Aquaria (EAZA).

    The zoo is served on its southern side by tram lines 9 and 13 of the Dresdner Verkehrsbetriebe, the local municipal transport company. On its northern side is the Zoo station of the Dresdner Parkeisenbahn, a minimum gauge railway through the Großer Garten that is largely operated by children.

  • State Museum of Zoology, Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    State Museum of Zoology, Dresden

    The State Museum of Zoology (German: Staatliches Museum für Tierkunde) in Dresden is a natural history museum that houses 10,000-50,000 specimens, including skeletons and large insect collections. Many are types. The collection suffered war damage and whilst catalogued the database is not computerized. Loans are possible and material can be studied in the collection. The address is Augustusstrasse 2, D-01067 Dresden, Germany. Curator: Axel Zarske.

  • Dresden City Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden City Museum

    Dresden City Museum (Stadtmuseum Dresden) is the central city museum for the German city of Dresden. Its displays tell the 800-year story of the city and is the largest and most important of the Dresden State Museums (Städtischen Museen Dresden). Its art collections split off in 2000 to form the Dresden City Art Gallery, but both the Art Gallery and the Museum are housed in Dresden's Landhaus.

    The Landhaus houses the Dresden City Museum. It was built between 1770 and 1776 and designed by Friedrich August Krubsacius using a mixture of baroque, rococo and classical elements. It was the seat of the Landtag of Saxony (Parliament of Saxony) from 1832 to 1907, when the Landtag was moved to the Ständehaus. The Landhaus is at edge of the Innere Altstadt between Wildstruffer and Landhaus streets, and between the Neumarkt and Pirnaischer Platz. The Polizeipräsidium and the Police Museum is next door. The Church of our Lady and the Kurländer Palais are also nearby. The Dresden Fortress Museum and the Albertinum are also nearby.

  • Dresden City Art Gallery
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden City Art Gallery

    The Dresden City Art Gallery (Städtische Galerie Dresden - Kunstsammlung) is the city art collection of Dresden, housed in the city's Landhaus. It was formed by the 19th and 20th century artworks in the Dresden City Museum, split off from the Museum and given a separate display in 2000. In 2002 Dr. Gisbert Porstmann became its founding director and in 2005 the City Art Gallery officially opened.

    At its opening, of Dresden City Art Gallery, ten artists: Franz Ackermann, Katalin Deér, Eberhard Havekost, Sabine Hornig, Kerstin Kartscher, Olaf Nicolai, Frank Nitsche, Manfred Pernice, Thomas Scheibitz, Silke Wagner, made available a first graphics Edition. The Dresden edition published an edition of 50 copies, of which 33 numbered for sale. For the archival storage of graphic papers and photographs was developed jointly with the German workshops Hellerau in a special wooden box. The price of the edition is 3424 €. All proceeds from the sale of the edition is the acquisition of contemporary art for the collection of the Städtische Galerie Dresden.

  • Dresden Transport Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Transport Museum

    The Dresden Transport Museum (German: Verkehrsmuseum Dresden) displays vehicles of all modes of transport, such as railway, shipping, road and air traffic, under one roof.

    The museum is housed in the Johanneum at the Neumarkt in Dresden. The Johanneum was built between 1586 and 1590; it is one of the oldest museum buildings in Dresden.

  • Botanischer Garten der Technischen Universität Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Botanischer Garten der Technischen Universität Dresden

    The Botanischer Garten der Technischen Universität Dresden (3.25 hectares), also known as the Botanischer Garten Dresden or Dresden Botanical Garden, is a botanical garden maintained by the Dresden University of Technology. It is located in the north-west section of the Großer Garten at Stübelallee 2, Dresden, Saxony, Germany. It is open daily without charge.

    Dresden has had a botanical garden since 1820 when Professor Ludwig Reichenbach created the first on a site now within the forecourt of the Police Headquarters, nearby the famous Brühl's Terrace. By 1822 it contained some 7,800 plant species and varieties. The contemporary garden was created in 1889 by Carl Georg Oscar Drude and officially opened in 1893. However, it was devastated in February 1945 during a World War II bombing. In 1949 it became a part of the Dresden University of Technology, and in 1950 reopened with partially restored outdoor gardens. In subsequent years administrative buildings and greenhouses have been rebuilt.

    Today the garden contains approximately 10,000 plant species, including unusual collections of annual plants (about 800 species) and wild plants from Saxony and Thuringia. It contains geographically arranged sections of plants from Asia, North America, etc., including the unusual Quercus phellos as well as Corydalis nobilis, Hamamelis, rhododendrons, magnolias, and so forth; a systematic section; an alpine garden collecting a variety of European high mountain plants, including gentian (Gentiana), species of saxifrage (Saxifraga), Dianthus caryophyllus, numerous cruciferous plants and primroses; and a garden that contains poisonous, curative, and medicinal plants.

    The garden also contains five greenhouses of about 1,000 m² total area, containing some 3,000 species, as well as an aquatic greenhouse for Victoria regia and plants from tropical America including Ananas comosus, Tillandsia usneoides, Theobroma cacao, epiphytic bromeliads, etc. The Great Tropical House (Paläotropis) contains tropical flora of Asia and Africa, including Cinnamomum verum, Coffea arabica, Elaeis guineensis, Ficus religiosa, Gossypium arboreum, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Musa acuminata, Pandanus, Piper nigrum, Platycerium, Saccharum officinarum, and Saintpaulia. The succulent house contains a Selenicereus grandiflorus and various cacti, succulents, orchids, and carnivorous plants.

  • Saxon State Library
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Saxon State Library

    The Saxon State Library (full name in German: Sächsische Landesbibliothek – Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Dresden), abbreviated SLUB Dresden, is located in Dresden, Germany. It is both the regional library (German: Landesbibliothek) for the German State of Saxony as well as the academic library for the Dresden University of Technology (German: Technische Universität Dresden). It was created in 1996 through the merger of the Saxon State Library (SLB) and the State and University Library Dresden (SUBD). The seemingly redundant name is to show that the library brings both these institutional traditions together.

    The SLUB moved into a large new building in 2002 to bring together the inventories of both its predecessors. Its collection numbers nearly nine million, making it one of the largest public archival centers in the Federal Republic of Germany. It holds significant treasures, including the Codex Dresdensis, an octagonal Koran from 1184 and a copy of the Peter Schoeffer Bible printed in 1462. Within the SLUB is the Deutsche Fotothek, holding some 2 million photographs from the past 80 years, and the German Stenographic Institute.

  • Deutsche Fotothek
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Deutsche Fotothek

    The Deutsche Fotothek (German pronunciation: [ˈdɔʏtʃə fotoˈteːk]) is a picture library in Dresden, Germany, located in the Saxon State Library. It holds more than two million images. Its strengths are in art, architecture, music, geography, technology, the economy, and the Saxony region. Its collection came from institutions, companies and individuals such as Hermann Krone.

  • German Hygiene Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    German Hygiene Museum

    The German Hygiene Museum (German: Deutsches Hygiene-Museum) is a museum in Dresden, Germany. It conceives itself today as a "forum for science, culture and society". It is a popular venue for events and exhibitions, and is among the most visited museums in Dresden, with around 300,000 visitors per year.

    Exhibitions, collection and other activities

    The museum's permanent features are the exhibition "Human Adventure" (Abenteuer Mensch), covering the human race, the body, and health in its cultural and social contexts, and a children's museum of the senses.

    The museum owns an extensive collection of around 45,000 items documenting the public promotion of bodily awareness and healthy day-to-day behaviour, mostly from the early 20th century onwards.

    There is a regular program of temporary exhibitions on social or scientific issues. Recent examples have included "Religious Energy", "What Is Beautiful?" and "War and Medicine". The museum also organises scientific and cultural events, including talks, meetings, debates, readings, and concerts.

  • Bundeswehr Military History Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bundeswehr Military History Museum

    The Bundeswehr Military History Museum (German: Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr (MHM)) is the military museum of the German Armed Forces, the Bundeswehr, and one of the major military history museums in Germany.

    The museum is under the technical and administrative chain of command of the German Armed Forces Military History Research Office. It is located in a former military arsenal in the Albertstadt neighborhood of Dresden. The museum includes the original Brandtaucher, the first German submarine, built in Kiel in 1850.

  • Dresden Panometer
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Panometer

    The Dresden Panometer is an attraction in Dresden, Germany. It is a panoramic painting inside a former gasometer, showing Dresden as it might have appeared in 1756, accompanied by an exhibition. The Panometer was created in 2006 by the Austrian-born artist Yadegar Asisi, who coined the name as a portmanteau of "panorama" and "gasometer". In 2003 he had opened a Panometer in Leipzig.

    Building

    The Dresden Panometer occupies a disused telescopic gas holder in Reick, built in 1879–80. The gasometer is 39 metres (128 ft) in height and 54 metres (177 ft) in diameter. Buildings of this type are particularly suitable for panoramic pictures due to their circular shape and ample interior space.

  • Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister

    The Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister (English: Old Masters Gallery or Old Masters Picture Gallery) in Dresden, Germany, displays around 750 paintings from the 15th to the 18th century. It includes major Italian Renaissance works as well as Dutch and Flemish paintings. Outstanding works by German, French and Spanish painters of the period are also among the gallery's attractions.

    The Old Masters are part of the Dresden State Art Collections. The collection is located in the Semper Gallery, the gallery wing of the Zwinger.

  • Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

    Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (English: Dresden State Art Collections) is a cultural institution in Dresden, Germany, owned by the State of Saxony. It is one of the most renowned and oldest museum institutions in the world, originating from the collections of the Saxon electors in the 16th century.

    Today, the Dresden State Art Collections consists of twelve museums. Most of them are located in the Dresden Castle, the Zwinger and the Albertinum.

  • Galerie Neue Meister
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Galerie Neue Meister

    The Galerie Neue Meister (English: New Masters Gallery) in Dresden, Germany, displays around 300 paintings from the 19th century until today, including works from Otto Dix, Edgar Degas, Vincent van Gogh and Claude Monet. The gallery also exhibits a number of sculptures from the Dresden Sculpture Collection from the same period. The museum's collection grew out of the Old Masters Gallery, for which contemporary works were increasingly purchased after 1843.

    The New Masters Gallery is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collections) of Dresden. It is located in the Albertinum.

  • Kupferstichkabinett, Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Kupferstichkabinett, Dresden

    The Kupferstichkabinett (English: Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs) is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collections) of Dresden, Germany. Since 2004 it has been located in Dresden Castle.

    Collection

    The collection includes over 500,000 items, only a fraction of which can be exhibited. The most renowned artists in the collection include Lucas Cranach the Elder, Albrecht Dürer, Jan van Eyck, Francisco de Goya, Hans Holbein the Younger, Michelangelo, Rembrandt, and Rubens. There is also a large number of works by artists with strong connections to Dresden, such as Caspar David Friedrich, Ludwig Richter, Georg Baselitz and Johannes Heisig. The collection of Käthe Kollwitz was started in 1898 and now numbers over 200 works from her oeuvre of drawings and graphics.

    Besides the permanent exhibition, the Kupferstichkabinett also hosts regular special exhibitions featuring both its own works and those on loan from other notable museums.

  • Gottleuba Dam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Gottleuba Dam

    The Gottleuba Dam is the second largest dam in Saxony. It serves as a reservoir for supply of water for Pirna and provides flood protection, but energy production is small. The dam was built between 1965 and 1974 and is located between Bad Gottleuba and Erzgebirge. It was under construction in 1974 and was completed in 1976. It dams up the Gottleuba (Czech: Rybný potok) river.

    Above the concrete dam is a lookout point. The dam is not accessible to the public. Bathing and leisure sport in the lake is not allowed, since it is for drinking water. Entry around the lake is allowed.

  • Semper Gallery
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Semper Gallery

    The Semper Gallery or Semper’s Building (German: Sempergalerie or Semperbau) in Dresden, Germany, was designed by the architect Gottfried Semper and constructed from 1847 until 1854.

    The long-stretched building in Neoclassical style closes the Zwinger courtyard on its northern side. It faces the Zwinger to the south; to the north it borders on the Theater Square (Theaterplatz) with the Semper Opera House as well as Dresden Castle and the Catholic Church of the Royal Court (Katholische Hofkirche).

    The Semper Gallery houses the Old Masters Picture Gallery (Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister) and the Armory (Rüstkammer).

  • Semperoper
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Semperoper

    The Semperoper is the opera house of the Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden (Saxon State Opera) and the concert hall of the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden (Saxon State Orchestra). It is located near the Elbe River in the historic center of Dresden, Germany.

    The opera house was originally built by the architect Gottfried Semper in 1841. After a devastating fire in 1869, the opera house was rebuilt, partly again by Semper, and completed in 1878. The opera house has a long history of premieres, including major works by Richard Wagner and Richard Strauss.

  • Münzkabinett
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Münzkabinett

    The Münzkabinett (English: Numismatic Cabinet) is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (Dresden State Art Collections). Founded around 1530, it is one of the oldest museums in Dresden. It is located in Dresden Castle.

    The Münzkabinett is one of the three largest numismatic collections in Germany. Its nearly 300,000 objects include coins from most countries of the world from antiquity to present day, historic and modern medallions, medals and insignia, historic bank notes and bonds, minting dies for coins and medals, seals, models, early forms of money, and minting machines and equipment. The Münzkabinett is a Landesmünzkabinett or official state collection, and has claim to any hoards of coins found on Saxon territory.

    The Münzkabinett is also a center of scholarly research and has a public library of some 30,000 volumes.

  • Skulpturensammlung
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Skulpturensammlung

    The Skulpturensammlung (English: Sculpture Collection) is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (Dresden State Art Collections). It is located in the Albertinum in Dresden.

    The collection of the Dresden Skulpturensammlung ranges in age more than five millennia, from classical antiquity to the art of the Renaissance, Baroque, and Expressionism until the 21st century. Sculptures from the likes of Polycletus to Giambologna and Permoser, and from Rodin to Lehmbruck are included in the collection.

  • Dresden Museum of Ethnology
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Museum of Ethnology

    The Museum of Ethnology Dresden (German: Museum für Völkerkunde Dresden) contains an ethnographic collection with more than 90,000 artefacts from all parts of the earth. It is part of the Dresden State Art Collections. Founded in 1875, the museum presents continually changing exhibitions in the Japanisches Palais, a Baroque building complex in Dresden, Germany.

    The collection has its origins in the cabinet of curiosities established by Augustus, Elector of Saxony in 1560.

  • Pillnitz Castle
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Pillnitz Castle

    Pillnitz Castle (German: Schloss Pillnitz) is a restored Baroque castle at the eastern end of the city of Dresden in the German state of Saxony. It is located on the bank of the River Elbe in the former village of Pillnitz. Pillnitz Castle was the summer residence of many electors and kings of Saxony; it is also known for the Declaration of Pillnitz in 1791.

    The Pillnitz Castle complex consists of three main buildings, the Riverside Palace (Wasserpalais) on the riverfront; the Upper Palace (Bergpalais) on the hillside, both Baroque with Chinoiserie elements; and the later Neoclassical New Palace (Neues Palais), which links them together on the east side. The buildings enclose a Baroque garden and are surrounded by a large public park.

    Today, the castle houses the Arts and Crafts Museum (Kunstgewerbemuseum) of the Dresden State Art Collections and a Palace Museum (Schlossmuseum).

  • The Catholic Church of the Royal Court of Saxony (Katholische Hofkirche)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    The Catholic Church of the Royal Court of Saxony (Katholische Hofkirche)

    Also known as the Cathedral of St. Trinitatis, the Hofkirche stands as one of Dresden's foremost landmarks. It was built by architect Gaetano Chiaveri from 1738 to 1751. The church was commissioned by Frederick Augustus II, Elector of Saxony and king of Poland, and contains the heart of his father, king August the Strong as well as the remains of 49 other members of the Wettin family as well as people who married into the family, such as Princess Maria Carolina of Savoy, wife of Anthony of Saxony who is also buried there.

    The church was badly damaged during World War II and was restored during the mid-1980s under the East German regime. Today it is the cathedral of the diocese of Dresden-Meißen. It has Silbermann's last and biggest organ and is the largest church in Saxony.

  • Semper Opera House
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Semper Opera House

    The Semper Opera is one of the most important historic buildings in Dresden and at the same time the most beautiful opera houses in the world. It is the home of the Saxon State Opera Dresden (German: Sächsische Staatsoper Dresden) and the concert hall of the Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden in Dresden, Germany. It was built in 1841 by architect Gottfried Semper; it is the only theater in Germany that bears the name of its architect.

    The building style itself is debated among many, as it has features that appear in the Early Renaissance style, Baroque and even features Corinthian style pillars typical of classical Greece (classical revival). Perhaps the most suitable label for this style would be Eclecticism, where influences from many styles are used- a practice most common during this period.

    The Semper Opera House displays incredible beauty inside as well. All rooms and corridors are richly decorated with paintings and stucco. The auditorium in the stalls and offers four tiers of seats for about 1,300 visitors. The acoustics are great at each place and will even surpass that of La Scala.

    Outside of both rehearsal and performance times, it is possible to take a guided tour in English on almost a daily basis for 8 &euro adults and 4 &euro concessions.

  • Dresdner Frauenkirche (Church of our Lady)

    The Frauenkirche is undoubtedly one of the most famous landmarks of Dresden. Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the firebombing of Dresden during World War II. It has been reconstructed as a landmark symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies. Once a month, an Anglican Evensong in English is held in the Church of Our Lady, with clergy sent from St. George's Anglican Chaplaincy in Berlin.

    The church may be visited during open hours with services, devotions, vespers and various other events, for free. Guided tours and a (strenuous) ascent to the Dome are available on a fee basis.

  • Zwinger Palace
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Zwinger Palace

    The Zwinger (Der Dresdner Zwinger) is a palace in Dresden and a major landmark of German baroque architecture. The location was formerly part of the Dresden fortress of which the outer wall is conserved. The name derives from the German word Zwinger (outer ward of a concentric castle); it was for the cannons that were placed between the outer wall and the major wall. The Zwinger was not enclosed until the neoclassical building by Gottfried Semper called the Semper wing was built to host the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister art gallery. The gallery is famous worldwide and boasts a fine collection of world masters including works by Albrecht Dürer, Hans Holbein, Lucas Cranach, Rafael and Tizian. The Zwinger also contains the Armoury (Rüstkammer), Porcelain Collection and Glockenspiel, Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon, and Zoological Museum.

    The Zwinger grounds are open daily from 6am - 11pm; museum hours and admission prices vary.

  • Garden City of Hellerau
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Garden City of Hellerau

    The Garden City of Hellerau, at that time a suburb of Dresden, was founded in 1909 according to the principles postulated by the British reformer Ebenezer Howard. It was built by renowned architects and artists, amongst them Hermann Muthesius, Heinrich Tessenow, Theodor Fischer and Wilhelm Kreis. In 1911 Tessenow built the Hellerau Festspielhaus (festival theatre) for the Swiss music educator Émile Jaques-Dalcroze and Hellerau became a centre of modernism with international standing until the outbreak of World War I. During the Third Reich, this area was infamous.

    In 1950 Hellerau was incorporated into the city of Dresden. Today the Hellerau reform architecture is recognized as exemplary. In the 1990's the garden city of Hellerau became a conservation area.

  • Dresden Castle
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Castle

    Dresden Castle (Dresdner Residenzschloss or Dresdner Schloss) is one of the oldest buildings in Dresden and has been the residence of the Electors (1547–1806) and Kings (1806–1918) of Saxony. One of the most fascinating qualities of the castle is the multitude of architectural styles found in it, from Romanesque to Baroque.

    Most of the castle was reduced to a roofless shell in an air attack in 1945. The Heraldic Room, Jewel Room, Silver Room and Bronze Room were all destroyed. Fortunately the collections survived, having been taken to the Königstein Fortress in the early years of the war. In the first 15 years after the end of the Second World War no attempts were made to restore the building except the installation of a temporary roof in 1946. During the 1960's, reconstruction began with the installation of new windows. Since then an amazing amount of restoration has occurred. The famous Grünes Gewölbe (Green Vault) was re-opened in 2005 containing, among other priceless items, the treasures of the Saxon Monarchy. The rebuilding of the castle is not yet complete.

    Hours: April to October: daily 10am - 6pm. November to March: daily 10am - 5pm.

    Admission: Adults 4 €, Concessions 2 €.

  • Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe)
    [ source: Germany Tourism ]

    Green Vault (Grünes Gewölbe)

    The famous Green Vault in Dresden – founded in around 1560 by Elector Augustus – is Europe's richest, most magnificent treasure chamber museum. Since it reopened in 2006, visitors to the Royal Palace can once again admire the collected treasures of the Electors and Kings of Saxony in an even more splendid setting.

    Treasure chamber of the Electors and Kings of Saxony: The secret repository comprising seven rooms was established ~ 1550. It is thought to have become known as the Green Vault after 1572 because of the malachite green on some of the architectural elements. The collection here includes masterpieces of jewelery and goldsmithery, exquisite amber and ivory treasures, jeweled vessels and elaborate bronze statuettes. The New Green Vault is on the first floor of the west wing; the Historical Green Vault is on the ground floor. The priceless treasures in the historical rooms are displayed on wall consoles and ornamental tables, allowing visitors to experience the splendors of the treasure chamber, in itself a baroque work of art, at close quarters.

    Hours: Open daily, except Tuesdays, from 10 am - 7pm (last admittance at 6 pm).

    Admission: For the old green vault, Please note that a ticket reservation is necessary.The number of visitors is restricted to 100 persons per hour with regard to the mode in which the exhibition is presented. Admission is at a fixed time, on the full and the half hour, with a time frame of 15 minutes. Fee: 12 € (incl. advance booking fee and audio-guide) per visitor,. There are no reductions except for children under 7 years and severly handicapped admitted free. The new green vault, does not require a reservation or ticket.

  • Saxon Fok Art Museum with Puppet Theatre Collection

    Saxon Fok Art Museum with Puppet Theatre Collection

    Opened in 1913, the Museum of Folk Art in Saxony is housed in Jägerhof Palace in Dresden Neustadt, just a stone's throw from the Elbe River. Spread across three floors, it gives a rich and varied insight into the region's customs and traditions. Items on display include: hand-crafted wooden furniture, metal-forged objects, tin castings, pottery, glass-blowing art, wood-turnings, carvings, miners' arts and crafts, lace and bobbin cloths from the Erzgebirge, traditional Sorbian costumes and Seiffen toys. The puppet theatre collection is one of the largest in the world, with over 50,000 exhibits from Europe and Asia. Exhibits range from 200-year-old marionettes and hand puppets used at local fairs, to characters used in Bauhaus theatre and modern-day figurative puppets. For a special treat, visit the museum's popular Christmas and Easter exhibitions.

    Hours: Closed on Mondays. Guided tours on request. Please note that the museum is closed Feb. - Nov. 2010 for remodeling.

    Admission: Adults 3 €, Concessions 2 €, Children under 16 years free.

  • Steamer trips on the Elbe
    [ source: Dresden ]

    Steamer trips on the Elbe

    Steamer trips on the Elbe are offered by the Saxon Steamship Company. With eight historical paddle steamers it possesses the oldest and largest fleet of paddle steamers in the world. Two modern salon ships complete the fleet. The section of the river covered stretches from Seusslitz near Meissen via Dresden to Decin (Czech Republic).

    The trips on offer include panorama cruises through the Saxon Switzerland and the Saxon Elbe Land, short cruises to Pillnitz Palace, city tours, jazz and Dixieland cruises, and summer-night cruises with dancing. Further attractions are afternoon coffee cruises with as much coffee and cake as you please, and special surprise tours, where the destination remains a secret until the steamer casts off.

    Check the Sächsische Dampfschiffahrts website for timetables and ticket prices.

  • Cable Railways
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cable Railways

    Because of its scenic beauty and magnificent view of the Elbe valley, the Elbe slopes in Loschwitz have always been one of Dresden's most favorite residential areas. Körnerplatz is the starting point for two cable railways: the aerial railway (Schwebebahn), which was built from 1898 until 1901, is considered the oldest aerial railway of the world and takes the passenger in four and a half minutes to the lookout point Schöne Aussicht. In the funicular railway (Standseilbahn) the day tripper reaches the popular restaurant Luisenhof in Weißer Hirsch, a part of the city that is situated 100 metres higher up than Körnerplatz.

    Fares/Times: Roundtrip fares are 4 € adults, 3 &euro concessions. Consult the website for timetables.

  • The Grand Garden of Dresden (Großer Garten)

    The Großer Garten (English: Great Garden) is a baroque style park in Dresden. It is oblong in shape and covers an area of about 2 km² in a central location of the city. Established in 1676 as a hunting preserve, it has been a public garden since 1814. Pathways and avenues are arranged symmetrically throughout its area. The Palace at the point where the avenues meet is a jewel of early Baroque. It is still used today for festive events in the middle of green surroundings. In the summer, the open-air stages and the puppet theater are always popular. Other attractions include the Botanical Garden and the zoo, while Volkswagen's manufacture of luxury cars in its Transparent Factory on the edge of the park is a symbol of the modern. For the journey into the wide landscape of experience, visitors young and old like to use the park railway, which is traditionally operated by Dresden schoolchildren.

  • Schloss Albrechtsberg (Dresden)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Schloss Albrechtsberg (Dresden)

    Albrechtsberg Castle (German: Schloss Albrechtsberg) is a Neoclassical castle above the Elbe river in the Loschwitz district of Dresden. It was erected in 1854 according to plans designed by the Prussian court and landscaping architect Adolf Lohse (1807–1867) at the behest of Prince Albert, younger brother of the Prussian king Frederick William IV.

    Adolf Lohse designed the castle in a late Neoclassical style that was very characteristic for the mid 19th century. During the interior completion just the most high class materials were used, for example marble, the most kingly wood and the white sandstone from Saxony. Deciding for the composition was the style of the classicism. For this style, especially important is the Grecian and Roman antiquity; the Italian Renaissance and its traditionally application. The guide for the composition of the castle was the Ville d'Este close to Rome.

    For the creation of the park, the Prussia garden architect Eduard Neide 1818-1883 was engaged. However, the court gardener Hermann Sigismund Neumann carried them out. Under the management of the court gardener, four landscapes were created. Those were crossed by curved alleys that are go over bridges an a viaduct. These alleys passe applied ponds, rocks and a waterfall.

  • Dresden City Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden City Museum

    Dresden City Museum (Stadtmuseum Dresden) is the central city museum for the German city of Dresden. Its displays tell the 800-year story of the city and is the largest and most important of the Dresden State Museums (Städtischen Museen Dresden). Its art collections split off in 2000 to form the Dresden City Art Gallery, but both the Art Gallery and the Museum are housed in Dresden's Landhaus.

    The Landhaus houses the Dresden City Museum. It was built between 1770 and 1776 and designed by Friedrich August Krubsacius using a mixture of baroque, rococo and classical elements. It was the seat of the Landtag of Saxony (Parliament of Saxony) from 1832 to 1907, when the Landtag was moved to the Ständehaus. The Landhaus is at edge of the Innere Altstadt between Wildstruffer and Landhaus streets, and between the Neumarkt and Pirnaischer Platz. The Polizeipräsidium and the Police Museum is next door. The Church of our Lady and the Kurländer Palais are also nearby. The Dresden Fortress Museum and the Albertinum are also nearby.

  • Dresden Transport Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Transport Museum

    The Dresden Transport Museum (German: Verkehrsmuseum Dresden) displays vehicles of all modes of transport, such as railway, shipping, road and air traffic, under one roof.

    The museum is housed in the Johanneum at the Neumarkt in Dresden. The Johanneum was built between 1586 and 1590; it is one of the oldest museum buildings in Dresden.

  • German Hygiene Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    German Hygiene Museum

    The German Hygiene Museum (German: Deutsches Hygiene-Museum) is a museum in Dresden, Germany. It conceives itself today as a "forum for science, culture and society". It is a popular venue for events and exhibitions, and is among the most visited museums in Dresden, with around 300,000 visitors per year.

    The museum's permanent features are the exhibition "Human Adventure" (Abenteuer Mensch), covering the human race, the body, and health in its cultural and social contexts, and a children's museum of the senses.

    The museum owns an extensive collection of around 45,000 items documenting the public promotion of bodily awareness and healthy day-to-day behaviour, mostly from the early 20th century onwards.

    There is a regular program of temporary exhibitions on social or scientific issues. Recent examples have included "Religious Energy", "What Is Beautiful?" and "War and Medicine". The museum also organises scientific and cultural events, including talks, meetings, debates, readings, and concerts.

  • Bundeswehr Military History Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bundeswehr Military History Museum

    The Bundeswehr Military History Museum (German: Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr (MHM)) is the military museum of the German Armed Forces, the Bundeswehr, and one of the major military history museums in Germany.

    The museum is under the technical and administrative chain of command of the German Armed Forces Military History Research Office. It is located in a former military arsenal in the Albertstadt neighborhood of Dresden. The museum includes the original Brandtaucher, the first German submarine, built in Kiel in 1850.

  • Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

    Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (English: Dresden State Art Collections) is a cultural institution in Dresden, Germany, owned by the State of Saxony. It is one of the most renowned and oldest museum institutions in the world, originating from the collections of the Saxon electors in the 16th century.

    Today, the Dresden State Art Collections consists of twelve museums. Most of them are located in the Dresden Castle, the Zwinger and the Albertinum.

  • Dresden Armory
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Armory

    The Dresden Armory (German: Rüstkammer), also known as the Dresden Historical Museum (German: Historisches Museum Dresden), is one of the world's largest collections of ceremonial weapons, armors and historical textiles. It is part of the Dresden State Art Collections.

    The Dresden Armory was on display in the Semper Gallery of the Zwinger Palace in Dresden until September 2012. In February 2013, the armory will re-open at its original location in the Dresden Castle.

    The Turkish Chamber (German: Türckische Cammer) is a separate collection within the Dresden Armory that is focused on art from the Ottoman Empire. It is already located in Dresden Castle.

  • Dresden Museum of Ethnology
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Museum of Ethnology

    The Museum of Ethnology Dresden (German: Museum für Völkerkunde Dresden) contains an ethnographic collection with more than 90,000 artefacts from all parts of the earth. It is part of the Dresden State Art Collections. Founded in 1875, the museum presents continually changing exhibitions in the Japanisches Palais, a Baroque building complex in Dresden, Germany.

    The collection has its origins in the cabinet of curiosities established by Augustus, Elector of Saxony in 1560.

  • Dresden Porcelain Collection
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Porcelain Collection

    The Dresden Porcelain Collection (German: Porzellansammlung) is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collections) of Dresden, Germany. It is located in the Zwinger Palace.

    The collection was founded in 1715 by the Saxon Prince-Elector Augustus the Strong, and was originally housed in the Japanese Palace (then known as the "Dutch Palace") on the banks of the Elbe. It moved into the Johanneum in 1876. The collection largely survived World War II thanks to evacuation, and moved into its current home in the south part of the Zwinger in 1962. Today the collection features 20,000 porcelain artefacts.

    One strength is the collection of traditional Chinese and Japanese porcelain acquired by Augustus the Strong. Above all this includes blue-and-white porcelain from the Ming and Qing Dynasties, in particular the "Dragoon Vases" acquired by Augustus from King Frederick William I in exchange for a regiment of dragoons. There are also colourful famille-verte and famille-rose items, white Dehua ceramics, Japanese Arita porcelain, and ceramics made especially for export.

  • Galerie Neue Meister
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Galerie Neue Meister

    The Galerie Neue Meister (English: New Masters Gallery) in Dresden, Germany, displays around 300 paintings from the 19th century until today, including works from Otto Dix, Edgar Degas, Vincent van Gogh and Claude Monet. The gallery also exhibits a number of sculptures from the Dresden Sculpture Collection from the same period. The museum's collection grew out of the Old Masters Gallery, for which contemporary works were increasingly purchased after 1843.

    The New Masters Gallery is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collections) of Dresden. It is located in the Albertinum.

  • Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister

    The Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister (English: Old Masters Gallery or Old Masters Picture Gallery) in Dresden, Germany, displays around 750 paintings from the 15th to the 18th century. It includes major Italian Renaissance works as well as Dutch and Flemish paintings. Outstanding works by German, French and Spanish painters of the period are also among the gallery's attractions.

    The Old Masters are part of the Dresden State Art Collections. The collection is located in the Semper Gallery, the gallery wing of the Zwinger.

  • Kupferstichkabinett, Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Kupferstichkabinett, Dresden

    The Kupferstichkabinett (English: Collection of Prints, Drawings and Photographs) is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen (State Art Collections) of Dresden, Germany. Since 2004 it has been located in Dresden Castle.

    Like many of Dresden's notable collections, this print room traces its origins to the Prince-electors of Saxony. The art chamber of the House of Wettin, established around 1560, became an independent museum of prints and drawings in 1720. The collection was expanded in the following centuries. It now describes itself as the oldest museum of graphic arts in the German-speaking world.

    The bombing of Dresden in February 1945 had a severe impact on the collection. Despite evacuation of the items, losses were high. Some of the most famous exhibits were confiscated by the Soviet Union after the war and did not return to Dresden until the late 1950s, when they were put back on display in the Albertinum.

  • Staatsschauspiel Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Staatsschauspiel Dresden

    The Staatsschauspiel Dresden is a theatre on Theaterstraße in Dresden. It is maintained by the Free State of Saxony, hence its name. It is made up of a main auditorium (the Schauspielhaus) and a studio theatre (the Kleine Haus). It was created in 1983 and housed in the old Staatstheater Dresden.

    Schauspielhaus

    The Staatstheater Dresden was built from 1911 to 1913 opposite the Zwinger, to Neo Baroque and Art Nouveau designs by William Lossow and his son Max Hans Kühne and with the support of the industrialist Karl August Lingner. It harmonised with the Zwinger's architecture, with arcades and baroque elements on its exterior. The new theatre's technical facilities (including hydraulically operated machinery for the new sliding scenery by technical director Adolf Linnebach) made it the most advanced theatre of its time.

    On 13 and 14 February 1945 the building was partially destroyed in the bombing of Dresden, but was rebuilt and reopened within three years, becoming the first German theatre to reopen post-war.

  • Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon

    The Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon (English: Royal Cabinet of Mathematical and Physical Instruments) in Dresden, Germany, is a museum of historic clocks and scientific instruments. Its holdings include terrestrial and celestial globes, astronomical, optical and geodetic devices dating back to the 16th century, as well as historic instruments for calculating and drawing length, mass, temperature and air pressure.

    The Mathematisch-Physikalischer Salon is part of the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (State Art Collections). It is located in the Zwinger.

  • Winterstein (Saxon Switzerland)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Winterstein (Saxon Switzerland)

    The Winterstein, also called the Hinteres Raubschloss, is an isolated, elongated rock massif in the hinterland of Saxon Switzerland in East Germany. On the summit there was once a medieval castle, also called Winterstein, of which remains such as rebates for timber beams, hewn-out steps and cisterns are still visible.

    The Winterstein is located in the almost unpopulated hinterland of Saxon Switzerland above the dry valley of the Großer Zschand with the crags of the Bärfangwänden in front of it. A few kilometres to the east along the Großer Zschand is the Zeughaus ("armoury"). West of the Winterstein runs the Kleiner Zschand valley, overshadowed by the massif of the Großer Winterberg. Immediately in front of the rock massif to the south is the free-standing climbing pinnacle of Wintersteinwächter.

  • State Museum of Zoology, Dresden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    State Museum of Zoology, Dresden

    The State Museum of Zoology (German: Staatliches Museum für Tierkunde) in Dresden is a natural history museum that houses 10,000-50,000 specimens, including skeletons and large insect collections. Many are types. The collection suffered war damage and whilst catalogued the database is not computerized. Loans are possible and material can be studied in the collection. The address is Augustusstrasse 2, D-01067 Dresden, Germany. Curator: Axel Zarske.

  • Pillnitz Palace and Park

    Pillnitz is a delightful amalgamation of romantic river and vineyard scenery, an idyllic park and a trio of unique, fascinating buildings. The Upper Palace is set on the upper side of the park like a reflection of the impressive Riverside Palace. Both buildings offer a blend of late baroque and Chinoiserie styles. The two Asian-style palaces stand either side of the New Palace built by architect Christian Friedrich Schuricht. Its most enchanting interior features include the domed hall in the purest of classical styles and the decorative wall and ceiling paintings. Together, the three buildings form an impressively harmonious architectural ensemble.

    But the most beautiful aspect of Pillnitz is its wonderful park, which has remained true to its original design as a pleasure garden. Despite being continually altered down the years, the 28-hectare grounds have lost nothing of their former splendour and stand as a vibrant and delightful monument to landscape gardening over the centuries. The forerunner to its intimate hedged gardens, a labyrinth of trimmed hornbeams just opposite the New Palace, was designed by the unfortunate Countess of Cosel herself.

    The Weinbergkirche (Vineyard Church) is a charming building with a high hip roof that rises impressively out of the vines. The most scenic route to Pillnitz Palace is by boat along the river Elbe, as in the era of Augustus the Strong. One glimpse of the building's reflection in the water will take you back in time to the glittering days of baroque splendor.

    Hours and Admission vary by attraction.

  • Saxon Switzerland National Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Saxon Switzerland National Park

    The Saxon Switzerland National Park (German: Nationalpark Sächsische Schweiz), is a National Park in the German Free State of Saxony near the capital city of Dresden. It covers two areas of 93.5 km² (36.1 mi²) in the heart of the German part of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains which is called the Saxon Switzerland (German: Sächsische Schweiz).

    The National Park is the centre of a natural area of almost 710 km² (274 mi²). This region is called Saxon Switzerland and is cultivated by humans in many places. Some smaller towns and villages like Bad Schandau or Königstein in the district of Sächsische Schweiz are part of this region.

    The core area of the National Park has a quiescent area of 40% and is covered almost completely by forest. The status of National Park, which grants the highest natural protection in Germany, was established in 1990. It lies – in two geographically separate areas – within the district of Sächsische Schweiz-Osterzgebirge.

  • Saxon Switzerland National Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Saxon Switzerland National Park

    The Saxon Switzerland National Park (German: Nationalpark Sächsische Schweiz), is a National Park in the German Free State of Saxony near the capital city of Dresden. It covers two areas of 93.5 km² (36.1 mi²) in the heart of the German part of the Elbe Sandstone Mountains which is called the Saxon Switzerland (German: Sächsische Schweiz).

    The National Park adjoins the Bohemian Switzerland National Park (Czech: České Švýcarsko) in the Czech Republic.

  • Waldschlösschen Bridge
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Waldschlösschen Bridge

    The Waldschlösschen Bridge (German: Waldschlößchenbrücke or Waldschlösschenbrücke) is a bridge under construction across the river Elbe in Dresden. The bridge is intended to remedy inner-city traffic congestion. Its construction is highly controversial, as the Dresden Elbe Valley had been declared a UNESCO World Heritage site and UNESCO expressed strong concerns against the bridge, noting its intent to withdraw the World Heritage title if the bridge is built.[1] As a result of this project, the Dresden Elbe Valley was listed in 2006 as an "Endangered World Heritage Site" (one of two in Europe, the Medieval Monuments in Kosovo being the other one), and in 2009 became the second World Heritage Site to be de-listed.

    Although plans to build a bridge at this location have existed for a century, in 1996, in line with a revised traffic model, the Dresden City Council agreed to the project. After almost eight years of preparation for the process of obtaining planning permission, a public referendum on whether to build the bridge was held in 2005. This resulted in a majority voting for the bridge, but the City Council stopped the plans in April 2006 following the UNESCO complaint. The Free State of Saxony complained, and in March 2007, at a legal hearing, the Sächsisches Oberverwaltungsgericht (the state administrative high court) ruled in favour of the planned bridge. The ruling was described by Vice President of the German Bundestag Wolfgang Thierse as "a sad day for Germany".

    Construction stalled after an administrative court ruled in August 2007 that steps needed to be taken to ensure that the endangered lesser horseshoe bat was protected; it is possible that only around 650 remain in Germany, with some living near the site of the proposed bridge. German courts ruled in November 2007 that work could resume.

    On June 25, 2009 the World Heritage Commission of UNESCO voted to remove the status of world heritage site from the Dresden Elbe Valley because of the construction of the Waldschlösschenbrücke. It is the only time a European site has ever been delisted, and only the second in the world.

    The bridge was designed by ESKR: Eisenloffel and Sattler (engineers) and Kolb and Ripke (architects) who won the open competition in 1997.

  • Dresden Frauenkirche
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden Frauenkirche

    The Dresden Frauenkirche (German: Dresdner Frauenkirche, IPA: [ˈfʁaʊənˌkɪʁçə], Church of Our Lady) is a Lutheran church in Dresden, the capital of the German state of Saxony. It is considered an outstanding example of Protestant sacred architecture, featuring of one the largest the domes in Europe.

    Built in the 18th century, the church was destroyed in the bombing of Dresden during World War II. The remaining ruins were left as as an anti-war memorial, following decisions of local East-German leaders. The church was rebuilt after the reunification of Germany. The reconstruction of its exterior was completed in 2004 and its interior in 2005. The church was reconsecrated on 30 October 2005 with festive services lasting through the Protestant observance of Reformation Day on 31 October. It nowadays also serves as symbol of reconciliation between former warring enemies.

    Once a month, an Anglican Evensong is held in English, by reverends from the St. George's Anglican Chaplaincy.

  • Dresden University of Technology
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dresden University of Technology

    The Technische Universität Dresden (usually translated[1] from German as Dresden University of Technology and abbreviated TU Dresden or TUD) is the largest institute of higher education in the city of Dresden, the largest university in Saxony and one of the 10 largest universities in Germany with 36,066 students as of 2010.[2] The name Technische Universität Dresden has only been used since 1961; the history of the university, however, goes back nearly 200 years to 1828. This makes it one of the oldest colleges of technology in Germany, and one of the country’s oldest universities, which in German today refers to institutes of higher education which cover the entire curriculum. The university is member of TU9, a consortium of the nine leading German Institutes of Technology. The university is one of eleven universities which succeeded in all three rounds of the German Universities Excellence Initiative in 2012.



What is your insider travel tip for Dresden?

Travel Insider Tips for Dresden

Dresden Overview

Dresden is the capital city of the German Federal Free State of Saxony. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe. The Dresden conurbation is part of the Saxon Triangle metropolitan area.

Dresden has a long history as the capital and royal residence for the Electors and Kings of Saxony, who for centuries furnished the city with cultural and artistic splendor. The controversial bombing of Dresden in World War II by the United States Army Air Forces (the direct predecessor to the independent United States Air Force) and the Royal Air Force, 40 years in the Soviet bloc state of the German Democratic Republic, and contemporary city development has changed the face of the city broadly. Considerable restoration work has helped restore selective perspectives of the city.

Since German reunification in 1990, Dresden has re-emerged as a cultural, political and economic center in the eastern part of Germany.

Dresden lies on both banks of the river Elbe, mostly in the Dresden Elbe Valley Basin, with the further reaches of the eastern Ore Mountains to the south, the steep slope of the Lusatian granitic crust to the north, and the Elbe Sandstone Mountains to the east at an altitude of about 113 meters. The highest point of Dresden is about 384 meters in altitude.

With a pleasant location and a mild climate on the Elbe, as well as Baroque-style architecture and numerous world-renowned museums and art collections, Dresden has been called "Elbflorenz" (Florence of the Elbe). The incorporation of neighboring rural communities over the past 60 years has made Dresden the fourth largest urban district by area in Germany after Berlin (Berlin vacation rentals | Berlin travel guide), Hamburg (Hamburg vacation rentals | Hamburg travel guide), and Cologne (Cologne vacation rentals | Cologne travel guide).

The nearest German cities are Chemnitz (Chemnitz vacation rentals | Chemnitz travel guide) (80 km/50 miles to the southwest), Leipzig (Leipzig vacation rentals | Leipzig travel guide) (100 km/ 62 miles to the northwest) and Berlin (200 km/ 124 miles to the north). The Czech capital Prague is about 150 km/ 93 miles to the south; the Polish city of Wrocaw is about 200 km/ 124 miles to the east.

Greater Dresden, which includes the neighboring districts of Kamenz, Meißen, Riesa-Großenhain, Sächsische Schweiz, Weißeritzkreis and part of the district of Bautzen (Bautzen vacation rentals | Bautzen travel guide), has a population of around 1,250,000 .

[ source: Wikipedia ]

Things to See

Dresden is a very beautiful, light-spirited city, especially in summer, when you can appreciate the serene setting of the historic center. Although Dresden is larger than Munich (Munich vacation rentals | Munich travel guide) when measured by area, the historic center is quite compact and walkable. Be sure to check out these places while in Dresden.

  • Zwinger Palace: The baroque palace features a nympheum, many sculptures of Permoser, a bell pavilion and famous art collections. Do not miss the "Alte Meister" - you'll find the famous Madonna Sistina of Rafael there including the well known angels. There is also a very nice museum on the arms of Saxon kings, the "Rüstkammer".
  • Semperoper: The building is well worth visiting, as it is one of the most beautiful opera houses in the world. The acoustics and the orchestra, the Staatskapelle, are marvelous. Its history saw many operas of Wagner and Strauss having their first nights there. Nowadays productions are of lower quality and follow the German "Regietheater" fashion. Make sure to inquire about the production in advance, or you might have unpleasant surprises. Make sure to also book tickets in advance. Some last-minute tickets are available from the box office shortly before the performance starts. Seats which do not have a good view are very cheap, and you can sit on benches behind the seats, right at the top of the auditorium, for free. When there is no rehearsal or performance, the opera offers an interesting tour behind the scenes (7 euro, 3.50 euro reduced and a 2 euro photography pass, but they don't check if you have it).
  • Frauenkirche: The reconstructed Church of Our Lady was completely destroyed during WWII, and has now been reopened. The City of Coventry, which was raided by the Luftwaffe in WWII, donated the golden cross for the dome of the church. Check out some ruins in the basement. Do not miss the tower visit and bring good shoes to climb in (otherwise you will not be admitted in!).
  • Fürstenzug: This biggest porcelain painting of the world shows (almost) all Saxon princesses and kings on their horses and splendid parade uniforms. It leads to the "Stallhof" - the last preserved tournament place contained in a European castle. In winter it is the location of a very romantic Christmas market with a big fireplace.
  • Albertinum Museum: The collections of "Neue Meister" (New Masters) feature a wonderful collection ranging from romantic painters (Caspar David Friedrich etc.) up to Rotloff and Van Gogh.
  • Gläserne Manufaktur: Lennestr. 1, 01069 Dresden, Mon-Sun 8AM-8PM, tel. 018-05-89-6268, infoservice@glaesernemanufaktur.de. The transparent factory is the site where Volkswagen builds its luxury sedan Phaeton. There is a tour (English language) offered by Volkswagen (4 euro, 2 euro reduced).
  • Schloss und Grünes Gewölbe: The Green Vault is Europe's most splendid treasure chamber museum. You can see the biggest green diamond and the court of Aurengzeb and its precious crown jewels.
  • Staatliche Kunstsammlungen: This website provides a comprehensive overview of all important museums in Dresden
  • Kassematten under the Brühlsche Terrasse (the terrace at the Elbe river) are the remains of the old fort. Gives you a glimse of what a fort in a medieval European town was like.
  • Schwebebahn Dresden - a unique aerial tramway.
  • Museum of Mineralogy: One of Dresden's most important museums.
  • Dresden History Museum
  • Neue Synagoge, Hasenberg 2.

[ source: Wikipedia ]

More about the History of Dresden

Although Dresden is a younger city of Slavic origin,] the area had been settled in the Neolithic era by Linear Pottery culture tribes ca. 7500 BC. Dresden's founding and early growth is associated with the eastward expansion of Germanic peoples, mining in the nearby Ore Mountains, and the establishment of the Margraviate of Meissen (Meissen vacation rentals | Meissen travel guide). Dresden later evolved into the capital of Saxony.

Dresden in the 20th century was a leading European centre of art, classical music, culture and science until its complete destruction on 13 February 1945. Being the capital of the German state of Saxony, Dresden had not only garrisons but a whole military borough, the Albertstadt. This military complex, named after Saxon King Albert, was never targeted in the bombing of Dresden.

Dresden remains a major cultural center of historical memory, owing to the city's destruction in World War II. Each year on 13 February, the anniversary of the British and American fire-bombing raid that destroyed most of the city, tens of thousands of demonstrators gather to commemorate the event.

Dresden is the capital city of the German Federal Free State of Saxony. It is situated in a valley on the River Elbe. With a pleasant location and a mild climate, as well as Baroque-style architecture and numerous world-renowned museums and art collections, Dresden has been called "Elbflorenz" (Florence of the Elbe). The incorporation of neighboring rural communities over the past 60 years has made Dresden the fourth largest urban district by area in Germany after Berlin, Hamburg, and Cologne. While in Dresden, be sure to enjoy its many cultural sites, including the Zwinger, the Semperoper, the Frauenkirche, the Green Vault, and Pillnitz Palace and gardens.

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