[ source: Wikipedia ]

Have a question about Ilsenburg? Ask a local resident for special Ilsenburg insider tips ...

In case you have a specific question for Ilsenburg or would like a Ilsenburg insider tip from one of our local property owners and Ilsenburg experts. Simply add your question and enter your email address. You will typically receive responses from us soon, in many cases within less than 24 hours! Please note: We do not share your email address with with anyone. Responses will solely be sent from us.

I would like to also receive an occasional Live Like a German newsletter with special travel tips (at most once a month) and last minute Germany travel deals.
Thanks for submitting your question about Ilsenburg.
Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently one local expert assigned to Ilsenburg.

Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently more than local experts assigned to Ilsenburg.



Popular Points of Interest in and near Ilsenburg

  • Froschfelsen
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Froschfelsen

    The Froschfelsen ("Frog Rocks", 545 m above NN), also called the Froschsteinklippe, is a natural monument near Ilsenburg in the northern Harz in central Germany. It is a formation of granite rocks that take the shape of a frog, hence the name.

    The Froschfelsen is located on the Meineberg hill on the western side of the Ilse valley. It is a hiking destination and No. 5 in the system of checkpoints in the Harzer Wandernadel hiking network. The checkpoint is in a nearby refuge hut.

  • Harzer Wandernadel
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Harzer Wandernadel

    The Harzer Wandernadel (literally: "Harz Walking Badge") is a system of hiking badges based on a network of checkpoints in the Harz mountains in central Germany. The hiker (or mountain biker) can earn badges at different levels of challenge by walking to the various checkpoints in the network and stamping his or her passbook to record the visit. With 222 checkpoints in three federal states and across five districts in the Harz and with membership in five figures, the system has gained a following Germany-wide.

    Purpose

    The idea of the Wandernadel ("hiking badge") is to give those holidaying in the Harz a worthwhile goal to achieve and encourage them to stay for longer or return. It also aims to encourage those who live in the local area to go hiking and improve their fitness.

    In addition the system helps tourists and locals to get to know the many, varied and attractive sights and hiking trails in the Harz. To that end, checkpoints have been located at scenic viewing points, places of geological or botanical interest and locations that are either rich in culture or steeped in history. With a few exceptions, the checkpoints can only be reached on foot or bicycle.

  • Ilse valley
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Ilse valley

    The Ilse valley (German: Ilsetal) lies on the northern boundary of the Harz in Germany, running from the National Park town of Ilsenburg at the foot of the mountain range up to the source region of the Ilse river – near the summit of the legendary Brocken. Heinrich Heine, the famous German writer, described the Ilse valley with its little river and the rocks of the Ilsestein enthroned above it in what is now part of the Harz National Park.

    As one approaches the northern edge of the Harz, one can see its more prominent peaks. Between Goslar and Wernigerode, the mountains are especially striking, where their slopes rise steeply from the valley. Between the mountains of the Harz run deep gorges. These include those of the Ilse river as well as the parallel valleys of the Oker, Ecker and Bode.

    From 1830 to 1838 a country road was built, paid for by Count Henry of Stolberg-Wernigerode, from Ilsenburg via Spiegelslust through the Ilse valley, running past the Brocken to Schierke, which made it much easier for tourists to reach the higher mountain region. Today it is closed to the public.

    The Brocken (1,141 m above NN) can be climbed from Ilsenburg (250 m above NN) via the Heinrich Heine Way and the Plessenburg on a 15 kilometre long trail.

    In or near the Ilse valley are the following checkpoints on the Harzer Wandernadel hiking network (in downstream order with checkpoint numbers in brackets): Gelber Brink (22), Große Zeterklippe (10), Brockenhaus (9), Stempelsbuche (8), Bremer Hütte (6), Gasthaus Ilsestein (30) and Froschfelsen (5).

  • Ilsenburg Abbey
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Ilsenburg Abbey

    Ilsenburg Abbey (German: Kloster Ilsenburg) was a monastery of the Benedictine Order located at Ilsenburg near Wernigerode, in Saxony-Anhalt in Germany.

    The monastery was built on land given for the purpose in 1003 by Emperor Henry III to the Bishop of Halberstadt, and had been founded by 1009. In 1525 it was stormed, plundered and largely demolished by rebellious peasants; the monks were driven away, and did not return for several months.

    The Vögte, or lords protectors, were the Counts of Wernigerode until 1429, when on their extinction their inheritance passed to the Counts of Stolberg, who at the Reformation were supporters of Lutheranism. From 1549 onwards the monastery was subjected to severe changes, and in 1555 it became, with its properties and assets, part of the territorial possessions of the Counts.

    Part of the premises was used for a choral school, as in other monastic properties acquired by the Counts, and considerable re-building and improvements were made for the better accommodation of the function. The Counts' financial difficulties however caused the school to be suspended while the property was mortgaged, and although they regained it in 1608, and indeed lived there themselves for some years, the school finally closed in 1626.

    Today, the abbey site and the adjacent Ilsenburg House are managed by the Ilsenburg Abbey Foundation (Stiftung Kloster Ilsenburg).

  • Ilsenburg House
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Ilsenburg House

    Ilsenburg House (German: Schloss Ilsenburg) stands in the town of Ilsenburg (Harz) in the German state of Saxony-Anhalt and was given its present appearance in the 2nd half of the 19th century. The structure was built from 1860 onwards on the west and north sides of the Romanesque monastery of Ilsenburg Abbey. The stately home, designed in the Neo-Romanesque style, was the seat of the princes of Stolberg-Wernigerode until 1945. Since 2005, it has been owned by the Ilsenburg Abbey Foundation. In the future it is intended to make use of the house, together with the surviving, medieval cloisters (Klausurgebäude) of the monastery, as an art and cultural centre with overnight accommodation as well as a restaurant open to the public.

  • Ilsestein
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Ilsestein

    The Ilsestein, formerly also called the Ilsenstein, is a tourist attraction near the town of Ilsenburg in the Harz mountains of central Germany.

    The Ilsestein rises about 150 metres high over a little river, the Ilse, and lies at an elevation of 474 m above sea level.

    In the 10th century, there was a small siege castle on the Ilsestein immediately after the conversion of the old Ilsenburg castle into the Ilsenburg Abbey. It was destroyed around 1107 after lasting around a hundred years. Its layout was able to be reconstructed.

    On the summit, there is a crag on which Count Anton of Stolberg-Wernigerode had an iron cross erected on 18 October 1814, one year after the Battle of Möckern on the first day of the Battle of Leipzig. The cross commemorates his friends and relatives who fell in the German campaign of the Napoleonic Wars. There is a good view of the valley and of the Harz's highest mountain, the nearby Brocken.

    On 18 October 1913, a memorial plaque was unveiled here in the presence of Prince Christian Ernest of Stolberg-Wernigerode with an explanation of the origin of the 1814 iron cross.

  • Princess Ilse
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Princess Ilse

    Princess Ilse (German: Prinzess Ilse or Prinzeß Ilse) is the name of a popular tourist destination in the Ilse valley near the town of Ilsenburg in the Harz Mountains of central Germany. The spot was named after the River Ilse, which rises on the highest mountain in the Harz, the legendary Brocken, and flows through the romantic Ilse valley to Ilsenburg.

    As early as 1871 a hotel appeared in the Ilse valley by the name of Princess Ilse, which enjoyed great popularity. The timber-framed building burned down in 1887, but was rebuilt and extended several times. In 1978 it was completely torn down.

    Several hundred metres below the site of the old hotel there is still a spring, called Princess Ilse, from which a mineral spring flows.

    Prinzeß Ilse is also the title of a romantic play in five acts from the days of the old Celle dukedom, which appeareed in 1926 near Ströher in Celle and had been published by Karl Dassel and Karl Tolle.

    Prinzessin Ilse by contrast is the name of a fairy tale from the Harz by Marie Petersen, which first appeared in print in 1850. In this story, Princess Ilse loses her way whilst riding to the chase with her father, King Ilsing, and comes at nightfall to the gates of the fairy world, ruled by the fairy queen. The queen meets her kindly and invites her to the crystal palace.

    The legend was further reflected in Heinrich Heine's Die Ilse.

  • Ilsenburg House
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Ilsenburg House

    Ilsenburg House (German: Schloss Ilsenburg) stands in the town of Ilsenburg (Harz) in the German state of Saxony-Anhalt and was given its present appearance in the 2nd half of the 19th century. The structure was built from 1860 onwards on the west and north sides of the Romanesque monastery of Ilsenburg Abbey. The stately home, designed in the Neo-Romanesque style, was the seat of the princes of Stolberg-Wernigerode until 1945. Since 2005, it has been owned by the Ilsenburg Abbey Foundation. In the future it is intended to make use of the house, together with the surviving, medieval cloisters (Klausurgebäude) of the monastery, as an art and cultural centre with overnight accommodation as well as a restaurant open to the public.

    The Benedictine monastery in Ilsenburg was closed during the 16th century. The abbey site, including all its estates, were taken over by the counts of Stolberg who had exercised guardianship over the abbey since 1429 when the counts of Wernigerode died out. The secularised abbey estate was recognised by the prince-elector of Brandenburg, Frederick William I in 1687 as his property. During the 30 Years' War the castle of Wernigerode, occupied by Henry Ernest, had fallen into such a state, that he moved his court to Ilsenburg in September 1648. He moved into the dowager residence on the west side of the former abbey land that had been built between 1609 and 1615 by his cousin, Henry, for his wife, Adriane. Over the next six decades, Henry Ernest and his son, Ernest, ruled their county from the "Comital Stolberg House of Ilsenburg" (Gräflich Stolbergischen Hause Ilsenburg), as the family called the small stately home at that time. Count Ernest had the former abbey church redesigned around 1700. The high altar, pulpit and the baptismal angel (Taufengel) are examples of fine baroque wood carving and still demonstrate today the skill of the master craftsman who made them. In 1710 the counts of Stolberg-Wernigerode moved their seat back to Wernigerode again. The remaining cloisters were used for various purposes during the succeeding decades and comital officials moved into the surrounding buildings. Between 1861 and 1863 Count Otto of Stolberg-Wernigerode had the building above the Ilse extended as a residence for his uncle, Botho. In doing so, the Romanesque style of the monastic buildings was adopted again. The expansion was led by Karl Frühling, to whom Count Otto had entrusted the conversion of his castle in Wernigerode. From 1897 Ilsenburg was the dowager seat for Princess Anna of Stolberg-Wernigerode and her daughter, Elisabeth. In 1929 Prince Christian Ernest rented the house, the remains of the former cloisters and the adjacent park for 30 years to the Evangelical Church of the old-Prussian Union. After several renovations, in January 1930 the Ecclesiastical Mission Seminary (Kirchliches Auslandsseminar) began training theologians for mission abroad. Because the seminar was supported by the Confessional Church that resisted Nazification of the Protestant churches, it was dissolved in 1936. That same year the Old Prussian Evangelical Supreme Ecclesiastical Council (Evangelischer Oberkirchenrat, EOK) established a convalescent home for church workers in several of the rooms. Two years later an Evangelical Preaching Seminary was added. During the Second World War the house was also home to a military medical facility for reserves as well as a refugee camp. In May 1945 shortly before the war's end it was plundered and, several months later, the Stolberg-Wernigerode family were dispossessed. Its new owners, the municipality of Ilsenburg, struck a new agreement for its beneficial use with the Old Prussian Union. In addition to a College of Pastors and an Academy of Singing it also housed, in the years that followed, the Evangelical Academy of Research (Evangelische Forschungsakademie) founded in 1948. With the creation of the exclusion zone around the Inner German Border in 1961, all church activity had to cease and the Stasi took over the whole estate until 1972. From 1974 to 1990 a convalescent home was established in the building for employees of the Ministry for Rural Affairs and Food (Ministerium für Land- und Nahrungsgüterwirtschaft). From 1990 until its purchase by the Ilsenburg Abbey Foundation in 2005 it was used as an hotel.

  • Bremen Hut (Ilsenburg)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bremen Hut (Ilsenburg)

    The Bremen Hut (German: Bremer Hütte) in the Harz Mountains is a refuge hut and shelter in that part of the Harz National Park lying within the borough of Ilsenburg (Harz) in Harz district in the German state of Saxony-Anhalt.

    Location

    The Bremen Hut is situated in the High Harz inside the Harz National Park. It stands in the Ilse valley near the Upper Ilse Falls (Obere Ilsefälle) about half way as the crow flies between the town of Ilsenburg to the north-northwest, which lies on the northern rim of the Harz, and the Brocken to the south-southwest, at 1,141.1 metres above sea level the highest mountain in the Harz. To the west is the Scharfenstein (697.6 m) and to the east is the forest inn of Plessenburg (ca. 542 m). The hut itself is found at an elevation of 530 metres above sea level (NN).



What is your insider travel tip for Ilsenburg?

Travel Insider Tips for Ilsenburg

Ilsenburg is a town in the district of Harz, in Saxony-Anhalt in Germany. It is situated under the north foot of the Harz Mountains, at the entrance to the Ilse valley with its little river, the Ilse, a tributary of the Oker, about six 6 miles (9.7 km) north-west of the town of Wernigerode. It received town privileges in 1959. Owing to its surrounding of forests and mountains as well as its position on the edge of the Harz National Park, Ilsenburg is a popular tourist resort.

Ilsenburg is a town in the district of Harz, in Saxony-Anhalt in Germany. It is situated under the north foot of the Harz Mountains, at the entrance to the Ilse valley with its little river, the Ilse, a tributary of the Oker, about six 6 miles (9.7 km) north-west of the town of Wernigerode. It received town privileges in 1959. Owing to its surrounding of forests and mountains as well as its position on the edge of the Harz National Park, Ilsenburg is a popular tourist resort.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Ilsenburg

The old castle, Schloss Ilsenburg, lying on a high crag above the town, was originally an imperial stronghold and probably built by King Henry I. In 995 Emperor Otto III resided in Elysynaburg, which Henry II bestowed in 1003 upon the Bishop of Halberstadt, who converted it into a Benedictine monastery. The school attached to it enjoyed a great reputation towards the end of the 11th century. The abbey was finally devastated during the German Peasants' War in 1525.

After the Reformation the castle passed to the counts of Wernigerode, who restored it and made it their residence until 1710. Higher still, on the edge of the plateau rises the Ilsenstein, a granite peak standing about 500 ft (150 m) above the valley, crowned by an iron cross erected by Count Anton von Stolberg-Wernigerode in memory of his friends who fell in the Napoleonic Wars of 1813-1815. Around this rock cluster numerous legends.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Ilsenburg is a town in the district of Harz, in Saxony-Anhalt in Germany. It is situated under the north foot of the Harz Mountains, at the entrance to the Ilse valley with its little river, the Ilse, a tributary of the Oker, about six 6 miles (9.7 km) north-west of the town of Wernigerode. It received town privileges in 1959. Owing to its surrounding of forests and mountains as well as its position on the edge of the Harz National Park, Ilsenburg is a popular tourist resort.

Where to stay in Ilsenburg?

Check out our selection of hand-selected and quality Ilsenburg vacation rentals and holiday apartments.