[ source: Flickr ]

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Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

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Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

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What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

"Why should someone do a vacation in Karlsruhe? Can you possibly tell me 2-3 popular travel tips for Karlsruhe, which everyone visiting Karlsruhe should see? Also let me know 2-3 special insider travel tips for Karlsruhe that a typical tourist may not know about, but that you can highly recommend. Thanks!" (posted 09/02/2014)

The city of Karlsruhe is currently a construction site - in the city center, the tram is moved underground and so far the city is currently not particularly inviting. This makes the environment but up for it: Castle Bruchsal - Speyer - Castle Schwetzingen - Castle Rastatt with military history museum and porcelain castle Favorite - Baden-Baden - Old town of Ettlingen - Wissembourg in Alsace - the Southern Palatinate - World Heritage Monastery Maulbronn: everything within a radius of 40 km
Answer provided by Hannelore Hantsch on 09/02/2014
This answer is helpful

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

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Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

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Popular Points of Interest in and near Karlsruhe

  • Botanischer Garten Karlsruhe
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Botanischer Garten Karlsruhe

    The Botanischer Garten Karlsruhe is a municipal botanical garden located in Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is open daily except Monday; an admission fee is charged. This garden should not be confused with the nearby Botanischer Garten der Universität Karlsruhe operated by the University of Karlsruhe.

    The garden was established by Charles III William, Margrave of Baden-Durlach and designed by Carl Christian Gmelin. Between 1853 and 1857, three plant houses were created by architect Heinrich Hübsch. The buildings were severely damaged or destroyed in World War II, but reconstructed as follows: camellia and flower house, rebuilt 1952 for cactus and succulent exhibition; palm house, rebuilt 1955 to 1956; tropical house, restored in the 1950s. The grounds contain several rare trees from the 19th century amid newer plantings.

  • Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe

    Founded in 1989, the ZKM | Center for Art and Media Karlsruhe is a cultural institution which, since 1997, has been located in a historical industrial building in Karlsruhe, Germany that formerly housed a munitions factory. The ZKM organizes special exhibitions and thematic events, carries out research projects, produces works in the field of New Media and offers public as well as individualized communications and educational programs.

    The ZKM houses under one roof two museums, three research institutes as well as a media center; in this way it groups research and production, exhibitions and events, archives and collections. It works on the interface of art and science, and takes up cutting-edge insights in media technologies with the objective of developing them further. Since the death of founding director Heinrich Klotz (1935-1999), the ZKM has been directed by Prof. Peter Weibel. In addition to the ZKM, the associated Karlsruhe University of Arts and Design, as well as the Städtische Galerie Karlsruhe [Municipal Gallery Karlsruhe] are likewise housed in the former munitions factory.

  • Karlsruhe Palace
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Karlsruhe Palace

    Karlsruhe Palace (German: Karlsruher Schloss) was erected in 1715 by Margrave Charles III William of Baden-Durlach, after a dispute with the citizens of his previous capital, Durlach. The city of Karlsruhe has since grown around it.

    The first building was constructed by Jakob Friedrich von Batzendorf. The city was planned with the tower of the palace (Schloss) at the centre and 32 streets radiating out from it like spokes on a wheel, or ribs on a folding fan, so that a nickname for Karlsruhe in German is the "fan city" (Fächerstadt).

    Originally partially made of wood, the palace had to be rebuilt in 1746, using stone. Charles Frederick, Grand Duke of Baden then had the palace altered by Balthasar Neumann and Friedrich von Kesslau until 1770, adding larger windows and doors, pavilions and wings. In 1785, Wilhelm Jeremias Müller shortened the tower, adding a cupola.

  • Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Staatliche Kunsthalle Karlsruhe

    The Staatliche Kunsthalle (State Art Gallery) is an art museum in Karlsruhe, Germany.

    The museum, created by architect Heinrich Hübsch, opened in 1846 after nine years of work in a neoclassical building next to the Karlsruhe Castle and the Karlsruhe Botanical Garden. This historical building with its subsequent extensions now houses the part of the collection covering the 14th to the 19th century while the 20th century is displayed in the nearby building of the Botanical Gardens's former orangery.

    The museum notably displays paintings by Matthias Grünewald (most notably the Tauberbischofsheim altarpiece), Albrecht Dürer, Hans Baldung, Lucas Cranach the Elder, Hans Burgkmair, Rembrandt, Pieter de Hooch, Peter Paul Rubens, David Teniers the Younger, Hyacinthe Rigaud, Claude Lorrain, Nicolas Poussin, Jean-Baptiste Siméon Chardin, Eugène Delacroix, Gustave Courbet, Édouard Manet, Camille Pissaro, Claude Monet, Edgar Degas, Auguste Renoir, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, Caspar David Friedrich, Hans Thoma, Lovis Corinth, August Macke, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Erich Heckel, Franz Marc, Max Pechstein, Max Ernst, Kurt Schwitters, Juan Gris, Yves Tanguy, Robert Delaunay and Otto Dix.



What is your insider travel tip for Karlsruhe?

Travel Insider Tips for Karlsruhe

Karlsruhe Overview

Karlsruhe (population 288,917 in 2007) is a city in the south west of Germany, in the Bundesland Baden-Württemberg, located near the French-German border. Founded in 1715 as Karlsruhe Palace, the surrounding town became the seat of two of the highest courts in Germany, the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany (Bundesverfassungsgericht) whose decisions have the force of a law, and the Federal Court of Justice of Germany (Bundesgerichtshof) , the highest court of appeals in matters of civil law and criminal law. It therefore considers itself the home of justice in Germany, a role taken over from Leipzig (Leipzig vacation rentals | Leipzig travel guide) after 1933.

The city's altitude is between 100 m (on the western shore of the river Rhine) and 322 m (near to the TV Tower). Its geographical coordinates are [show location on an interactive map] 49°00′N 8°24′E / 49°N 8.4°E / 49; 8.4; the 49th parallel runs through the city center. Its course is marked by a stone and painted line in the Stadtgarten (city park). MiRO oil refinery

The city was planned with the tower of the palace (Schloss) at the center and 32 streets radiating out from it like spokes on a wheel, or ribs on a folding fan, so that a nickname for Karlsruhe in German is the "fan city" (Fächerstadt). Almost all of these streets survive today.

The city center was the oldest part of town and lies south of the palace in the quadrant defined by nine of the streets. The central part of the palace runs east-west, and there are two wings of the palace, each at a 45° angle to the center, so that they are pointing southeast and southwest (i.e. parallel with streets at the ends of the quadrant defining the city center).

The market place is on the street running south from the palace to Ettlingen (Ettlingen vacation rentals | Ettlingen travel guide). The market place has the town hall (das Rathaus) to the west, the main Protestant church (Evangelische Stadtkirche) to the east, and the tomb of Margrave Karl Wilhelm in a pyramid in the center. The architect Friedrich Weinbrenner designed many of the most important buildings. That is why Karlsruhe is one of only three large German cities in which building ensembles exist in Neoclassicism style.

The area north of the palace is a park and forest. East of the palace there originally were gardens and more forest, some of which remain, but the University, Wildparkstadion, and residential areas have since been built there. West of the palace is now mostly residential.

Things to See

The Durlacher Turmberg has a look-out tower (hence its name). It is a former keep dating back to the 13th century.

The Stadtgarten is a recreational area near the Hauptbahnhof (main railway station) and was rebuilt during the Bundesgartenschau (Federal Garden Show) in 1967. It is also the site of the Karlsruhe Zoo.

The Marktplatz with the stone pyramid marking the grave of the city's founding father. The pyramid, built in 1825, is the symbol of Karlsruhe. The city is nicknamed Die Fächerstadt (the fan city) because of its deliberate layout, with straight streets running out fan-like from the palace. The Karlsruhe Schloss (palace) is an interesting piece of architecture; the adjacent Schlossgarten, including the Botanical Garden with its palm, cactus and orchid house, invites a walk in the woods stretching out to the north of it.

The so called Kleine Kirche (Little Church), built between 1773 and 1776, is the oldest church of Karlsruhe's city centre.

Another sight is the Rondellplatz with its Constitution Building Columns (1826). It is dedicated to Baden's first constitution in 1818, which was one of the most liberal of this time. The Münze (mint), erected in 1826/27, was built by Weinbrenner too.

The St. Stephan parish church is one of the masterpieces of neoclassical church architecture in Southern Germany. Weinbrenner, who built this church between 1808 and 1814, orientated to the Pantheon, Rome.

The neo-gothic Grand Ducal burial chapel, built between 1889 and 1896, rather a mausoleum than a church, is located in the middle of the forest.

The main cemetery of Karlsruhe is the oldest park-like cemetery in Germany. The crematory was the first to be built in a church-like style.

In Karlsruhe is the Museum of Natural History, an opera house (the Baden State Theatre), as well as a number of independent theatres and art galleries. The State Art Gallery, built in 1846 by Heinrich Hübsch, displays paintings and sculptures from six centuries, particularly from France, Germany and Holland. Karlsruhe's newly renovated art museum is one of the most important art museums in Baden-Württemberg. Further cultural attractions are scattered throughout Karlsruhe's various incorporated suburbs. The Scheffel Association or Literary Society for example is a literary organisation and was established in 1924. It is the largest literary organisation in Germany.[citation needed] Today the Prinz-Max-Palais, built between 1881 and 1884 in historism style, houses the organisation including the museum. Breweries and art nouveau were predominant in the western city.

Due to the growth in inhabitants, Karlsruhe has developed several Vorstadt areas in Gründerzeit and especially Art nouveau architecture, plenty of them preserved.

In Karlsruhe there is the only art-ceramics manufacture in Germany, called Majolika-Manufaktur.[citation needed] Founded in 1901, it is located in the "Schlossgarten". A blue streak (Blauer Strahl) consisting of 1645 ceramic tiles connects the manufacture with the palace. It is the world's largest ceramic artwork.

Another tourist attraction is the ZKM (Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie) - Centre for Art and Media. Its collections are quite exceptional, since they combine art and modern technologies. The Centre is located in a converted ammunition manufactory.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Karlsruhe

The city takes its name from Margrave Karl III Wilhelm, Margrave of Baden-Durlach, who founded the city on June 17, 1715 after a dispute with the citizens of his previous capital, Durlach. The founding of the city is closely linked to the construction of the palace. Karlsruhe became the capital of Baden-Durlach and in 1771 of the united Baden until 1945. Built in 1822, the "Ständehaus" was the first parliament building in a German State. In the aftermath of the democratic revolution, a republican government was elected here.

Much of the central area, including the Schloss, was reduced to rubble by Allied bombing during World War II but was rebuilt after the war.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Karlsruhe (population 288,917 in 2007) is a city in the south west of Germany, in the Bundesland Baden-Württemberg, located near the French-German border. Founded in 1715 as Karlsruhe Palace, the surrounding town became the seat of two of the highest courts in Germany, the Federal Constitutional Court of Germany (Bundesverfassungsgericht) whose decisions have the force of a law, and the Federal Court of Justice of Germany (Bundesgerichtshof) , the highest court of appeals in matters of civil law and criminal law. It therefore considers itself the home of justice in Germany, a role taken over from Leipzig after 1933.

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