[ source: Wikipedia ]

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Travel Insider Tips for Koblenz-Wallersheim

Koblenz-Wallersheim Overview

Wallersheim is a district of Koblenz (Koblenz vacation rentals | Koblenz travel guide) in the Rhineland Palatinate. Situated at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle rivers (hence its name, from Latin “confluencia”), Koblenz is more than 2000 years old and thus one of the most ancient cities in Germany. From here you can take roundtrip cruises down the Rhine and Moselle rivers, admiring the ancient castles and vineyards that line these ancient waterways; explore the Taunus mountain resort area; take a peaceful canoe-trip on the Lahn river; or explore the culture and nightlife of Cologne (Cologne vacation rentals | Cologne travel guide) and Frankfurt (Frankfurt vacation rentals | Frankfurt travel guide). Let one of our fully-equipped vacation apartments be your German “home-away-from-home”!

Wallersheim is a district of Koblenz, one of the oldest cities in Germany that celebrated its 2000th anniversary in 1992. It is located between the Kesselheim and Neuendorf (Neuendorf vacation rentals | Neuendorf travel guide) districts in the northern part of the city. The port of Rheinhafen Koblenz, just above Wallersheim (Wallersheim vacation rentals | Wallersheim travel guide), constitutes a major inland port in the region.

Things to See in Koblenz-Wallersheim

The storied history of Koblenz (Koblenz vacation rentals | Koblenz travel guide) has left us legacy of wonderful sights.

Fortifications

The defensive works in the city are extensive. They consist of strong forts crowning the hills encircling the town on the west and of the citadel of Ehrenbreitstein on the opposite bank of the Rhine. The old city was triangular in shape, two sides being bounded by the Rhine and Mosel rivers and the third by a line of fortifications.

Immediately outside the former walls lies the new central railway station connecting the Cologne-Mainz railway with the strategic line Metz-Berlin. The Rhine is crossed by a road bridge and, a mile above the town, by a beautiful bridge of two wide and lofty spans carrying the Berlin (Berlin vacation rentals | Berlin travel guide) railway referred to above. The Mosel is spanned by a Gothic freestone bridge of 14 arches, erected in 1344, and also by a railway bridge.

Until 1890, the city was divided into the Altstadt (old city) and the Neustadt (new city) or Klemenstadt. The Altstadt is densely built and has few wide streets and squares. In contrast, the Neustadt enjoys numerous broad streets and an attractive frontage to the Rhine.

Other Sights

In the more ancient part of Koblenz stands several buildings of historical interest. Prominent among these, near the point of confluence of the rivers, is the Basilica St. Kastor or Kastorkirche, dedicated to Castor of Karden, with four towers.

In the same area is the Liebfrauenkirche, a fine church (nave 1250, choir 1404-1431) with lofty late Romanesque towers; the castle of the electors of Trier (Trier vacation rentals | Trier travel guide), erected in 1280, which now contains the municipal picture gallery. There is also the family house of the Metternichs, where Prince Metternich, the Austrian statesman, was born in 1773. Equally noteworthy is the church of St. Florian, with a two towers façade from c. 1110.

In the modern part of the town lies the palace (Residenzschloss), with one front looking towards the Rhine, the other into the Neustadt. Among other curiosities, it contains some fine Gobelin tapestries. From it some pretty gardens and promenades (Kaiserin Augusta Anlagen) stretch along the bank of the Rhine, and in them is a memorial to the poet Max von Schenkendorf. A fine statue to the empress Augusta stands in the Luisenplatz. But of all public memorials the most striking is the colossal equestrian statue of the emperor William I of Germany, erected by the Rhine provinces in 1897 on a lofty and massive pedestal at the point where the Rhine and Mosel meet.

The former Jesuit College is a Baroque edifice by J.C. Sebastiani (1694-1698) serves as the current Town Hall. Near Koblenz is the Lahneck Castle near Lahnstein (Lahnstein vacation rentals | Lahnstein travel guide), open to visitors from April 1 to October 31. The city is close to the Bronze Age earthworks at Goloring, a possible Urnfield calendar constructed some 3000 years ago.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Koblenz-Wallersheim

Ancient Era

Around 1000 BC, early fortifications were erected on the Festung Ehrenbreitstein hill on the opposite side of the Mosel. In 55 BC Roman troops commanded by Julius Caesar reached the Rhine and built a bridge between Koblenz (Koblenz vacation rentals | Koblenz travel guide) and Andernach (Andernach vacation rentals | Andernach travel guide). About 9 BC, the Castellum apud Confluentes, was one of the military posts established by Drusus.

Middle Ages

With the fall of the Western Roman Empire, the city was conquered by the Franks and became a royal seat. After the division of Charlemagne's empire, it was included in the lands of his son Louis the Pious (814). In 837 it was assigned to Charles the Bald, and a few years later here Carolingian heirs discussed what was to become the Treaty of Verdun (843), by which the city became part of Lotharingia under Lothair I. In 860 and 922 Koblenz was the scene of ecclesiastical synods. At the former of these, held in the Liebfrauenkirche, took place the reconciliation of Louis the German with his half-brother Charles the Bald. The town was sacked and destroyed by the Normans in 882. Starting from 925, it became part of the eastern German Kingdom, later the Holy Roman Empire.

n 1018 the city, after receiving a charter, was given by the emperor Henry II to the archbishop and prince elector of Trier (Trier vacation rentals | Trier travel guide). It remained in the possession of his successors till the close of the 18th century and was their main residence since the 17th century. Emperor Conrad II was elected here in 1138. In 1198 in the nearby took place the battle between Philip of Swabia and Otto IV. In 1216 prince-bishop Theoderich von Wied donated to the Teutonic Knights part of the lands of the basilica and the hospital, which later became the Deutsches Eck.

In 1249-1254 Koblenz was surrounded with new walls by Archbishop Arnold II of Isenburg; and it was partly to overawe the turbulent townsmen that successive archbishops built and strengthened the fortress of Ehrenbreitstein that dominates the city.

Modern Era

As a member of the league of the Rhenish cities which took its rise in the 13th century. The Teutonic Knights founded the Bailiwick of Koblenz in or around 1231. Koblenz attained to great prosperity; and it continued to advance till the disasters of the Thirty Years' War occasioned a rapid decline. After Philip Christopher, elector of Trier, had surrendered Ehrenbreitstein to the French the town received an imperial garrison (1632), which was soon, however, expelled by the Swedes. They in their turn handed the city over to the French, but the imperial forces succeeded in retaking it by storm (1636).

In 1688 Koblenz was besieged by the French under Marshal de Boufflers, but they only succeeded in bombing the Old City (Altstadt) into ruins, destroying among other buildings the Old Merchants' Hall (Kaufhaus), which was restored in its present form in 1725. The city was the residence of the archbishop-electors of Trier from 1690 to 1801.

In 1786 the last archbishop-elector of Trier, Clemens Wenceslaus of Saxony, gave great assistance to the extension and improvement of the city, turning the Ehrenbreitstein into a magnificent baroque palace. After the fall of the Bastille in 1789, the city became, through the invitation of the archbishop-elector's chief minister, Ferdinand Freiherr von Duminique, one of the principal rendezvous points for French émigrés. The archbishop-elector approved of this because he was the uncle of the persecuted king of France, Louis XVI. Among the many royalist French refugees who flooded into the city were Louis XVI's two younger brothers, the Comte de Provence and the Comte d'Artois. In addition, Louis XVI's cousin, the Prince de Condé, arrived and formed an army of young aristocrats willing to fight the French Revolution and restore the Ancien Régime. The Army of Condé joined with an allied army of Prussian and Austrian soldiers led by Duke of Brunswick in an unsuccessful invasion of France in 1792. This drew down upon the archbishop-elector the wrath of the First French Republic; in 1794 Coblenz was taken by the French Revolutionary army under Marceau (who fell during the siege), and, after the signing of the Treaty of Lunéville (1801) it was made the capital of the new French départment of Rhin-et-Moselle. In 1814 it was occupied by the Russians. The Congress of Vienna assigned the city to Prussia, and in 1822 it was made the seat of government for the Prussian Rhine Province.

After World War I, France occupied the area once again. In retaliation against the French, the German populace of the city has insisted on using the more German spelling of Koblenz since 1926. During World War II it was the location of the command of Army Group B and like many other German cities, it was heavily bombed and rebuilt afterwards. Between 1947 and 1950, it served as the capital of Rhineland-Palatinate.

The Rhine Gorge was declared a World Heritage Site in 2002, with Koblenz marking the northern end.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Wallersheim is a district of Koblenz in the Rhineland Palatinate. Situated at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle rivers (hence its name, from Latin “confluencia”), Koblenz is more than 2000 years old and thus one of the most ancient cities in Germany. From here you can take roundtrip cruises down the Rhine and Moselle rivers, admiring the ancient castles and vineyards that line these ancient waterways; explore the Taunus mountain resort area; take a peaceful canoe-trip on the Lahn river; or explore the culture and nightlife of Cologne and Frankfurt. Let one of our fully-equipped vacation apartments be your German “home-away-from-home”!

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