[ source: Wikipedia ]

Have a question about Lübbecke? Ask a local resident for special Lübbecke insider tips ...

In case you have a specific question for Lübbecke or would like a Lübbecke insider tip from one of our local property owners and Lübbecke experts. Simply add your question and enter your email address. You will typically receive responses from us soon, in many cases within less than 24 hours! Please note: We do not share your email address with with anyone. Responses will solely be sent from us.

I would like to also receive an occasional Live Like a German newsletter with special travel tips (at most once a month) and last minute Germany travel deals.
Thanks for submitting your question about Lübbecke.
Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently one local expert assigned to Lübbecke.

Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently more than local experts assigned to Lübbecke.



Popular Points of Interest in and near Lübbecke

  • Wiehen Hills
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Wiehen Hills

    The Wiehen Hills (German: Wiehengebirge, also locally, just Wiehen) are a low mountain range in North Rhine-Westphalia and Lower Saxony in Germany. The hills run from west to east like a long finger away from the main upland area of the Lower Saxon Hills, beginning at the Weser River near Minden and terminating in the vicinity of Osnabrück. It is the northern apophysis of the German low mountain ranges in the northern lowlands. The highest mountain is the Heidbrink near Lübbecke with an altitude of 320 metres (1,050 ft).

  • St. Andrew's Church, Lübbecke
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    St. Andrew's Church, Lübbecke

    The present-day Evangelical-Lutheran parish church of St. Andrew (St. Andreas) in Lübbecke is one of the ancient parishes (Urpfarreien) of the Bishopric of Minden.

    The originally single-nave, cross-shaped building with a west tower was built, probably from 1160 to 1180, in the Romanesque style. In 1350 it was converted into a Gothic hall church by the addition of two side aisles. This change of style can still be clearly recognised in the interior of the church. As the inscribed stone dating to 1350 states in Latin "In the year 1350, when the plague came, when the Geisler was carried out and the Jews were killed, this church was extended." During restoration work in 1959–62 the remains of wall and ceiling paintings inside the church were uncovered, some of which dated to as early as the 13th century. The church's fittings include a cup-shaped Gothic baptismal font, a lifesize Christ on the cross made around 1200, and an organ casing from 1628, that was modified in 1642. In addition, a large number of epitaphs have been preserved. The tower is almost 70 metres high, making it one of the highest church towers in a town anywhere in Germany.

  • St. Catherine's Church, Lübeck
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    St. Catherine's Church, Lübeck

    St. Catherine Church in Lübeck is a Brick Gothic church which belonged to a former Franciscan monastery in the name of Saint Catherine of Alexandria. The Church was built in the early 14th century. It is part of the Lübeck world heritage and used as a museum church and exhibition hall by the Lübeck museums since 1980.

    The exhibits include a copy of Saint George and the Dragon made by Bernt Notke for Storkyrkan in Stockholms Gamla Stan, an Epitaph by Godfrey Kneller in memory of his father and another one by Tintoretto, the Resurrection of Lazarus.

    Some the former altars, like Hermen Rodes St. Luke altar, are on permanent exhibit in the St. Annen Museum in Lübeck.

    The facade is decorated with 20th-century clinker brick sculptures by Ernst Barlach and Gerhard Marcks.

  • Katharineum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Katharineum

    The Katharineum zu Lübeck is a humanistic gymnasium founded 1531 in the Hanseatic city Lübeck, Germany. In 2006 the 475th anniversary of this Latin school was celebrated with several events. The school uses the buildings of a former Franciscan monastery next to Saint Catherine Church, which was extended in the 1880s.

    At the Katharineum it is possible to choose Latin as the first foreign language. In year nine it is also possible to choose ancient Greek as the third foreign language.

    Thomas Mann, himself a student of the Katharineum, thought of this school when describing the school Hanno went to in the Buddenbrooks. Mann, who as a bad student had to resit two years, made it clear that he disliked the Katharineum by describing both the school and the teachers with strong sarcasm.



What is your insider travel tip for Lübbecke?

Travel Insider Tips for Lübbecke

Lübbecke ([ˈlʏbɛkə] ( listen); Westphalian: Lübke) is a town in northeast North Rhine-Westphalia in north Germany. This former county town lies on the northern slopes of the Wiehen Hills (Wiehengebirge) and has around 26,000 inhabitants. The town is in the Eastwestphalian district of Minden-Lübbecke (in the Regierungsbezirk of Detmold). Lübbecke was first mentioned in the records in 775 as hlidbek and was given town rights in 1279.

Lübbecke ([ˈlʏbɛkə] ( listen); Westphalian: Lübke) is a town in northeast North Rhine-Westphalia in north Germany. This former county town lies on the northern slopes of the Wiehen Hills (Wiehengebirge) and has around 26,000 inhabitants. The town is in the Eastwestphalian district of Minden-Lübbecke (in the Regierungsbezirk of Detmold). Lübbecke was first mentioned in the records in 775 as hlidbek and was given town rights in 1279.

Location

Lübbecke is located in northeast North Rhine-Westphalia, north of East Westphalia-Lippe (Ostwestfalen-Lippe), in the southwestern part of the district of Minden-Lübbecke. From a landscape perspective, the town lies in the west of the Minden Land. Geographically, most of the built-up area is on the North German Plain. Only its southern suburbs lie on the northern slope of the Wiehen Hills, whose crest that marks the southern boundary of the borough. The town itself lies on the edge of the hills, whils the rest of the borough is more rural in character. The northern boundary of the borough is defined by the Midland Canal (Mittelland Canal). In the northeast of the borough is the Großes Torfmoor which, together with the Oppenweher Moor, is the largest moor in Westphalia. Between the wet lowlands south of the Mittelland Canal, the glacial valley of the River Weser and the higher ground is a narrow fringe of fertile loess soils at the foot of the Wiehen Hills called the Lübbecker Lößland. The far north of the area is part of the Rahden-Diepenau Geest. In the geest there are only are the villages of Stockhausen and Alswede and part of Lübbecke industrial estate.

The highest hills in Lübbecke's territory are the Heidbrink (320 m), the Wurzelbrink (319 m) and the Kniebrink (315 m). Next to the town itself is the Reineberg (276 m), the Heidkopf (273 m) and the Meesenkopf (226 m). The hills in the south of the borough are the highest in the whole of the Wiehen ridge. In the north the land only attains a height of about 50 m. The lowest point is about 48 m.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Lübbecke

The settlement of Lübbecke was first mentioned in the records in 775 as hlidbek in the Frankish imperial annals. At that time Saxony attacked a Frankish camp. Lübbecke was the central site of the Saxon hlidbeki gau. In those days there may already have been a church in hlidbeki that dated back to the Saxon Angrivarii under their duke, Widukind, a tribe who had settled the region during the spread of Christianity under Charlemagne. Lübbecke was the center of a early church parish in the Diocese of Minden, and so the nobility who were native to the area as well as the knightly family in Lübbecke were ministeriales of the bishops of Minden. By 1279 Lübbecke had been given its town charter by the Minden Bishop Volquin of Schwalenberg. The area was also run by the bishops of Minden from the country castle of Reineburg (now Hüllhorst). The lords based there came mainly from the knightly family of Lübbecke. The Burgmann estates in Lübbecke were, in turn, enfeoffed by the castle. In 1806 twelve of these Burgmann estates were recorded in the borough. The Burgmannen also held a majority on the town council, which met in town hall, first mentioned in 1460.

From 1295 Lübbecke became part of a canonical church foundation. This was originally founded in 1274 in Ahlden an der Aller, but moved in 1280 to Neustadt am Rübenberge and in 1295 to Lübbecke to the St. Andrew's Church. It remained here until it was abolished in 1810. The foundation had 4 estates within the town. In 1549 the diocesan synod was held here under Bishop Franz von Waldeck.

In 1648 the now secular Principality of Minden (known prior to secularization as the Bishopric of Minden), to which the present borough belonged, went to Brandenburg-Prussia. The town hall burned down in 1705 and was rebuilt in 1709. In 1765 the Prussian government arranged the division of the marks which generated a large portion of the revenue of the town through the allocation of rights and the collection of hunting revenue. Lübbecke's protests against the mark division were unsuccessful.

Lübbecke's medieval fortifications were preserved up to the beginning of the 19th century. Due to the high cost of maintenance and their limited military value, the fortifications were razed in 1830 and the material used for construction, the walls being transformed into promenades.

Until the establishment of the de facto French Kingdom of Westphalia in 1807 and the introduction of French administrative structures, the Burgmann lords remained a major centre of power in Prussian Lübbecke and hindered the development of a patrician class. The middle class merchants were however always represented on the town council by six senatorial seats and provided a civic mayor, who presided over the town jointly with a noble mayor, but the nobility held the reins. The town hall regulations adopted in 1727 by the Prussian government institutionalized this 'diarchy' and envisaged only two senatorial seats. In the Kingdom of Westphalia Lübbecke became the canton capital in the Département du Weser and in the Distrikt of Minden and remained so even when this fell to France in 1811 (from 1811, the Département de l’Ems-Supérieur). In 1813 Lübbecke became Prussian again and, after belonging briefly to the Zivilgouvernement zwischen Weser und Rhine, became part of the Prussian Province of Westphalia. After extensive administrative reforms and the dissolution of the Principality of Minden, Lübbecke became part of the newly created Regierungsbezirk Minden and district of Rahden. In 1832 Lübbecke became the administrative seat of a new district combining Rahden with elements of the district of Bünde, which was renamed into Lübbecke district.

Like almost everywhere in Minden-Ravensberg the textile industry initially emerged in proto-industrial form and, later, was supported by the Prussian state with the construction of the Cologne-Minden Railway and its branch line from Bünde to Rahden, opened in 1899. The cigar industry developed into an important economic factor in Bünde Land and the surrounding towns, including Lübbecke, from about 1860. In 1863 August Blase founded a cigar factory, which had 6,000 employees by 1938. This included employees in its many branches, because just as before in the proto-industrial textile sector, cigars were often cut, rolled and pressed in the home or in stalls. These two branches of the economy - the textile and tobacco industries - are still represented in Lübbecke today, even though their influence now lags behind that of engineering and other industries. In 1907, the last section of the Minden District Railway to Lübbecke opened (running from Minden via Hille to Eickhorst in 1903). In the 1950s, the narrow gauge railway was converted from metre gauge to standard gauge due to the transport of goods. Operations were discontinued in 1974 and the track dismantled between Hille and Lübbecke. In 1912, the first houses were connected to the electrical supply from the Lower Saxon Power Stations. In 1899 the Gasfabrik am Hahlerbaum, a local gas company, was founded; the precursor to today's public utilities. From 1934 Lübbecke had a central water supply.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Lübbecke Westphalian: Lübke) is a town in northeast North Rhine-Westphalia in north Germany. This former county town lies on the northern slopes of the Wiehen Hills (Wiehengebirge) and has around 26,000 inhabitants. The town is in the Eastwestphalian district of Minden-Lübbecke (in the Regierungsbezirk of Detmold). Lübbecke was first mentioned in the records in 775 as hlidbek and was given town rights in 1279.

Where to stay in Lübbecke?

Check out our selection of hand-selected and quality Lübbecke vacation rentals and holiday apartments.