[ source: Flickr ]

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Previously asked Lübeck questions and answers:

Here is a list of Lübeck questions that were already answered by our local residents and property owners. Please browse through them. In case you still have a question that is not answered here please use the form above.

Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

"Your site responded brilliantly to our previous question. We would like to know what transport is available to get from Lubeck to Toulov in Denmark and what sites have the best info on what to do and see in and around Lubeck. We are keen to see Hamburg as well. Thank you, Vivienne." (posted 06/18/2014)

Toulow is located in the center of Denmark on the east coast, about 3 hours drive from the German border. It can certainly be reached by rail via Lübeck, Hamburg, possibly Flensburg. For information about Lübeck city and region, contact the Lübeck-Travemünde Lübeck information or the Tourist Information. Sincerely, Irmgard Kirsten
Answer provided by Irmgard & Rolf Kirsten on 06/19/2014
This answer is helpful

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Lübeck

  • Holstentor
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Holstentor

    The Holsten Gate ("Holstein Tor", later "Holstentor") is a city gate marking off the western boundary of the old center of the Hanseatic city of Lübeck. This Brick Gothic construction is one of the relics of Lübeck’s medieval city fortifications and the only remaining city gate, except for the Citadel Gate ("Burgtor"). Because its two round towers and arched entrance are so well known it is regarded today as a symbol of this German city, and together with the old city centre (Altstadt) of Lübeck it has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987.

    Appearance

    The Holsten Gate is composed of a south tower, a north tower and a central building. It has four floors, except for the ground floor of the central block, where the gate’s passageway is located. The side facing west (away from the city) is called the “field side”, the side facing the city the “city side”. The two towers and the central block appear as one construction when viewed from the city side. On the field side, the three units can be clearly differentiated. Here the two towers form semicircles which at their widest point extend 3.5 metres beyond the central block. The towers have conical roofs; the central block has a pediment.

  • Elbe–Lübeck Canal
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Elbe–Lübeck Canal

    The Elbe-Lübeck Canal (also known as "Elbe-Trave Canal") is an artificial waterway in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It connects the Elbe and Trave rivers, hence constituting an accessway from the Elbe to the Baltic Sea. It is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long; the northern terminus is Lübeck, the southern terminus is the town of Lauenburg. The town of Mölln is along the canal.

    The predecessor was the Stecknitz Canal, built under Eric IV, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg, between 1390 and 1398, making it one of the oldest artificial waterways of Europe. This canal connected the tiny rivers Stecknitz (tributary of the Trave) and Delvenau (tributary of the Elbe). It was a part of the Old Salt Route. The Stecknitz Canal was 85 centimetres (33 in) deep, 7.5 metres (24 ft 7 in) wide and 94 kilometres (58 mi) long. The canal included 17 wooden locks (of which the Palmschleuse at Lauenburg still exists) that mananged the 13-meter altitude difference between its endpoints and the highest central part, the Delvenaugraben.

    According to authors David Kirby and Merja-Liisa Hinkkanen, "the journey (along the Stecknitz) often lasted up to fourteen days, due to the number of locks and the inadequacy of the towpath. A number of plans for a new Baltic–North Sea canal were floated in the 17th century, but none came to fruition."

    In 1900 the original Stecknitz canal was replaced by the present Elbe-Lübeck Canal. It was partly laid out using the Stecknitz, the Delvenau and the old canal. The canal bed was generally straightened, thus reducing the length to the current 67 km figure.

  • Elbe–Lübeck Canal
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Elbe–Lübeck Canal

    The Elbe-Lübeck Canal (also known as "Elbe-Trave Canal") is an artificial waterway in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It connects the Elbe and Trave rivers, hence constituting an accessway from the Elbe to the Baltic Sea. It is 67 kilometres (42 mi) long; the northern terminus is Lübeck, the southern terminus is the town of Lauenburg. The town of Mölln is along the canal.

    The predecessor was the Stecknitz Canal, built under Eric IV, Duke of Saxe-Lauenburg, between 1390 and 1398, making it one of the oldest artificial waterways of Europe. This canal connected the tiny rivers Stecknitz (tributary of the Trave) and Delvenau (tributary of the Elbe). It was a part of the Old Salt Route. The Stecknitz Canal was 85 centimetres (33 in) deep, 7.5 metres (24 ft 7 in) wide and 94 kilometres (58 mi) long. The canal included 17 wooden locks (of which the Palmschleuse at Lauenburg still exists) that mananged the 13-meter altitude difference between its endpoints and the highest central part, the Delvenaugraben.

    According to authors David Kirby and Merja-Liisa Hinkkanen, "the journey (along the Stecknitz) often lasted up to fourteen days, due to the number of locks and the inadequacy of the towpath. A number of plans for a new Baltic–North Sea canal were floated in the 17th century, but none came to fruition."

    In 1900 the original Stecknitz canal was replaced by the present Elbe-Lübeck Canal. It was partly laid out using the Stecknitz, the Delvenau and the old canal. The canal bed was generally straightened, thus reducing the length to the current 67 km figure.

  • The Holsten Gate and Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    The Holsten Gate and Museum

    Lübeck's Holstentor gate is one of the best known German buildings worldwide. Built in 1464, from its beginnings the Holstentor served both Lübeck's defence and its prestige - a massive double-towered city gate. Above the round-arched gateway entrance is the Latin inscription in golden letters: CONCORDIA DOMI FORIS PAX (unity at home and peace abroad). The monument as we see it today is the result of considerable restoration work: in the mid 19th century it was more or less a ruin. In 1863, with a majority of just one single vote, the city parliament decided to restore the gate and began restoration efforts, the last of which were carried out from 2004-2006.

    Inside this historic monument the Holstentor Museum puts the history of Lübeck's hanseatic trade links, its power and its wealth on display. Exhibits such as historical ship models, suits of armor, weapons, legal instruments, and articles of merchandize offer many exciting discoveries to the visitors. The exhibition "The Power of Trade" - Die Macht des Handels - thus illustrates the success story with which the merchants of medieval Lübeck put their city firmly on the international map.

  • Hanseatic City of Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Hanseatic City of Lübeck UNESCO World Heritage Site

    Lübeck's Old Town is the first Old Town in Germany ever officially declared a UNESCO Cultural World Heritage Site. It is the former capital and Queen City of the Hanseatic League* and was founded in the 12th century and prospered until the 16th century as the major trading center for northern Europe. It has remained a center for maritime commerce to this day, particularly with the Nordic countries. Despite the damage it suffered during the Second World War, the basic structure of the old city, consisting mainly of 15th- and 16th-century patrician residences, public monuments (the famous Holstentor brick gate), churches and salt storehouses, remains unaltered.

    *The Hanseatic League (also known as the Hanse or Hansa) was an alliance of trading cities and their guilds that established and maintained a trade monopoly along the coast of Northern Europe, from the Baltic to the North Sea and inland, during the Late Middle Ages and early modern period (c.13th–17th centuries). The Hanseatic cities had their own law system and furnished their own protection and mutual aid.

  • Bay of Lübeck
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bay of Lübeck

    The Bay of Lübeck (German: Lübecker Bucht) is a basin in the southwestern Baltic Sea, off the shores of German lands of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern and Schleswig-Holstein. It forms the southwestern part of the Bay of Mecklenburg.

    Main ports: Lübeck with its borough Travemünde at the mouth of river Trave. The Elbe-Lübeck Canal connects the Baltic Sea with the Elbe.

  • Bay of Mecklenburg
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bay of Mecklenburg

    The Bay of Mecklenburg (German: Mecklenburger Bucht or Mecklenburgische Bucht; Danish: Mecklenburg Bugt), also known as the Mecklenburg Bay or Mecklenburg Bight, is a long narrow basin making up the southwestern finger-like arm of the Baltic Sea, between the shores of Germany to the south and the Danish islands of Lolland, Falster, and Møn to the north, the shores of Jutland to the west, and joining the largest part of the Baltic to the east.

    The Bay of Mecklenburg, which includes the Bay of Wismar and the Bay of Lübeck, connects to the Bay of Kiel in the northwest. Notable ports in the bay are Lübeck, Rostock and Wismar.

  • Liubice
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Liubice

    Liubice, also known by the German name Alt-Lübeck ("Old Lübeck"), was a medieval West Slavic settlement near the site of modern Lübeck, Germany. Liubice was located at the confluence of the Schwartau with the Trave across from Teerhof Island, approximately four kilometres north of Lübeck's island old town. The residence of Henry, the Christian prince of the Obotrites, Liubice was destroyed after his death by the pagan Rani of Rugia.

    Archaeological findings in the 1970s indicated that Liubice was older than previously thought. The oldest wall dates back to 819, while further sections of the wall date to 1055 and 1087. Dendrochronological date indicates two repairs on the wall and activity inside of the castle in 1002 and 1035. The stone church, discovered in 1852, was preceded by a wooden church. Plaiting and block construction were found scattered inside the ruins of the castle complex.

  • Bay of Wismar
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bay of Wismar

    The Bay of Wismar or more commonly Wismar Bay or Wismarbucht is a well sheltered multi-sectioned bay in the southwestern Baltic Sea, in Germanys' Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, and is considered the south-central part of the much larger arm of the Baltic known as the Mecklenburg Bay (or Mecklenburg Bight, for its long narrow bent shape)— a long fingerlike gulf oriented to the west-southwest (WSW) from the (central) Baltic proper. Wismar bay is considered one of the finest natural harbors on the Baltic, and served as the destination for much seaborne shipping until circa the 1910s when its minimum depths of 5 meters (16 ft) became too shallow for larger more modern ships. Today, because of the shallow sheltered waters the bay is the subject of much research via underwater archeology

    There are four lobe like parts of the Bay of Wismar which are themselves bays on its southern shores, each separated by a north intruding headland from the others (see maps at right) and a broad channel running northwest to southeast parallel to the line formed by the tips of the four bounding headlands. The tips of the four headlands are remarkably well aligned and very closely co-linear spanning 10.80 mi (17.38 km) northwest to southeast tip to tip along the channel along which the inlets are respectively Boltenhagen Bay, Wohlenberger Wiek, Eggers Wiek, and the inner bay. A channel, the Breitling between Poel island and the mainland is accounted part of the bay as well, which in its northern limit is the north shore of the island.

  • Lübeck Museum of Theatre Puppets
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Lübeck Museum of Theatre Puppets

    The Lübeck Museum of Theatre Puppets (in German: "TheaterFigurenMuseum Lübeck") is a museum of international puppetry in the Hanseatic city of Lübeck, Germany.

    Fritz Fey Jr's private TheaterFigurenMuseum Lübeck is hidden in a narrow street called Kolk situated close to the Holstentor and below the brick Gothic St. Peter's church in the medieval city centre of Lübeck.

  • St. Anne's Museum, Lübeck
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    St. Anne's Museum, Lübeck

    St. Anne's Museum (German: St.-Annen-Museum) is a museum and art exhibition hall located near St. Giles Church and next to the synagogue in the south-east of the city of Lübeck, Germany.

    The main building was previously an Augustinian nunnery, St. Anne's Priory (German: Sankt-Annen-Kloster), built 1502–1515 in late Brick Gothic style. Since 1915 it has housed one of Lübeck's museums of art and cultural history containing Germany's largest collection of medieval sculpture and altar-pieces, including the famous altars by Hans Memling (formerly at Lübeck Cathedral), Bernt Notke, Hermen Rode, Jacob van Utrecht and Benedikt Dreyer. These are exhibited on the building's first floor.

    On the building's second floor is exhibited a large collection of home decor items and interiors of different periods, showing how the area's citizens lived from medieval times up to the 1800s.

    A modern addition houses special exhibits.

    The museum is part of the Lübeck World Heritage site.

  • Boltenhagen
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Boltenhagen

    Boltenhagen is a German seaside resort in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern situated on the Baltic Sea coast 30 km east of Lübeck. It offers a wide view of the Bay of Lübeck; a 5 km stretch of a wide and sandy beach, a boardwalk, restaurants and health spas, (including general health spas and also health spas for handicapped (blind) people).

    Boltenhagen is especially famous with families for its shallow beaches combined with a superb water quality.

    A marina with fishing harbour connects to the resort at its eastern most end, offering hotels and private beaches overlooking the vast Wohlenberger Wiek, a shallow bay in between Boltenhagen and Wismar.

    West of the town and close to the seaside lies the picturesque little castle of Gross-Schwansee, recently refurbished and converted into a luxury hotel. South of it, Schloß Bothmer, a remarkable Tudor-style castle in the nearby village of Klütz can be visited.

  • Travemünde
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Travemünde

    Travemünde is a borough of Lübeck, Germany, located at the mouth of the river Trave in Lübeck Bay. It began life as a fortress built by Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony, in the 12th century to guard the mouth of the Trave, and the Danes subsequently strengthened it. It became a town in 1317 and in 1329 passed into the possession of the free city of Lübeck, to which it has since belonged. Its fortifications were demolished in 1807.

    Travemünde has been a seaside resort since 1802, and is Germany's largest ferry port on the Baltic Sea with connections to Sweden, Finland, Russia, Latvia and Estonia. The lighthouse is the oldest on the German Baltic coast, dating from 1539. Another attraction of Travemünde is the Flying P-Liner Passat, a museum ship anchored in the mouth of the Trave.

    The annual Travemünder Woche is a traditional sailing race week in Northern Europe. The annual Sand festival in Travemünde is known as the Sand World.

  • Buddenbrooks House Literary Museum – Thomas Mann Centre
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Buddenbrooks House Literary Museum – Thomas Mann Centre

    The Buddenbrooks House, which provides the setting for Thomas Mann's famous novel, now contains a museum that has served as a tribute to the Mann family's literary legacy since 1993. Based in Lübeck's old town, the permanent exhibition – comprising letters, commentaries and first editions – gives an insight into the life and work of the writers Thomas and Heinrich Mann. Also on display are photos and other contemporary documents, including Thomas Mann's certificate for winning the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1929. The centre regularly hosts special exhibitions focusing on the various members of the Mann family as well as other 20th century writers. Events held in original settings across the town really help bring the novels to life.

    Hours: January - March: Tuesday - Sunday: 11am - 5pm. April - December: Tuesday - Sunday 10am - 5pm.

    Admission: Adults 5 €, Concessions 2 €, Children under 6 years free.

  • Günter Grass House

    Günter Grass House

    The Günter Grass Museum presents the work of the famous author - winner of the Nobel Prize for literature - who is also a draughtsman, sculptor and illustrator of his own books. The collection contains more than 1100 drawings, etchings, lithographs, water colours and manuscripts. Particularly attractive is the small courtyard and sculpture garden (opened in 2007). The permanent exhibition traces the processes which shaped such books as the well-known Tin Drum, My Century and Crabwalk. The museum houses a small library and an art shop. There are regular lectures, symposiums and readings, and there have also been exhibitions on the works of other creative geniuses who, like Grass, worked in more than one creative field such as Goethe, Hermann Hesse or Wilhelm Busch.

    Hours: January - March: Tuesday-Sunday 11am - 5pm. April - December: daily 10am - 5pm.

    Admission: Adults 5 €, Concessions 2 €, Children under 6 years free.

  • St. Anne's Museum

    St. Anne's Museum

    The museum is located in a former Augustinian convent from the early 16th century and is host to Germany's most significant collection of ecclesiastical art and late-medieval carved altarpieces of German origin. The collection is completed by sacral works of Dutch painting from the 15th and 16th centuries, the outstanding example of which is the famed Passion Altar sculpted by Hans Memling in 1491. The department also displays an exquisite collection of liturgical garments and tools from the Middle Ages.

    On the first floor the visitor finds an exhibition of home décor. The museum shows in several differently furnished rooms how the citizens of the Hanseatic city lived during the centuries from the Middle Ages until around 1800. Antique furniture of exquisite quality, showpieces of glasses and magnificent silver, porcelain and faience are reminders of the wealth and the taste of the citizens of Lübeck. The museum also houses an exhibition of toys.

  • Marzipan Land
    [ source: Company website ]

    Marzipan Land

    Lip-smacking delights await at Lübeck's Marzipan Land. Don't worry if you haven't got a sweet tooth though – there's lots to learn about the history of marzipan, how it's made and the many different styles and flavors. Art lovers won't be alone in marveling at a marzipan reproduction of Da Vinci's Last Supper. It measures 20m² and weighs in at one and a half tons. There's also a marzipan violin that can actually be played, complete with edible sheet music! A dress consisting of 25,000 marzipan sweets has even made it into the Guinness Book of Records. There's not much here that isn't marzipan – brightly colored frogs, red and white lighthouses, succulent-looking shrimps, German sausages and a mediterranean fruit cart packed with lemons, oranges, strawberries and melons. Visitors are also welcome to create their own marzipan models. Open daily 10am - 6pm with free admission.

  • Puppet Theater Museum and Theater
    [ source: Theater website ]

    Puppet Theater Museum and Theater

    Theater puppets take center stage in this museum in Lübeck's old town. The collection, which is drawn from three centuries and covers an area of 600m², includes hand puppets, marionettes, rod puppets, shadow puppets and ventriloquist's dummies. It also showcases numerous other puppets from Europe, Asia and Africa. Posters, leaflets, entrance tickets, trading licences of established families of players, complete stages, scenery, props, tools – everything and anything to do with the enchanting world of puppet theater is on display here. The museum is also home to an extensive collection of organs, musical instruments and street ballad display panels. Next door is the Lübeck Marionette Theater with a program that rotates on a daily basis.

    Hours: November - March: Tuesday - Sunday: 11am - 5pm. April - October: Monday - Sunday: 11 am - 6pm.

  • Niederegger Marzipan Cafe and Museum
    [ source: Company website ]

    Niederegger Marzipan Cafe and Museum

    Lübeck's premier producer of marzipan (since 1806) offers visitors a small marzipan museum in addition to its well-established café. In this marzipan paradise they can learn all about the legend of how marzipan was invented and the history of the House of Niederegger. The Marzipan Museum's most impressive exhibits are twelve life-size marzipan figures, representations of famous Lübeck residents, from Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen to Thomas Mann and Wolfgang Joop. Guided tours available.
  • Museum of Nature and Environment

    Museum of Nature and Environment

    The Museum of Ethnology, part of the Museum of Art and Cultural History, has been located in the 16th century armoury next to Lübeck Cathedral since 1984. Its 30,000+ exhibits, gathered from every corner of the globe, range from religious objects and artworks to simple everyday items. The museum chronicles the past and present lives of people from outside Europe – with a focus on the Near and Middle East, East Asia, Africa, Central and South America and the South Pacific. A highlight of the collection is the Lübeck Apothecary Mummy, a relic from ancient Egypt. The opulence of its amulet jewellery, which is still present under the bandages, is unparalleled in a museum of this kind.

    Hours: Tuesday - Friday 9am - 5pm, Saturdays and Sunday 10am - 5pm.

    Admission: Adults 5 €, Concessions 2 €, Children under 6 years free.

  • Heiligen Geist (Holy Spirit) Hospital
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Heiligen Geist (Holy Spirit) Hospital

    The Heiligen-Geist-Hospital at Koberg certainly belongs among the major Old Town sights. Lübeck´s wealthy merchants designed the building to be a home for the poor and sick in 1280, and it still has an old people´s home within its walls today. Built from 1276-1286, the beautiful brick building with its 5 spires is one of Europe´s oldest hospitals. Originally a civil social institution, it was later run by the church. A church with remarkable mural paintings also belongs to the large complex, as does the so called long house which used to be the dormitory. There are several nice restaurants beneath the hospital, and in winter a very picturesque Christmas market with lots of handcrafted products takes place here.

  • Brick Gothic
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Brick Gothic

    Brick Gothic (German: Backsteingotik, Polish: Gotyk ceglany) is a specific style of Gothic architecture common in Northern Europe, especially in Northern Germany and the regions around the Baltic Sea that do not have natural rock resources. The buildings are essentially built from bricks. Brick Gothic buildings are found in the Baltic countries of Denmark, Finland, Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Belarus, Russia and Sweden.

    As the use of baked red brick in Northern Europe dates from the 12th century, the oldest such buildings are classified as the Brick Romanesque. In the 16th century, Brick Gothic was superseded by Brick Renaissance architecture.

    Brick Gothic is characterised by the lack of figural architectural sculpture, widespread in other styles of Gothic architecture; and by its creative subdivision and structuring of walls, using built ornaments and the colour contrast between red bricks, glazed bricks and white lime plaster.

    Many of the old town centres dominated by Brick Gothic, as well as some individual structures, have been listed as UNESCO World Heritage sites.

  • Behnhaus
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Behnhaus

    The Behnhaus is an art museum in the Hanseatic city of Lübeck, Germany, and part of its World heritage site.

    The Behnhaus as a structure is a neoclassical building with interior design by the Danish architect Joseph Christian Lillie. The museum exhibits furniture from this period, and paintings and sculptures from this period onwards. It specializes in Nazarene art, since Friedrich Overbeck was born in Lübeck.

    The museum is also known for its collection of works by Edvard Munch.



What is your insider travel tip for Lübeck?

Travel Insider Tips for Lübeck

Lübeck Overview

Situated at the Trave River, Lübeck is the largest German port on the Baltic Sea. Lübeck's Old Town is the first in Germany ever officially declared a UNESCO Cultural World Heritage Site. The Elbe-Lübeck Canal connects the Trave with the Elbe River. Another important river near the town center is the Wakenitz. Autobahn 1 connects Lübeck with Hamburg (Hamburg vacation rentals | Hamburg travel guide) and Denmark (Vogelfluglinie). Lübeck's Travemünde (Travemünde vacation rentals | Travemünde travel guide) borough is a sea resort and ferry port.

Things to See

Lightship Fehmarnbelt in front of the Concert and Congress Center.

Hospital of the Holy Spirit, one of the oldest social institutions of Lübeck (1260)

Much of the old town has kept a medieval look with old buildings and narrow streets. The town once could only be entered by passing one of four town gates, of which two remain today, the well-known Holstentor (1464) and the Burgtor (1444).

The old town center is dominated by seven church steeples. The oldest ones are the Lübecker Dom (the city's cathedral) and the Marienkirche (Saint Mary's), both from the 13th and 14th centuries.

Other sights include:

  • the Lübecker Rathaus (Town Hall).
  • Saint Catherine Church, Lübeck, a church that belonged to a former monastery, now the Katharineum, a Latin school.
  • Thomas Mann's house.
  • Günter Grass' house.
  • Church of St. Lawrence, located on the site of a cemetery of people who died during the 16th century plague.
  • Church of St. Jacob (Lübecker Jakobikirche), 1334.
  • the Salzspeicher, historic warehouses where salt delivered from Lüneburg (Lüneburg vacation rentals | Lüneburg travel guide) awaited shipment to Baltic ports.

Museums

Lübeck has many smaller museums like the St. Annen Museum, the Behnhaus and the Holstentor. Lübeck Museum of Theatre Puppets is a privately run museum. Waterside attractions are a lightvessel that served Fehmarnbelt and Lisa von Lübeck, a reconstruction of a Hanseatic 15th century caravel.

Miscellaneous

Lübeck is very famous for its excellent marzipan industry, and according to local legend, Marzipan was first made in Lübeck possibly in response to either a military siege of the city, or a famine year. The story, perhaps apocryphal, is that the town ran out of all foods except stored almonds and sugar, and used these to make loaves of marzipan "bread". Others believe that marzipan was actually invented in Persia a few hundred years before Lübeck claims to have invented it. The best known producer is Niederegger, which tourists often visit while in Lübeck, especially during Christmas time.

Like many other places in Germany, Lübeck has a long tradition with Christmas markets in December, which include the famous handicrafts market inside the Heiligen-Geist-Hospital (Hospital of the Holy Spirit), located at the north end of Königstrasse.

The Lübeck wine trade dates back to Hanseatic times. One Lübeck specialty is Rotspon, wine made from grapes processed and fermented in France and transported in wooden barrels to Lübeck, where it is stored, aged and bottled.

The industrial Lübeck-Herrenwyk area houses the static inverter plant of the HVDC Baltic-Cable.

Lubec, Maine, the easternmost town in the United States, is named for Lübeck.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Lübeck

The area around Lübeck was settled after the last Ice Age. Several Neolithic dolmens can be found in the area.

In addition, around 700 AD Slavic peoples started to come into the eastern parts of Holstein which had been left by many Germanic inhabitants in the course of the Migration Period. By the early 9th century Charlemagne, whose Christianisation attempts were opposed by Saxons, moved Saxons out and brought in Polabian Slavs, who were allied to Charlemagne, in their stead. Liubice ("lovely") was founded on the Trave banks about four kilometres north of the present-day city centre of Lübeck. In the 10th century it became the most important settlement of the Obotrite confederacy and a castle was built. The settlement was burned down in 1128 by pagan Rani from Rügen (Rügen vacation rentals | Rügen travel guide).

The modern town was founded by Adolf II, Count of Schauenburg and Holstein, in 1143 as a German settlement on the river island Bucu. He established a new castle which was first mentioned by Helmold in 1147. Adolf had to cede the castle to Henry the Lion in 1158. After Henry's fall in 1181, the town became an Imperial city for eight years. Emperor Barbarossa gave the city a ruling council with twenty members that survived into the 19th century. This council was dominated by merchants and caused Lübeck's politics to be dominated by trade interests for centuries to come.

The town and castle changed ownership for a period afterwards and was part of the Duchy of Saxony until 1192, of the County of Holstein until 1217 and part of Denmark until the Battle of Bornhöved in 1227.

Around 1200 the port became the main point of departure for colonists leaving for the Baltic territories conquered by the Livonian Order and, later, Teutonic Order. In 1226 Emperor Frederick II elevated the town to an Imperial Free City, becoming the Free City of Lübeck. In the 14th century Lübeck became the "Queen of the Hanseatic League", being by far the largest and most powerful member of this mediaeval trade organization. In 1375, Emperor Charles IV. named Lübeck one of the five "Glories of the Empire", a title shared with Venice, Rome, Pisa and Florence. Several conflicts about trade privileges were fought by Lübeck and the Hanseatic League against Denmark and Norway with varying outcomes. While Lübeck and the Hanseatic League prevailed in conflicts in 1435 and 1512, Lübeck lost when it became involved in the Count's Feud, a civil war that raged in Denmark from 1534 to 1536. Lübeck also joined the Schmalkaldic League.

After defeat in the Count's Feud, Lübeck's power slowly declined. Lübeck managed to remain neutral in the Thirty Years' War, but with the devastation caused by the decades-long war and the new transatlantic orientation of European trade, the Hanseatic League and thus Lübeck lost importance. After the Hanseatic League was de facto disbanded in 1669, Lübeck remained an important trading town on the Baltic Sea.

The great composer Dieterich Buxtehude (Buxtehude vacation rentals | Buxtehude travel guide) became organist at the Marienkirche in Lübeck in 1668 and remained at the post until at least 1703.

In course of the war of the Fourth Coalition against Napoleon, troops under Bernadotte occupied the neutral Lübeck after a battle against Blücher on November 6th, 1806. Under the Continental System, the bank went into bankruptcy and from 1811 to 1813 Lübeck was formally annexed as part of France until the Vienna Congress of 1815.

In 1937 the Nazis passed the so-called Greater Hamburg (Hamburg vacation rentals | Hamburg travel guide) Act, where the nearby Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg was expanded, to encompass towns that had formally belonged to the Prussian province of Schleswig-Holstein. To compensate Prussia for these losses (and partly because Hitler had a personal dislike for Lübeck), the 711-year-long independence of Lübeck came to an end and almost all its territory was incorporated into Schleswig-Holstein.

During World War II, Lübeck was the first German city to be attacked in substantial numbers by the Royal Air Force. The attack on 28 March 1942 created a firestorm, that caused severe damage to the historic centre and the Bombing of Lübeck in World War II destroyed three of the main churches and greater parts of the built-up area. A POW camp for officers, Oflag X-C, was located near the city from 1940 until April 1945. Lübeck was occupied without resistance by the Second Army on May 2, 1945. On May 3, 1945, one of the biggest disasters in naval history happened in the Bay of Lübeck when RAF bombers sank three ships which, unknown to them, were packed with concentration-camp inmates. About 7,000 people were killed.

Lübeck's population grew considerably from about 150,000 in 1939 to more than 220,000 after the war, owing to an influx of refugees expelled from the former Eastern provinces of Germany.

Lübeck remained part of Schleswig-Holstein after the war (and consequently lay within West Germany) and was situated directly at the inner German border during the division of Germany into two rival states in the Cold War period. South of the city the border followed the path of the river Wakenitz that separated both countries by less than 10 m in many parts. The northernmost border crossing was in Lübeck's district of Schlutup.

Lübeck's restored historic city centre became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987.

[ source: wikipedia ]

With a long and proud history, Luebeck's past as a dominant city in the Hanseatic League continues to be felt today. In 1987, UNESCO named Luebeck's city scape as World Heritage Site. Over 1,800 buildings, alleys, and streets lie within this district, which is completely enclosed by rivers and canals, creating an island of sorts. For many Germans, Luebeck is beloved because of its delectable marzipan tradition. Be sure to linger in front of a confectioner's shop here and prepare to be amazed at the array of marzipan creations - from elephants to lady bugs - that are available to see, and taste! Luebeck's cultural offerings are as rich as its culinary ones. The famed Memling Altar can be seen at the St. Annen Museum. Also, the just as famous brick Holsten Gate, once an access point along the city wall, attracts tourists from far and near. Children love the Luebeck Puppet Theater and the Museum for Theater Figures with its puppet and marionette exhibits. Luebeck also has a rich literary tradition. The prominent German writers Thomas and Heinrich Mann grew up here, and exhibits on their lives and careers can be found in the Buddenbrook House. Guenther Grass, the winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature, also chose to live in Luebeck, and an exhibit on his work is located on the Glockengiesserstrasse. If you are interested in European films, schedule your visit to Luebeck to coincide with the Nordic Film Days, a festival in November which features films from the Scandanavian and Baltic countries. Although there is plenty to keep you busy in Luebeck, day trips to the beaches of Travemuende or the historic city of Lueneburg are also sure to please.

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