[ source: Wikipedia ]

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Popular Points of Interest in and near Lüneburg

  • Lüneburg Heath Nature Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Lüneburg Heath Nature Park

    In the north of the area known as the Lüneburg Heath in northern Germany, lies the Lüneburg Heath Nature Park (German: Naturpark Lüneburger Heide) with an area of 1,130 square kilometres (440 sq mi). In the centre of the nature park is the Lüneburg Heath Nature Reserve with an area of 23,440 hectares (57,900 acres).

    The nature park belongs to the former province (Regierungsbezirk) of Lüneburg and, after its expansion in 2007, includes parts of the districts of Harburg, Lüneburg and Soltau-Fallingbostel. The Lüneburg Heath Nature Park is bordered in the north by Buchholz, in the east by Lüneburg, in the south by Soltau and in the west by Neuenkirchen. It lies roughly 40 kilometres (25 mi) south of Hamburg, 70 km east of Bremen and 90 km north of Hanover. It was established as early as 1922, initially with 21,000 hectares (52,000 acres) of nature reserve. In 1993 this area was increased to 23,440 hectares (57,900 acres). By the beginning of 2007 the area of the nature reserve almost coincided with the area of the nature park. On 14 February 2007 the park was expanded to 113,000 hectares (280,000 acres). The areas added included various protected areas (Landschaftsschutzgebiete).

  • Südheide Nature Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Südheide Nature Park

    The Südheide Nature Park ("Southern Heath Nature Park", German: Naturpark Südheide) is a large protected area of forest and heathland in the southern part of the Lüneburg Heath in North Germany. It has been designated as a protected nature park since 1964.

    The Südheide Nature Park is roughly 480 square kilometres (190 sq mi) in area and lies in the southern part of the Lüneburg Heath, in the northeastern part of Celle district, beginning a few kilometres north of Celle itself. From there it stretches northwards, between the towns of Bergen to the west, Faßberg to the north and Weyhausen and Steinhorst to the east. The other towns in the nature park are Eschede, Hermannsburg, Müden (Örtze), Unterlüß, Eldingen and, on the edge of the park, Winsen an der Aller.

    The borders of the nature park are not identical with the term Südheide used in local parlance. That refers to the region south of a line from Munster to Uelzen to Gifhorn. Northwest of the Südheide Nature Park is the Lüneburg Heath Nature Park and, north of that, the Nordheide ("North Heath") with its nature park on the Harburg Hills. The whole region is referred to as the Lüneburg Heath (Lüneburger Heide).

  • German Salt Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    German Salt Museum

    The German Salt Museum (German: Deutsche Salzmuseum / Industriedenkmal Saline Lüneburg) in the German town of Lüneburg was established on the site of the old production facilities of the Lüneburg Saltworks (Lüneburger Saline) when it was closed in 1980.

    This industrial memorial which is based in the boiling house built in 1924 is one of the earliest of its type. It recalls the history of the oldest and, at one time, the greatest industrial operation in central Europe.

    During the summer demonstrations take place in a replica of part of a medieval boiling hut are available on request. Members of the salt museum staff, dressed in historical costume, demonstrate the salt-boiling process using lead salt pans heated on wood fires.



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Travel Insider Tips for Lüneburg

Lüneburg Overview

Lüneburg, also known as Lueneburg and Lunenburg in English, is a city in the German state of Lower Saxony. The city is located about 45 km (30 miles) — a thirty-minute train ride — southeast of fellow Hanseatic city Hamburg (Hamburg vacation rentals | Hamburg travel guide). It is part of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region, and one of Hamburg's inner suburbs. The capital of the district of Lüneburg, it has a population of around 72 000. The urban area, which includes the surrounding communities like Adendorf (Adendorf vacation rentals | Adendorf travel guide), Bardowick, and Reppenstedt, has a population of around 103 000. Lüneburg has been allowed to use the title "Hansestadt" (Hanseatic city) in its name since 2007, in recognition of its membership in the former Hanseatic League. The official name of the city is thus Hansestadt Lüneburg (Hanseatic City of Lüneburg); the city is also a Universitätsstadt (university city). As of December 2007, the city was the 120th largest in the Federal Republic of Germany.

The Ilmenau River, a tributary of the Elbe, flows through Lüneburg and features in the city's song; it was formerly traversed by cogs taking salt from the city to the other, larger ports of the Hanseatic League nearby. To the south of the city stretches the 7.400 km² Lüneburger Heide. According to tradition, this heath developed as a result of centuries of logging undertaken to meet the constant need of the Lüneburg salt works for wood. This constant mining of the salt deposits over which the city exists has also resulted in the sometimes gradual, sometimes dramatically pronounced sinking of various areas of the city. On the western edge of the city is the Kalkberg, a small hill and former gypsum quarry.

Things to See in Lüneburg

German salt museum in the buildings of the former Saline, where the importance of salt in the Middle Ages and the salt production vividly illustrated

Museum of the Principality of Lüneburg, in which the city's history and the history of the environment are presented

Theater Lüneburg

Outstanding buildings are the three remaining city churches St. Locust on sand (completed 1370), the Church of St. Michaelis, where Johann Sebastian Bach was a choir boy from 1700 to 1702, and the almost modern-looking church of St. Nikolai , which was built from 1407.

Before the gates of the old city is also the monastery Lünen

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Lüneburg

The ancient town is probably to be identified with Leufana or Leuphana (Greek: Λευφάνα), a town listed in Ptolemy (2.10) in the north of Germany on the west of the Elbe, but this identification is not universally accepted. The first evidence of human habitation in the area is from the Upper Paleolithic: 56 axes, estimated at 15 000 years old, were uncovered in the area during the construction in the 1990s of the Autobahn between Ochtmissen and Bardowick. The area was almost certainly not continuously inhabited, however, due to the Ice Ages. The first indication of real settlement in the area is an axe found between Lüne and Bardowick that dates to the 6th century BCE; other items have been discovered dating to as early as 1900 BCE.

In spite of the discovery of this all-important spice and food preservative, Lüneburg was not the most important city in the area. Bardowick, a major Slavic trading site, was older, wealthier, and — with seven churches — more significant in terms of religious; this made it the political centre of the area. Bardowick, however, fought against Henry the Lion, and when it lost, Henry raised it to the ground in 1189 whilst simultaneously granting Lüneburg city status and a monopoly on the extraction of salt for northern Germany. This monopoly made Lüneburg wealthy and important, and the city acceded at a very early date to the Hanseatic League. Lüneburg's salt was used to preserve the herings caught in the Baltic and in the waters around Norway; this quickly made the city — along with the herring-processing centres of Visby, Lübeck (Lübeck vacation rentals | Lübeck travel guide), and Bergen (Bergen vacation rentals | Bergen travel guide) — one of the wealthiest and most important in the league. The salt from the city was at first conveyed overland, along the Old Salt Route via Lauenburg to Lübeck; with the opening of the Stecknitz Canal in 1398 the salt could be transported by cog.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Lüneburg, also known as Lueneburg and Lunenburg in English, is a city in the German state of Lower Saxony. The city is located about 45 km (30 miles) — a thirty-minute train ride — southeast of fellow Hanseatic city Hamburg. It is part of the Hamburg Metropolitan Region, and one of Hamburg's inner suburbs. The capital of the district of Lüneburg, it has a population of around 72 000. The urban area, which includes the surrounding communities like Adendorf, Bardowick, and Reppenstedt, has a population of around 103 000. Lüneburg has been allowed to use the title "Hansestadt" (Hanseatic city) in its name since 2007, in recognition of its membership in the former Hanseatic League. The official name of the city is thus Hansestadt Lüneburg (Hanseatic City of Lüneburg); the city is also a Universitätsstadt (university city). As of December 2007, the city was the 120th largest in the Federal Republic of Germany.

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