[ source: Flickr ]

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Previously asked Marburg questions and answers:

Here is a list of Marburg questions that were already answered by our local residents and property owners. Please browse through them. In case you still have a question that is not answered here please use the form above.

Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

"Hello! I'm an university student who is going to take part in the summer forum of EYP in Marburg! I'm arriving from Frankfurt airport by train and then from Marburg station I need to reach the Youth Hostel near river Lahn. Is there any bus/tram I can use? Maybe line 3? Where can I find it and buy the ticket? What about the taxi? How much does it cost for about 2.2 km? Thank you!" (posted 07/03/2014)

Hello Have a look at: http://www.tourismus.marburg.de/gastgeber. Taxi would be around € 5. Bus: go to the nearby bus station to> Rudolfsplatz <from this you have to walk about 10 min to Jahn street. Hostel Marburg Jahnstr. 1 35037 Marburg Tel +49 (0) 6421/23461 Fax +49 (0) 6421/12191 Distance to downtown Marburg 0.6 km; distance to nearest railway station 1.4 km; distance to the Autobahn 1.0 km. Kind regards, Melanie Herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 07/03/2014
This answer is helpful
Bus line 3 and get off at "Auf der Weide" or line 6 and get off at "Adolf Reichwein School" The taxi should cost about 9 EUR.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 07/03/2014
This answer is helpful
"Will be visiting Marburg early in May. Would like to spend a day driving through Frankenberg, Waldeck,Ippinghausen, Kassel as this is the area of my family heritage. Are there any tours, can I rent a car for the day or can I do this by local train?" (posted 04/08/2015)

Hello, this woul be a nice 'cellar forest' tour. A car http://www.Kellerwald.de You may book, it is Easier, more Flexibility Kind regards Melanie Herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 04/15/2015
This answer is helpful
Yes, it is possible to rent a car in Marburg. By train, it would be a bit complicated.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 04/11/2015
This answer is helpful
"I will visiting Cologne, Miltenberg, Wurzburg, Bamberg, Regensburg, Passau. Are any of these cities near Marburg?" (posted 07/04/2015)

No, all of them are far away from Marburg. Cologne is 180 km with the nearest city.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 07/05/2015
This answer is helpful
Hello The Closest Miltenberg is 1:30 min. Kind Regards M.Herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 07/05/2015
This answer is helpful
"Hey,I just moved to Gladenbach-1 hour from germany- I would like to know if I can actually take the bus from Adolf-Reichwein schule (the bus '6' ) to go to Rudolfsplatz.Can I actually do thet or I will be like 'where am I?" haha" (posted 11/05/2015)

Hello Gladenbach is about 25 minutes from Marburg. The rest of your question I do not understand. Gladenbach is about 25 minutes away from Marburg. The rest of your question I did not understand - sorry. Both is in Germany!
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 11/06/2015
This answer is helpful
yes, bus no. 6 goes to Rudolfplatz.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 11/06/2015
This answer is helpful

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

"Hi! I am going to move to Marburg in two months and I have a couple of questions: what are the best cultural attractions in Marburg? Does it have an art house cinema? What are the best bars and night clubs? The best restaurants? What's the best place to do my groceries? That includes accesible prices and quality. This and any other tips are welcomed. Thank you." (posted 06/06/2014)

Please have a look at the Marburg site www.marburg.de The informations are so in English so in English. Kind regards M.herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 06/09/2014
This answer is helpful
Hello, best for sightseeing is the Elisabeth Church, the Castle and the old city in general. There is an arthouse-cinema. There are two clubs ("Night Salonn" and "Till Dawn"). Best restaurants are hotel "Rose Park" and "Small Restaurant". And someother not in the cenre of Marburg. There are many supermarkets and other shops here.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 06/07/2014
This answer is helpful
"I am planning to visit Marburg for a couple of days. All the thing adults must see, I have checked already, however I am wondering if you can tell me what kind of entertainment I can find for a 5-year-old child. What do moms usually do in the afternoon with their tods? Looking forward to your answer. Thank you Mihaela Raduta" (posted 07/31/2014)

Dear Mihaela Raduta, there is nothing special for age. But there are parks / playgrounds in Marburg. And some museums could be interesting. Regards, Andreas Kunz
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 08/02/2014
This answer is helpful 2
Please have a look at the Marburg website: www.marburg.de. You will find some tips on nice things to do with children: the Aquamar swimming pool, in Rauischholzhausen - close to Marburg a "petting zoo" stork's nest, at the Frauenberg castle ruins, there are a lot of goats sharing the path with you ..... Kind Regards, Melanie Herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 08/07/2014
This answer is helpful
"Why should someone do a vacation in Marburg? Can you possibly tell me 2-3 popular travel tips for Marburg, which everyone visiting Marburg should see? Also let me know 2-3 special insider travel tips for Marburg that a typical tourist may not know about, but that you can highly recommend. Thanks!" (posted 09/02/2014)

First Elisabeth Church (the first Gothic church in Germany, known by the Holy Elisaeth) 2 Landgrafenschloss 3 Old Town (original condition) 4 Kaiser-Wilhelm-Turm (lookout tower in the forest with the historical way there) 5 (insider): " Real "old town Weidenhausen sixth boat or Kaja Tour on the Lahn 7 Very good cycling opportunities on the Lahn along 9th Historical motifs of the Brothers Grimm outside the city 10 Interesting villages and landscapes outside of Marburg 11 Christenberg with Munchausen (settlement of the Celts) 12 Amoeneburg about 15 km from Marburg (small town on a former volcano) 13 Some very good restaurants (Michelin)
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 09/02/2014
This answer is helpful 2
Marburg is a dynamic and historic university city. There are so many ways to experience Marburg. Very good city tours with different themes. Of course, the castle, the Church of St. Elizabeth, the old town with its quaint market square. Many events during the year. The surrounding area with its destinations is very nice: The Amoeneburg, the village Rauischholzhausen, the picnic area plus hotel Dammühle, woman mountain with ruins, many hiking trails, the intoxicating beautiful forests all around ..... www.marburg.de I love Marburg
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 09/02/2014
This answer is helpful
"I will have a 37 day holiday in Marburg this November, what are interesting places to go or interesting things to do near Marburg? Thank you!" (posted 09/06/2014)

Hello, Elisabeth Church Landgrafenschloss Old Town Kaiser-Wilhelm-Turm some good restaurants
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 09/08/2014
This answer is helpful
"We are looking at visiting Marburg May 2016, would one day be enought time there. We like villages and old towns" (posted 08/19/2015)

One day is short, but can be enough for the old part of the city. But not for the villages around.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 08/19/2015
This answer is helpful
Hi, this is a very individual question. I would one day is not rich ;-) Marburg itself and the environment is very vielfältig.Ich would allow more time. MfG M.Herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 08/19/2015
This answer is helpful
"I will be based in Marburg and would like to check out some wineries. Is this possible by bicycle? Are there any wine tours from Marburg?" (posted 08/26/2015)

Hello Marburg is not a wine region. Although it has good wine shops and restaurants, but not cultivation. For Southern Germany is famous. Sincerely M.Herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 08/27/2015
This answer is helpful
Sorry but Marburg and the region around is not for wine ... Only in the south of Germany.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 08/27/2015
This answer is helpful
"Dear Sirs, we are at the turn of his few days in Burg Stauffenberg. Do you have tips for us what we can do in the area. With pre-Christmas wishes from the North! Ingeborg Block" (posted 12/04/2015)

Hello, it is not far from Marburg where are many things to see. So casting is not far, but it is not so nice there.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 12/05/2015
This answer is helpful
"Hello, My boss and I will be in Marburg for business, but have some free time this Sunday. We are interested in doing a walking/history tour of Marburg. Can you please recommend any tour companies or anyone who could give a tour in English. Thanks! Maggie" (posted 03/17/2016)

Hello Have a look at www.marburg.de> tourism> English botton Kind regards
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 03/17/2016
This answer is helpful
https://www.marburg.de/kultur-tourismus/tourismus/service-kontakt/
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 03/17/2016
This answer is helpful

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

"hello, do you now playgrounds for kids in marburg, hessen? I want to now if here are playgrounds in any buildings with toys. thank you" (posted 10/11/2015)

Hi Please look at the Marburg site http://www.marburg.de/en/24679 There are playgrounds scattered in Marburg. MfG M.Herrmann
Answer provided by Melanie Herrmann on 10/12/2015
This answer is helpful
There are playgrounds in Marburg, but not located very close to the accommodation. There are no toys in the flats.
Answer provided by Andreas Kunz on 10/12/2015
This answer is helpful

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Marburg

  • Church of Saint Elizabeth
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Church of Saint Elizabeth

    The Elisabeth Church in Marburg was built in 1235-1281 by the Order of the Teutonic Knights in honor of Elisabeth of Hungary. Her tomb made the church an important pilgrimage destination in the late Middle Ages. The building is now a Protestant church. The church is one of the earliest purely Gothic churches in German-speaking areas, and is held to be a model for the architecture of Cologne Cathedral.

    Hours: April - September: 9am - 6pm, October: 9am - 5pm, November - March: 10am - 4pm, Sundays after 11:15 am (except during services).

    Admission: Adults 2 € Concessions 1.50 € (after 1st child, free); Children under 6 years free. Tours are available at an additional cost from April 1 - October 31.

  • Langrave Castle
    [ source: Wikimedia ]

    Langrave Castle

    In 1228. Elizabeth - Hungarian princess, widow of the landgrave Ludwig of Thuringia, banished from the Wartburg - scorned the fortress Marburg and built her hospital at the foot of the fortress’ mount. Yet her daughter Sophie made Marburg the new main residency of the successive dynasty. Here, if not in Kassel, the Hessian landgraves resided until 1604. They enlarged the fortress to a fortified castle. The long, two-aisle Prince’s Hall in the north wing was completed at the beginning of the 14th century. It is considered the greatest gothic secular hall in Germany (33 x 14 m).

    After a profitable marriage made it possible to build the White Tower (referred to today as the witches’ tower) as an artillery bastion and the Wilhelm’s Tract (the east wing), the castle looked in 1500 almost the same as it does today. In later phases it became more likely to remove sections, for example, several fortifications that became obsolete after technical developments in weaponry. The last of these were demolished by Napoleon’s troops in 1807. Excavations and restoration over the past years have made some of the casemates accessible again (tours of casemates available on Saturdays at 3:15pm). The Schloss also contains the University Museum of Cultural History.

    Hours: Open daily except Monday, April - October 10am - 6pm. November - March 10am - 4pm.

  • Philipps University of Marburg
    [ source: Wikimedia ]

    Philipps University of Marburg

    The Philipps University of Marburg was founded 1527 by Landgrave Philip the Magnanimous. The monastery left vacant by the Reformation was turned over to the School of Higher Learning. Eleven professors and 84 students commenced academics on July 1st, 1527. Today there are over 18,000 students.

    In the Old University (1872-91), built upon the foundations of the Dominican monastery from the late 13th century, the Alte Aula (old lecture jall) reveals a unique perspective into the history of Marburg there in the midst of today’s student bustle.

    Appointments to visit can be made at the tourist information office.

  • Old Botanical Garden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Old Botanical Garden

    The Alter Botanischer Garten Marburg (3.6 hectares is a historic arboretum and botanical garden maintained by the University of Marburg. It is open daily without charge. In 1977 the university's gardens were transferred to the Neuer Botanischer Garten Marburg, and in 1994 the Old Botanical Garden became a registered cultural monument. Although still owned by the university, it is now used mainly as a public park containing a fine arboretum of mature trees that are over 200 years old.
  • Castle Ruins at Frauenberg
    [ source: Wikimedia ]

    Castle Ruins at Frauenberg

    Along the left bank of the Lahn River, sandstone hills rise and extend to the edge of the community of Ebsdorfergrund, culminating in a natural peak upon which stand the ruins of the Castle Frauenberg. In 1248 Sophie von Brabant, daughter of St. Elizabeth of Hungary and widow of Duke Heinrich von Brabant, came to Marburg to claim her late husband’s Thuringian inheritance. Sophie had the castle built in 1252 on the basalt peak that became commonly known as the Frauenberg, or, the woman’s peak. By the year 1489 the castle lay in ruins and the site was used as a quarry.

    Today the site remains are a popular destination, enjoyed for the grand panorama. On clear days one has an incomparable view in all directions and can spot nearly forty villages and cities before the horizon. The vista can reach as far as the mountains Hohe Meissner or Feldberg in Taunus. Frauenberg is one of a total of seven Huguenot villages in Hesse that were founded between 1686 and 1706.

  • Alter Botanischer Garten Marburg
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Alter Botanischer Garten Marburg

    The Alter Botanischer Garten Marburg (3.6 hectares), also known as the Alte Botanische Garten am Pilgrimstein, is a historic arboretum and botanical garden maintained by the University of Marburg and located at Pilgrimstein 3, Marburg, Hesse, Germany. It is open daily without charge.

    Marburg's first botanical garden was established between 1527-1533 when the humanist, poet, physician and botanist Euricius Cordus, considered a founder of scientific botany in Germany, is known to have set up a private botanical garden of which designs little is known today. In 1786 a second garden attempt was created by Professor Conrad Moench near the Elisabeth Church (Marburg).

    Today's garden dates to 1810 when Georg Wilhelm Franz Wenderoth (1774-1861) obtained the site from Jérôme Bonaparte in exchange for the earlier Ketzerbach garden, which he then developed into the English style to create a combination of park landscape and scientific garden. In 1861 Albert Wigand transformed the garden to conform with the school of Peter Joseph Lenné and Johann Heinrich Gustav Meyer, creating sections especially for trees. Later on, 1873-1875 the Botanical Institute was built at Pilgrimstein 4 in Gothic Revival style.

    In 1977 the university's gardens were transferred to the Neuer Botanischer Garten Marburg, and in 1994 the Old Botanical Garden became a registered cultural monument. Although still owned by the university, it is now used mainly as a public park containing a fine arboretum of mature trees that are over 200 years old, including specimens Quercus petraea, Platanus x acerifolia, Salix alba, Liriodendron tulipifera, and many conifers.

  • Botanischer Garten Marburg
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Botanischer Garten Marburg

    The Botanischer Garten Marburg (20 hectares), also known as the Neuer Botanischer Garten Marburg, is a botanical garden maintained by the University of Marburg, located on Karl-von-Frisch-Straße, Marburg, Hesse, Germany, and open daily. An admission fee is charged.

    The garden was created between 1961-1977 to replace the Alter Botanischer Garten Marburg, dating from 1810. Its construction involved movement of some 80,000 m³ of earth, creating a pond and a brook about 1 km long, as well as a major effort to build greenhouses. The garden was inaugurated in June 1977 to celebrate the university's 450th anniversary.

  • Marburger Schloss
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Marburger Schloss

    Marburger Schloss (Marburg castle), a.k.a. Landgrafenschloss Marburg, is a castle in Marburg, Hesse, Germany, located ontop of Schlossberg (287 m NAP). Built in the 11th century as a fort, it became the first residence of Landgraviate of Hesse (HRE). Marburg Colloquy had been held here in 1529.

    The building is today used partly as a museum (Marburger Universitätsmuseum für Kulturgeschichte, Wilhelmsbau, since 1981) and as an event site.

  • St. Elizabeth Church (Marburg)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    St. Elizabeth Church (Marburg)

    St. Elizabeth Church in Marburg, Germany, was built by the Order of the Teutonic Knights in honour of St. Elizabeth of Hungary. Her tomb made the church an important pilgrimage destination during the late Middle Ages.

    The church is one of the earliest purely Gothic churches in German-speaking areas, and is held to be a model for the architecture of Cologne Cathedral. It is built from sandstone in a cruciform layout. The nave and its flanking aisles have a vaulted ceiling more than 20 m (66 ft) high. The triple quire consists of the Elisabeth quire, the High quire and the Landgrave quire. The crossing is separated from the nave by a stone rood screen. In earlier times, the front part of the church had been reserved for the knights of the Order. The church has two towers with an approximate height of 80 m (263 ft). The northern one is crowned by a star, the southern one by a knight. It served as an inspiration for St. Paul's Church in Strasbourg.

    The Gothic shrine of St. Elizabeth is the most important treasure of the church, but other pieces of religious art are also exhibited.



What is your insider travel tip for Marburg?

Travel Insider Tips for Marburg

Marburg Overview

Marburg is a city in Hesse, Germany, on the River Lahn. It is the main town of the Marburg-Biedenkopf district.

Marburg is famous for its medieval churches, especially the Elisabethkirche, one of the two or three first purely Gothic churches north of the Alps outside of France and thus an incunable of Gothic architecture in Germany, as well as for the castle.

More important, however, is Marburg's city as such, an unspoilt, spire-dominated, castle-crowned Gothic/Renaissance city on a hill, intact because Marburg was an extreme backwater between 1600 and 1850. Unlike, for example, Rothenburg ob der Tauber (Rothenburg ob der Tauber vacation rentals | Rothenburg ob der Tauber travel guide), Marburg regained some of its importance in later centuries, so it is not a "museum village" but rather a student-dominated university town.

Much of the physical attractiveness of Marburg today is the legacy of the legendary Lord Mayor Dr. Hanno Drechsler (in office 1970-1992), who promoted urban renewal and the restoration, for the first time, by object and not by area, i.e. areas were not pulled down but rather buildings restored. Thus, at a time when other cities were still pulling down medieval quarters, Marburg already protected its unique heritage. Marburg also had one of the first pedestrian zones in Germany. Marburg's Altstadtsanierung (since 1972) received many awards and prizes.

Many homes have solar panels and in the near future it will even become compulsory to install solar systems in new buildings or as part of renovation projects. 20 percent of heating system requirements will have to be covered by solar energy in new buildings. Anyone who fails to install solar panels could be fined 1,000 Euro. The new law, approved on 20 June 2008, will take effect in October 2008. There are also three wind turbines and several buses run on natural gas or bio diesel.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Things to See in Marburg

Elisabethkirche-is the earliest purely Gothic church in Germany and probably the most famous building in Marburg

Landgrafenschloss-due to the relatively steep valley it was a very good fortified starting position for the establishment of a medieval castle.

Spiegelslustturm-The tower, also known as mirror like tower is known, is a lookout tower on the Lahnbergen.

Historical Rathaus

Alter Botanischer Garten-A few hundred yards south of the Elisabeth Church Pilgrimstein is located on the 3.6-acre Old Botanical Garden of the University of Marburg.

More about the History of Marburg

Founding and Early History

Like many settlements, Marburg developed at the crossroads of two important early medieval highways: the trade route linking Cologne (Cologne vacation rentals | Cologne travel guide) and Prague and the trade route from the North Sea to the Alps and on to Italy), the former crossing the river Lahn here. The settlement was protected and customs were raised by a small castle built during the 9th or 10th century by the Giso. Marburg has been a town since 1140, as proved by coins. From the Gisos, it fell around that time to the Landgraves of Thuringia, residing on the Wartburg above Eisenach (Eisenach vacation rentals | Eisenach travel guide).

St Elizabeth

In 1228 the widowed princess-langravine of Thuringia, Elizabeth, chose Marburg as her dowager seat, as she did not get along well with her brother-in-law, the new Landgrave. The countess dedicated her life to the sick and would become after her early death in 1231, aged 24, one of the most eminent female saints, St Elisabeth of Hungary. She was canonized in 1235.

Capital of Hesse

In 1264, St Elizabeth's daughter Sophie of Brabant, succeeded in winning the Landgraviate of Hessen, hitherto connected to Thuringia, for her son Henry. Marburg (alongside Kassel) was one of the capitals of Hessen from that time until about 1540. Following the first division of the landgraviate, it was the capital of Marburg from 1485 to 1500 and again between 1567 and 1605. Hessen was one of the more powerful second-tier principalities in Germany. Its "old enemy" was the Archbishop of Mainz (Mainz vacation rentals | Mainz travel guide), one of the Prince-electors, who competed with Hessen in many wars and conflicts for coveted territory, stretching over several centuries.

After 1605, Marburg became just another provincial town, known mostly for its university. It became a virtual backwater for two centuries after the Thirty Years' War, 1618-1648, when it was fought over by Hessen-Darmstadt and Hessen-Kassel (or Hessen-Cassel). The Hessian territory around Marburg lost more than two thirds of its population, which was more than in any later wars (including World War I and World War II) combined.

Reformation

Marburg is the seat of the oldest Protestant university in the world, the University of Marburg, (Philipps-Universität-Marburg), founded in 1527. It is one of the six classical "university villages" in Germany, the other five being Freiburg, Göttingen (Göttingen vacation rentals | Göttingen travel guide), Heidelberg (Heidelberg vacation rentals | Heidelberg travel guide), and Tübingen (Tübingen vacation rentals | Tübingen travel guide), as well as the city of Gießen, which is located 30 km south of Marburg.

In 1529, Philipp I of Hesse arranged the Marburg Colloquy, to propitiate Martin Luther and Huldrych Zwingli.

Romanticism

Owing to its neglect during the entire 18th century Marburg – like Rye or Chartres – survived as a relatively intact Gothic town, simply because there was no money spent on any new architecture or expansion. When Romanticism became the dominant cultural and artistic paradigm in Germany, Marburg became interesting once again, and many of the leaders of the movement lived, taught, or studied in Marburg. They formed a circle of friends that was of great importance, especially in literature, philology, folklore, and law. The group included Friedrich Karl von Savigny, the most important jurist of his day and father of the Roman Law adaptation in Germany; the poets, writers, and social activists Achim von Arnim, Clemens Brentano, and especially the latter's sister and former's later wife, Bettina von Arnim. Most famous internationally, however, were the Brothers Grimm, who collected many of their fairy tales here – Rapunzel's Tower stands in Marburg, and across the Lahn hills, in the area called Schwalm, little girls' costumes included a red hood.

It has to be said, however, that this circle had disappeared from Marburg by the 1820s, and for another 45 years, Marburg became a Hessian backwater again.

Prussian town

In the Austro-Prussian War of 1866, the reactionary Prince-elector of Hesse had backed Austria; Prussia won, and invaded (without any bloodshed) and annexed Hesse-Kassel (as well as Hanover, the City of Frankfurt (Frankfurt vacation rentals | Frankfurt travel guide), and other territories) north of the Main river, while likewise pro-Austrian Hesse-Darmstadt remained independent. For Marburg, this turn of events was very positive, because Prussia decided to make Marburg its main administrative center in this part of the new province Hesse-Nassau and to turn the University of Marburg into the regional academic center. Thus, Marburg's rise as an administrative and university city began; as the Prussian university system was one of the best in the world at the time, Marburg attracted many respected scholars. However, there was hardly any industry to speak of, so students, professors, and civil servants – who generally had enough but not much money and paid very little in taxes – dominated the town, which tended to be very conservative.

20th century

Franz von Papen, vice-chancellor of Germany in 1934, delivered an anti-Nazi speech at the University of Marburg on 17 June. This contributed to several of von Papen's staff being murdered by the Nazis.

In 1945, Marburg became President and Field Marshal Paul von Hindenburg's final resting place. His grave is in the Elisabethkirche. He is an honorary citizen of the town.

Marburg is also now home to one of the most progressive schools for the blind in the world. Street crossings are equipped with "walk" and "don't walk" signs that also emit sounds enabling the blind to know what the signs are "saying."

[ source: wikipedia ]

Marburg is located in Hesse, on the River Lahn. The city is famous for its medieval churches, especially the Elisabethkirche, one of the two or three first purely Gothic churches north of the Alps outside of France. Visitors will be delighted to discover that Marburg is a fairly intact Gothic/Renaissance city on a hill. This is the case because Marburg was an extreme backwater town between 1600 and 1850, and thus little changed here during that period. Unlike other similar towns, for example, Rothenburg ob der Tauber, Marburg regained some of its importance in later centuries, so it is not a "museum village" but rather a student-dominated university town.

Where to stay in Marburg?

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