[ source: Wikipedia ]

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Previously asked Potsdam questions and answers:

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Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

"Where in Potsdam can I buy fresh rolls in the morning or get a nice breakfast with coffee?" (posted 09/02/2014)

DC centrally on the Nauen Gate is the organic bakery. There you will get to and including Sunday, fresh bread rolls and you can have breakfast there too. DC diagonally opposite is the traditional Cafe Haider. Good for breakfast, cake, schnitzel etc .. In the pedestrian zone Brandenburger Straße is the bakery Fahland who bakes purely biological (also open Sunday), with the ingredients from the region. Be your guest once inside Potsdam, he will see how many cafes are there with us (actually at each corner), I can now enumerate all impossible. I hope I could be you a tiny bit helpful. Greetings C.Gimm
Answer provided by Catharina Gimm on 09/02/2014
This answer is helpful
There are many good bakers in Potsdam. Breakfast can also ma at MC Donalds or in many restaurants.
Answer provided by Kerstin Panzner on 09/03/2014
This answer is helpful

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

"Why should someone do a vacation in Potsdam? Can you possibly tell me 2-3 popular travel tips for Potsdam, which everyone visiting Potsdam should see? Also let me know 2-3 special insider travel tips for Potsdam that a typical tourist may not know about, but that you can highly recommend. Thanks!" (posted 07/06/2014)

Good day, Potsdam is a beautifully restored and historic city. The King of Prussia had built his castle here. For this reason, a visit to Sanssouci is a must. Even the New Garden with Cecilienhof is historically very significant. This is where the basic regulations for the post-war were established order by the four victorious powers after the 2nd World War. Unfortunately, the command to atomic bombing by President Eisenhauer was also signed here. Potsdam has a lot to offer in terms of art and culture. There are concerts, exhibitions, etc. Also a movie park like Universal Studios.
Answer provided by Bettina Englisch on 07/07/2014
This answer is helpful
Hi, In Potsdam you should definitely visit Sanssouci Palace and its large park, the historic mill, the Orangerie, the newly restored City Palace, the Babelsberg Park, the biosphere, the Babelsberg Film Park, Peacock Island, and the Extavitum. Some of these will appeal greatly to children. Finally, the proximity to Berlin is great. Greetings, Lütge
Answer provided by Katrin Lütge on 07/06/2014
This answer is helpful
"I'm looking to stay in Potsdam for a month next year and am wondering what the best parts of the city are to rent a place?" (posted 07/08/2014)

Potsdam is a World Heritage City, and with its Baroque old town center, it is the best location / residence, in our opinion. Babelsberg is its own entity, and it is located away from the old town core. If you like being close to things, our apartment is very well located. You do not need a car and can do everything on foot. A wonderful garden invites you to relax right in the middle of the old town, and it is a 5-minute walk from the Sans Souci Park. You can explore the old city and courtyards around Brandenburg Street with its many shops and modern passages. From here you are within 3 minutes of the Dutch Quarter with its galleries, stylish boutiques, restaurants, and trendy bars. In terms of cuisine, Potsdam has a lot to offer: Specialities of the season and the region are offered at a weekly market on the Basinenplatz and the market on the Weber Platz. Guests at our green apartment receive a number of special restaurants recommendations and tips for exploring the region. We find the old center to be the most atmospheric and charming part of Potsdam. Have a great stay in Potsdam next year! Best regards from Germany, Charlotte Droß-Richter
Answer provided by Charlotte Droß-Richter on 07/08/2014
This answer is helpful
Hello, www.Ferienwohnung-babelsberg.de
Answer provided by Katrin Lütge on 07/08/2014
This answer is helpful

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Potsdam

  • New Chambers (Sanssouci)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    New Chambers (Sanssouci)

    The New Chambers in Sanssouci Park, Potsdam, were constructed for King Frederick the Great of Prussia from 1771 to 1775.

    The building, which stands to the west of Sanssouci Palace, serves as a complement to the Picture Gallery, which lies to the east. Both buildings flank the summer palace.

    The chambers replaced an orangery, which had been built at that site in 1745 on plans by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff and held the terraces' potted plants during the winter months. Ramps, on which the tubs were taken in and out, serve as reminders of the building's original use.

    Master builder Georg Christian Unger was commissioned to turn the orangery building into a guesthouse.

    The building's basic elements were left alone, as were its size and floor-to-ceiling french doors. The most obvious change was the addition of a cupola on the middle section. The similarities between the architecture of the New Chambers and that of the Picture Gallery are such that the both buildings can be mistaken for the other.

  • New Palace (Potsdam)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    New Palace (Potsdam)

    The New Palace (German: Neues Palais) is a palace situated on the western side of the Sanssouci royal park in Potsdam, Germany. The building was begun in 1763, after the end of the Seven Years' War, under Frederick the Great and was completed in 1769. It is considered to be the last great Prussian baroque palace.

    The building of the palace commenced at the end of the Seven Years' War, to celebrate Prussia’s success. The war is also variably referred to as the Third Silesian War, owing to the dispute over Silesia. In an architectural form, Frederick the Great sought to demonstrate the power and glories of Prussia attributing it as fanfaronade, an excess of splendor in marble, stone and gilt.

    For the King, the New Palace was not a principal residence, but a display for the reception of important royals and dignitaries. Of the over 200 rooms, four principal gathering rooms and a theater were available for royal functions, balls and state occasions. During his occasional stays at the palace, Frederick occupied a suite of rooms at the southern end of the building, composed of two antechambers, a study, a concert room, a dining salon and a bedroom, among others.

  • Sanssouci Picture Gallery
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Sanssouci Picture Gallery

    The Picture Gallery in the park of Sanssouci palace in Potsdam was built in 1755–1764 during the reign of Frederick II of Prussia under the supervision of Johann Gottfried Büring. The Picture Gallery is situated east of the palace and is the oldest extant museum built for a ruler in Germany.

    The Picture Gallery was built in the place of a former greenhouse, which Frederick the Great had used to raise tropical fruit. Büring replaced this with a long, single-story building painted in yellow, the middle part of which is emphasized by a dome. On the garden side, marble sculptures stand between the windows reaching down to the floor. Most of the sculptures were made by Johann Gottlieb Heymüller and Johann Peter Benckert, and depict allegorical figures from arts and sciences. The heads on the keystones show portraits of artists.

  • Orangery Palace
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Orangery Palace

    The Orangery Palace (German: Orangerieschloss) is also known as the New Orangery on the Klausberg, or just the Orangery. It was built by the Romantic on the Throne, Friedrich Wilhelm IV, in his seat of Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany, from 1851 to 1864.

    The building of the Orangery began with a plan for a high street or triumph street. It was to begin at the triumph arch, east of Sanssouci Park, and end at the Belvedere on the Klausberg. A difference of elevation was to be balanced with viaducts.

    With reference to the north side of the Picture Gallery and the New Chambers from the time of Friedrich the Great, Friedrich Wilhelm IV sketched out more new buildings, which would decorate his two kilometer long Via Tiumphalis.

    Because of the political unrest of the period (March Revolution) and lack of funding, the gigantic project never materialized. Only the Orangery Palace and the Triumphtor were ever realized.

  • Botanical Garden, Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Botanical Garden, Potsdam

    The Botanical Garden in Potsdam (German: Botanischer Garten Potsdam or Botanischer Garten der Universität Potsdam), is a botanical garden and arboretum maintained by the University of Potsdam. It has a total area of 8.5 hectares, of which 5 hectares are open to the public, and is located immediately southwest of the Orangery Palace at Maulbeerallee 2, Potsdam, in the German state of Brandenburg. It is open daily; an admission fee is charged.

    The garden was established in 1950 on two adjacent plots of land: part of the Sanssouci Park, and the Paradise Garden (about 2.5 hectares). After World War II, the Sanssouci park was controlled by the Red Army, and briefly formed a branch of the Moscow Botanical Garden of Academy of Sciences. In 1950 today's garden was created at the northern edge of Sanssouci with the Maulbeerallee dividing the garden into two distinct areas. To the north is the Paradise Garden, now a teaching and display garden; and to the south side is the institute building, greenhouses, and outdoor space.

    Today the garden cultivates about 9,000 taxa, with excellent collections of succulents (880), Begoniaceae (89 spp.), Araceae (c.250 spp.), Aizoaceae (c.260 spp.), Haworthia (55 spp.), ferns (230), Australian Proteaceae, orchids (320), chimaeras, invasive species, and Chinese medical herbs.

    The garden cultivates about 4,000 taxa outdoors, including 50 species from Brandenburg that are threatened with extinction. Major outdoor sections include an arboretum; collections from East Asia and Eurasian steppes; the Central European deciduous forest; North American prairies; an alpine garden; rhododendrons; wild flowers; a rose garden; marsh and aquatic plants; morphological gardens illustrating a variety of leaves, shoots, roots, flowers, and fruit; useful plants including dyeing, fiber, and food crops; medicinal and aromatic plants; and protected and endangered plants from Germany.

    The garden's ten greenhouses (approximately 3,000 m² total area) contain about 4,600 tropical and subtropical species in a palm house, epiphyte house, orchid house, fern house, cactus house, aquarium house, Victoria house, etc. These houses also contain coffee and cocoa trees, sugarcane, cotton, cassava, guava, begonias, and carnivorous plants.

  • Biosphäre Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Biosphäre Potsdam

    The Biosphäre Potsdam (7,000 m²) is an indoor tropical botanical garden located in the Volkspark Potsdam, a park between the Sanssouci Park and the Neuer Garten Potsdam (New Garden) at Georg-Hermann-Allee 99, Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany. It is open daily; an admission fee is charged.

    The garden contains approximately 20,000 tropical plants representing about 350 species, including orchids, epiphytes, and trees about 14 meters in height, including a palm grove and mangrove swamp. It also includes tropical crops, a waterfall, two lakes, and various types of tropical wildlife, including iguanas, snakes, spiders, frogs, geckos, and pheasants, as well as a butterfly house containing about 30 butterfly species.

  • Cecilienhof
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cecilienhof

    Schloss Cecilienhof is a palace in the northern part of the Neuer Garten park in Potsdam, Germany, close to the Jungfernsee lake. It has been part of the Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1990.

    Cecilienhof was the last palace built by the Hohenzollern family. Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany had it erected for his son, Crown Prince Wilhelm of Germany, and the crown prince's wife Duchess Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. The house was designed by Paul Schultze-Naumburg to look like an English Tudor country house and built between 1914 and 1917. Its design was based on a house called 'Bidston Court' (later 'Hillbark') on the Wirral Peninsula. which in turn was inspired by Little Moreton Hall. The interior was furnished according to plans by Paul Troost, who originally had designed steamship décors.

    The brick and oak timberframe building, including six courtyards and 55 carved brick chimney tops, should have been completed in 1915, but construction was delayed due to the outbreak of World War I and Crown Prince Wilhelm and Cecilie could not move in until August 1917. Wilhelm followed his father into exile one year later, while Cecilie stayed at the palace until she fled from the approaching Red Army in February 1945.

    Cecilienhof was the location of the Potsdam Conference between 17 July and 2 August 1945. The rooms had been largely refurnished to match the taste of the participants. Winston Churchill, later Clement Attlee, Joseph Stalin and Harry S. Truman met at the round table in the great hall. On 26 July 1945, Churchill and Truman issued the Potsdam Declaration defining the terms for Japanese surrender, while Truman had already given order to prepare the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Today Cecilienhof is a museum as well as a hotel. Queen Elizabeth II visited Cecilienhof on 3 November 2004. On 30 May 2007, the palace was used for the G8 foreign ministers summit.

  • Babelsberg Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Babelsberg Park

    In the northeast of the city of Potsdam, bordering on the Tiefen See lake on the River Havel, lies the 114 hectare Babelsberg Park (German: Park Babelsberg). The park was created in rolling terrain sloping down towards the lake by the landscape artist, Peter Joseph Lenné and, after him, by Prince Hermann von Pückler-Muskau, by order of Prince William, later Emperor William I and his wife, Augusta.

    Park management

    Babelsberg Park is sponsored and managed by the Berlin-Brandenburg Foundation for Prussian Palaces and Gardens (Stiftung Preußische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin-Brandenburg). The population of Babelsberg has heavily criticised the management. Many residents feel that the park authority[1] is far to restrictive. This is mainly due to the strict ban on using the parkland for games. There are several initiatives that are trying to persuade the authorities to accede to the wishes of the local residents. Protests against the park authority resulted in several main paths in Babelsberg Park being officially opened to cyclists again in January 2008, including the Berlin Wall Way that runs through the park.

  • Glienicke Bridge
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Glienicke Bridge

    The Glienicke Bridge (German: Glienicker Brücke) is a bridge on the edge of Berlin that spans the Havel River to connect the cities of Potsdam and Berlin near Klein Glienicke. The current bridge, the fourth on the site, was completed in 1907, although major reconstruction was necessary after it was damaged in the Second World War.

    In popular culture

    The Glienicke bridge as a venue for prisoner exchange has appeared frequently in fiction, most notably in John Le Carré's novel Smiley's People and the related BBC miniseries, as well as in the 1966 Harry Palmer film, Funeral in Berlin, based on the novel of the same name by Len Deighton.

    The popular nickname 'Bridge of Spies' was used by the British band T'Pau as the name of the title track on their first album. The usage is metaphorical, referring to a 'walk to freedom' but in the context of long dreamt-of relationship.

    The bridge is also referenced in the popular kid's TV show Codename: Kids Next Door, specifically when a bridge in a local mall is used to exchange a spy from the KND in return for a spy from the Teenagers, a clear parody of the real-life prisoner exchanges.

    There is a brief reference to the bridge in episode six, season one of Archer, when Mallory Archer and her long-time lover (and head of the KGB) Colonel Nikolai Jakov mention meeting there "one moonlit night" when they both worked on covert operations in Berlin, presumably during the Cold War.

  • Church of the Redeemer, Sacrow
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Church of the Redeemer, Sacrow

    The Protestant Church of the Redeemer (German: Heilandskirche, Latin: S. Ecclesiae sanctissimi Salvatoris in portu sacro) is located in the south of the village of Sacrow, which since 1939 is incorporated to Potsdam, the capital of the German Bundesland of Brandenburg. It is famous for its Italian Romanesque Revival architecture with a separate campanile (bell tower) and for its localization. It has been built in 1844. The design was based on drawings by King Frederick William IV of Prussia, called the Romantic on the Throne. The building was realized by Ludwig Persius, the king's favorite architect.

    Localization

    The church is situated on the bank of lake Jungfernsee, a part of river Havel, 300 metres south of Sacrow Manor at the edge of its park, designed and expanded in the 1840s by landscape architect Peter Joseph Lenné. Both church and manor were restored in the 1990s. They are part of Potsdam Havel Landscape. This area of lakes, forests, parks, and castles has been classified as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Though the direct distance from Potsdam City across the Jungfernsee is no more than 1.2 km (2/3 mile), the distance by road is more than 10 km (6.2 mi).

  • Belvedere on the Pfingstberg
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Belvedere on the Pfingstberg

    The Belvedere on the Pfingstberg (German: Belvedere auf dem Pfingstberg) is a palace in the northern part of the New Garden in Potsdam, Germany, atop Pfingstberg mountain. It was commissioned by Friedrich Wilhelm IV and is only one part of an originally substantially more extensive building project. The twin-towered building was modelled on of Italian Renaissance architecture, and it was built between 1847 and 1863 with an interruption from 1852 till 1860. From sketches of from the king, the architechts Ludwig Persius, Friedrich August Stüler and Ludwig Ferdinand Hessian drew up details plans. The garden architect Peter Joseph Lenné was responsible for the design of the grounds.

    The building fell into disrepair, but was repaired between 1988 and 2005 by a group of local residents. Today, the belvedere is open for tourists.

  • Sanssouci
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Sanssouci

    Sanssouci is the name of the former summer palace of Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, in Potsdam, near Berlin. It is often counted among the German rivals of Versailles. While Sanssouci is in the more intimate Rococo style and is far smaller than its French Baroque counterpart, it too is notable for the numerous temples and follies in the park. The palace was designed by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff between 1745 and 1747 to fulfill King Frederick's need for a private residence where he could relax away from the pomp and ceremony of the Berlin court. The palace's name emphasises this; it is a French phrase (sans souci), which translates as "without concerns", meaning "without worries" or "carefree", symbolising that the palace was a place for relaxation rather than a seat of power. The palace is little more than a large, single-story villa—more like the Château de Marly than Versailles. Containing just ten principal rooms, it was built on the brow of a terraced hill at the centre of the park. The influence of King Frederick's personal taste in the design and decoration of the palace was so great that its style is characterised as "Frederician Rococo", and his feelings for the palace were so strong that he conceived it as "a place that would die with him". Because of a disagreement about the site of the palace in the park, Knobelsdorff was fired in 1746. Jan Bouman, a Dutch architect, finished the project.

    During the 19th century, the palace became a residence of Frederick William IV. He employed the architect Ludwig Persius to restore and enlarge the palace, while Ferdinand von Arnim was charged with improving the grounds and thus the view from the palace. The town of Potsdam, with its palaces, was a favourite place of residence for the German imperial family until the fall of the Hohenzollern dynasty in 1918.

    After World War II, the palace became a tourist attraction in East Germany. It was fully maintained with due respect to its historical importance, and was open to the public. Following German reunification in 1990, the final wish of Frederick came to pass: his body was finally returned to his beloved palace and buried in a new tomb overlooking the gardens he had created. Sanssouci and its extensive gardens became a World Heritage Site in 1990 under the protection of UNESCO; in 1995, the Foundation for Prussian Palaces and Gardens in Berlin-Brandenburg was established to care for Sanssouci and the other former imperial palaces in and around Berlin. These palaces are now visited by more than two million people a year from all over the world.

  • Lehnin Abbey
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Lehnin Abbey

    Lehnin Abbey (German: Kloster Lehnin) is a former Cistercian monastery in Lehnin in Brandenburg, Germany. Since 1911 it has accommodated the Luise-Henrietten-Stift, a Protestant women's community.

    Buildings

    Lehnin Abbey remains significant for its architecture, as one of the finest brick Gothic structures in Germany. The ruins were extremely well restored in the 1870s.

  • Sanssouci Park
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Sanssouci Park

    Sanssouci Park is a large park surrounding Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam, Germany. Following the terracing of the vineyard and the completion of the palace, the surroundings were included in the structure. A baroque flower garden with lawns, flower beds, hedges and trees was created. In the hedge quarter 3,000 fruit trees were planted. The greenhouses of the numerous nurseries contained oranges, melons, peaches and bananas. The goddesses Flora and Pomona, who decorate the entrance obelisk at the eastern park exit, were placed there to highlight the connection of a flower, fruit and vegetable garden.

    With the expansion of the site after the creation of more buildings, a 2.5 km long straight main avenue was built. It began in the east at the 1748 obelisk and over the years was extended all the way to the New Palace, which marks its end in the west. In 1764 the picture gallery was constructed, followed by the New Chambers in 1774. They flank the palace and open the alley up to rondels with the fountains, surrounded by marble statues. From there paths lead in a star pattern between tall hedges to further parts of the gardens.

    In his organisation of the park, Frederick continued what he had begun in Neuruppin and Rheinsberg. During his stay as Crown Prince in Neuruppin, where he was commander of a regiment from 1732 to 1735, he ordered that a flower, fruit and vegetable garden be laid out in the grounds of his abode. He already deviated here from the classical organisation of baroque gardens, which concerned themselves purely with the model represented by Versailles, by combining the beautiful and the useful. He also followed this principle in Rheinsberg. Apart from the transformation of the palace, which Frederick received as a present from his father Frederick William I in 1734, he ordered the establishment of fruit and vegetable garden areas enclosed by hedges. In addition the central avenue and a larger intersecting avenue did not lead directly to the palace, as was usual in French parks of the era, but took off from the south wing and at a right angle to the building.

    Frederick invested heavily in the fountain system of Sanssouci Park, as water features were a firm component of baroque gardens. But the Neptune Grotto, finished in 1757 in the eastern part of the park, was used just as little for its intended function as the fountain facilities. Atop the Ruinenberg, roughly six hundred metres away, was a water basin from which no water could arrive into the park and because of the "fountaineers"' lack of expertise the project failed.

  • Brandenburg Gate (Potsdam)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Brandenburg Gate (Potsdam)

    The Brandenburg Gate (German: Brandenburger Tor) on the Luisenplatz in Potsdam, not to be confused with the gate of the same name on Berlin's Pariser Platz, was built in 1770/71 by Carl von Gontard and Georg Christian Unger by order of Frederick II of Prussia. It stands at the western end of Brandenburger Straße, which runs in a straight line up to the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul.

    Previously, from 1733, there was another, simpler gate on the same spot, which resembled a castle gateway. Together with the city wall, a form of toll or excise barrier, and the other gates it was intended to prevent desertion and smuggling.

    Towards the end of the Seven Years' War, Frederick the Great had the old gate demolished and built, in its stead, this new Brandenburg Gate, as a symbol of his victory. For that reason the Brandenburg Gate resembles a Roman triumphal arch. Its prototype was the Arch of Constantine in Rome. The Roman influence of its architectural style can be seen, for example, in the double columns of Corinthian order as well as the design of the attic.

    A feature of the Brandenburg Gate is that it has two completely different sides, designed by two architects. Carl von Gontard designed the city side, his pupil, Georg Christian Unger, the field or countryside-facing side. Gontard made the city side as a rendered facade with Corinthian-style lesenes and trophies, Unger designed the field site in the style of the Arch of Constantine with Corinthian double-columns and ornamentation like the golden trumpets. The two side entrances for pedestrians were not added until 1843, under Frederick William IV, in order to cope with the increase in pedestrian traffic.

    At that time people had to pass the Brandenburg Gate if they wanted to make their way to the town of Brandenburg, hence the name. The gate leads walkers into the city centre pedestrian zone of Brandenburger Straße in an easterly direction up to priory church of St. Peter and St. Paul.

    Since the city wall was demolished around 1900 the Brandenburg Gate has been a free-standing structure.

  • Chinese House (Potsdam)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Chinese House (Potsdam)

    The Chinese House (German: Chinesisches Haus) is a garden pavilion in Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. Frederick the Great had it built, about seven hundred metres southwest of the Sanssouci Summer Palace, to adorn his flower and vegetable garden. The garden architect was Johann Gottfried Büring, who between 1755 and 1764 designed the pavilion in the then-popular style of Chinoiserie, a mixture of ornamental rococo elements and parts of Chinese architecture.

    The unusually long building time of nine years is attributed to the Seven Years' War, during which Prussia's economic and financial situation suffered significantly. Only after the end of the war in 1763 were the chambers inside the pavilion furnished. As the building served not only as a decorative piece of garden architecture but also as a setting for small social events, Frederick the Great ordered the building of a Chinese Kitchen, a few metres south-east of the Chinese House. After a conversion in 1789, only the hexagonal windows show the Oriental character of the former outbuilding. A few years later, the Dragon House was built in the form of a Chinese pagoda on the northern edge of Sanssouci Park bordering Klausberg. The building was Frederick the Great's attempt to follow the Chinese fashion of the 18th century, which began in France before spreading to England, Germany, and Russia.

  • Roman Baths (Potsdam)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Roman Baths (Potsdam)

    The Roman Baths (German: die Römischen Bäder), northeast of the Charlottenhof Palace in the Sanssouci Park in Potsdam, reflect the Italiensehnsucht ("Sehnsucht/longing for Italy") of its creator Frederick William IV of Prussia. Various Roman and antiquated Italian styles were melded into the architectural ensemble created between 1829 and 1840.

    While still a crown prince Frederick William commissioned both Charlottenhof (1826-1829) and the Roman baths (1834-1840). Coming up with numerous ideas and drawing many actual drafts, the artistically-gifted heir to the throne had great influence on the plans of the architect, Karl Friedrich Schinkel. Charged with managing the actual construction was one of Schinkel's students, Ludwig Persius.

    The garden house (Gärtnerhaus) (1829-30) and the house for its keepers (Gärtnergehilfenhaus) (1832) were both built in Italian country house style (Landhausstil). The Roman bath for which the whole ensemble was named was styled after ancient villas. Together with the tea-pavilion (Teepavillon) (1830), modelled on temples of antiquity, it forms the complex of buildings, tied together by pergolas, arcades and sections of garden. The individual buildings were largely inspired by Schinkel's second trip to Italy in 1828. Thus the Roman bath, which has never been bathed in, came to be thanks purely to the romantic fantasy of the royal Italophile.

  • Church of Peace (Sanssouci)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Church of Peace (Sanssouci)

    The Protestant Church of Peace (German: Friedenskirche) is situated in the Marly Gardens on the Green Fence in the palace grounds of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam, Germany. The church was built according to the wishes and with the close involvement of the artistically gifted King Frederick William IV and designed by the court architect, Ludwig Persius. After Persius' death in 1845, the architect Friedrich August Stüler was charged with continuing his work. Building included work by Ferdinand von Arnim and Ludwig Ferdinand Hesse also.

    The cornerstone of the churchhouse was laid on April 14, 1845. The building was dedicated on September 24, 1848, though construction continued until 1854. The structure resembles a High Italian monastery.

  • Antique Temple
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Antique Temple

    The Antique Temple is a small round temple in the west part of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. Frederick the Great had the building constructed to house his collection of antique artifacts, coins and antique gems. Carl von Gontard created the building in 1768/69 near the New Palace north of the Central Alley, as a complement to the Temple of Friendship situated south of the Alley. Since 1921 the Antique Temple has been used as a mausoleum for members of the House of Hohenzollern and is not open to the public.

    Usage under Frederick the Great

    The Antique Temple was, like the Sanssouci Picture Gallery, envisioned from the beginning as a museum and at the time of Frederick the Great could be visited after notifying the castellan at the New Palace. Next to dozens of antique ornaments, such as marble urns, bronze figurines, tools, weights and ceramics, could be found the so-called 'Family of Lycomedes', ten life-sized marble statues on marble plinths. They came to Frederick the Great from the art collection of the French Cardinal Melchior de Polignac. Fifty busts of marble, basalt and bronze sat on brackets, 31 of which also came from Polignac's collection; the rest were from Friedrich's favourite sister, Princess Wilhelmine, Margravine of Brandenburg-Bayreuth. In a square annex that could only be reached through opening a door from the round central hall, the Coin Chamber was created. Four cedar wood cupboards were filled with over 9,200 gold, silver and bronze coins, around 4,370 engraved gems and cameos, 48 marble, terra cotta and bronze reliefs, and books from Frederick the Great's archaeological library.

  • Belvedere auf dem Klausberg
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Belvedere auf dem Klausberg

    The Belvedere auf dem Klausberg is a building in Sanssouci Park in Potsdam, Germany.

    Architecture

    Georg Christian Unger based his plans on a drawing by the Italian archeologist Francesco Bianchini from his 1738 volume Del Palazzo de' Cesari. Biancini had tried to reconstruct the Imperial Palace on the Palatine Hill in ancient Rome. The only sources he used were ancient writers, parts of the ruins, and an inscription of a building with fountains on a coin he found in the Nero-erected market marcelum magnum in Rome. The ancient gold piece shows an enclosed room, an open rotunda with a vaulted ceiling, and attached on both sides to open walkways.

  • Dragon House (Sanssouci)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dragon House (Sanssouci)

    Dragon House (German Drachenhaus) is a historical building in Potsdam, Germany, built by King Frederick the Great of Prussia on the southern slope of the Klausberg, which borders the northern edge of Sanssouci Park. It was constructed between 1770 and 1772 in the prevailing Chinoiserie taste of the time, designed to imitate a Chinese pagoda. Carl von Gontard was commissioned to build it.

    The Dragon House is named after the sixteen dragons on the corners of its concave roofs. Six years after the construction of the Chinese House in Sanssouci Park, Frederick's enthusiasm for Chinoiserie park structures was expressed once again with this creation.

    Frederick the Great was stimulated to build in a Far Eastern style by Sir William Chambers's Designs of Chinese Buildings" (1757) and from his Plans, elevations, section and perspective views of the gardens and buildings at Kew" (1763). These architectural reference books were given to Frederick by the author, who had created for Augusta, Princess of Wales a large garden at Kew (near London), in which there still stands Chambers's many-tiered tapering pagoda, completed in 1762.

    The Dragon House at Sanssouci was built on an octagonal plan, with four floors not only to be decorative, but also as living quarters for the wine-growers who worked on the neighbouring Weinberg. However, they did not move into the pagoda. To save the pagoda from its dilapidated state, it had to be restored in 1787. Ever since then it has been constantly inhabited by the overseer of the Belvedere on the Klausberg. Over the years, because of its inhabitation, an additional room, a laundry and three stables have extended the two rooms—a kitchen and an entrance hall—of the structure. The Dragon House has been used since 1934 in a gastronomical capacity.

  • Temple of Friendship
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Temple of Friendship

    The Temple of Friendship (German: Freundschaftstempel) is a small, round temple in the western part of Sanssouci Park in Potsdam. It was built by the Prussian king Frederick II in memory of his favorite sister, Markgravine Wilhelmine of Bayreuth, who died in 1758. The temple was built south of the park's main boulevard between 1768 and 1770 by architect Carl von Gontard, complementing the Temple of Antiquities, which lies due north of the boulevard on an axis with the Temple of Friendship.

    The Pavilion in Sanssouci Park

    To honor the memory of Wilhelmine, Frederick chose, as he had in Neuruppin, the form of an open, round temple with a shallow domed roof supported by eight corinthian columns. This architectural structure, the monopteros type, has its origins in ancient Greece, where such buildings were erected over cult statues and tombstones.

    In a shallow alcove at the back wall of the temple is a life-sized statue of Wilhelmine of Bayreuth, holding a book in her hand. The marble figure is from the workshop of the sculptor brothers Johann David and Johann Lorenz Whilhem Räntz and is based on a portrait by the court painter Antoine Pesne. The medallions on the columns depicting pairs of friends in classical antiquity as well as the book in Wilhelmine's hand point to her fascination with that era. Moreover, the homoerotic dimension of the classical couples may have made them especially appealing to the temple's builder, Frederick II, whose possible homosexuality was the subject of much speculation and rumor.

  • Historic Mill of Sanssouci
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Historic Mill of Sanssouci

    Thanks to the legend of The Miller of Sanssouci (German: Der Müller von Sanssouci), the Historic Mill (Historische Mühle) became a famous well beyond the boundary of Potsdam in Germany and associated especially with Frederick the Great and his summer palace of Sanssouci.

    Legend

    The legend of the Miller of Sanssouci first appeared in 1787 in a French book about the life of Frederick the Great (Vie de Frédéric II by an anonymous author) and in a watered-down form one year later in Germany.

    The legend goes that Frederick the Great was being disturbed by the clatter of the mill sails and offered to buy the mill from its miller, Johann William Grävenitz. When he refused, the king is supposed to have threatened: "Does he not know that I can take the mill away from him by virtue of my royal power without paying one groschen for it?" Whereupon the miller is supposed to have replied: "Of course, your majesty, your majesty could easily do that, if – begging your pardon – it were not for the Supreme Court in Berlin."

    This is only a legend. According to Frederick the Great the mill underscored the rural character of his summer palace and said "that, ... the mill is an ornament for the palace." The miller was reportedly a difficult man, who cheated the local farmers over their flour and constantly pestered the king with petitions. At least one of these petitions was heard by Frederick II. Grävenitz pointed to the fact that, as a result of the construction of the palace, the post mill no longer stood in the open, but was partly shielded from the wind. So he demanded that the king let him build the mill in another site and to pay him for it. Frederick II acceded to this, with the result that, shortly thereafter, the wily Grävenitz was the proud possessor of two mills thanks to the king's grace, until he eventually resold the old mill.

    In 1768 there was a legal dispute at another location over water rights and the remaining lease between Christian Arnold, the tenant of a mill in Pommerzig in the Neumark, and his landlord, the Count of Schmettau. After the miller was found guilty on two accounts, he appealed to Frederick the Great, who intervened in the ongoing proceedings in favour of the miller. Wrongly, as it turned out later. The king referred the case to the Berlin Court of Appeal, who once again ruled against the miller. Frederick the Great, then demanded a condemnation of the judges and their imprisonment in Spandau Citadel for their unjust judgments and thus precipitated an abuse of his name.

    This legal battle and the story of the Sanssouci miller were woven together in the legend and were intended to emphasize the king's justice towards all his subjects. After the death of Frederick the Great, the case was reopened. His nephew and successor, Frederick William II decided in a compromise that "... the Miller Arnold case ... should be viewed as the consequence of a mistake, whereby the praiseworthy judicial zeal of our royal uncle, who rests in God, was misled by incomplete, inadequate reporting of the true situation by badly informed and preoccupied [biased] people."

    In the years that followed there continued to be disputes between the reigning kings and the millers for different reasons.

  • Neptune Grotto
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Neptune Grotto

    The Neptune Grotto (German: Neptungrotte) close to the Obelisk entrance in Sanssouci Park, Potsdam, was created by Frederick the Great between 1751 and 1757 to beautify the park.

    Built following plans by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff it arose as a representation of the revived interest in garden architecture. The grotto ought to have been a component of the numerous fountains of the park, which did not function at that time, owing to a lack of technical knowledge.

    The trident wielding god of the sea, Neptune, establishes a relationship to water. The conches on the sides, arranged into the shape of waterfalls and the great shell inside, made from many real shells, are a characteristic theme of Rococo.

  • Bornstedt Crown Estate
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Bornstedt Crown Estate

    The Bornstedt Crown Estate is a former royal estate and, today, a tourist attraction in the Potsdam borough of Bornstedt. It belongs to the enemble of palaces and gardens of Sanssouci Park, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    The estate - the former seat of Crown Princess Victoria - is now completely restored and open to the public. It occupies a picturesque location on the shore of the Lake Bornstedt, just 400 metres away from Sanssouci Palace. Its history goes back to 1350.

    The Bornstedt Crown Estate is not far from Potsdam city centre. Throughout the year, traditional festivities, markets, and major events take place here. On a tour of the Brandenburg Factory, visitors will learn about more than 21 trades such as pottery and candle making; there is also on-site goldsmith. A barber's shop, bookstore, weaver's and florist complement the wide variety of trades.

    Today, a variety of events take place here that are open to the public. Special events include: the historical Christmas market, the drilling and recruiting exercises of the Potsdam Giants, re-enactors wearing the uniforms of Frederick II’s Grand Grenadiers, an art market, a farmers' market, beer market, British Days, Crown Estate Spectacular, concerts, plays, exhibitions and even sporting events like the Palaces Marathon, that starts and finishes at the Bornstedt Crown Estate.

  • Botanical Garden, Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Botanical Garden, Potsdam

    The Botanical Garden in Potsdam (German: Botanischer Garten Potsdam or Botanischer Garten der Universität Potsdam), is a botanical garden and arboretum maintained by the University of Potsdam. It has a total area of 8.5 hectares, of which 5 hectares are open to the public, and is located immediately southwest of the Orangery Palace at Maulbeerallee 2, Potsdam, in the German state of Brandenburg. It is open daily; an admission fee is charged.

    The garden was established in 1950 on two adjacent plots of land: part of the Sanssouci Park, and the Paradise Garden (about 2.5 hectares). After World War II, the Sanssouci park was controlled by the Red Army, and briefly formed a branch of the Moscow Botanical Garden of Academy of Sciences. In 1950 today's garden was created at the northern edge of Sanssouci with the Maulbeerallee dividing the garden into two distinct areas. To the north is the Paradise Garden, now a teaching and display garden; and to the south side is the institute building, greenhouses, and outdoor space.

    Today the garden cultivates about 9,000 taxa, with excellent collections of succulents (880), Begoniaceae (89 spp.), Araceae (c.250 spp.), Aizoaceae (c.260 spp.), Haworthia (55 spp.), ferns (230), Australian Proteaceae, orchids (320), chimaeras, invasive species, and Chinese medical herbs.

    The garden cultivates about 4,000 taxa outdoors, including 50 species from Brandenburg that are threatened with extinction. Major outdoor sections include an arboretum; collections from East Asia and Eurasian steppes; the Central European deciduous forest; North American prairies; an alpine garden; rhododendrons; wild flowers; a rose garden; marsh and aquatic plants; morphological gardens illustrating a variety of leaves, shoots, roots, flowers, and fruit; useful plants including dyeing, fiber, and food crops; medicinal and aromatic plants; and protected and endangered plants from Germany.

    The garden's ten greenhouses (approximately 3,000 m² total area) contain about 4,600 tropical and subtropical species in a palm house, epiphyte house, orchid house, fern house, cactus house, aquarium house, Victoria house, etc. These houses also contain coffee and cocoa trees, sugarcane, cotton, cassava, guava, begonias, and carnivorous plants.

  • Green Gate, Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Green Gate, Potsdam

    The Green Gate (German: Grünes Gitter) in Potsdam is the main gateway into Sanssouci Park and is situated at the end of the avenue to Sanssouci Palace. This begins as one of three roads that radiate from the Luisenplatz square. The gate was designed by Ludwig Ferdinand Hesse and was put up in 1854 as part of the construction of the Church of Peace. Its name comes from the colour in which the gate was painted. Additional ornamentation is provided by individual bars and points being picked up in gold leaf. The iron gate bears the initials of Frederick William IV.

  • New Garden, Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    New Garden, Potsdam

    The New Garden (German: Neuer Garten) in Potsdam is a park of 102.5 hectares located southwest of Berlin, Germany, in northern Potsdam and bordering on the lakes Heiliger See and Jungfernsee. Location of the New Garden north of downtown Potsdam.

    Starting in 1787, Frederick William II of Prussia (1744-1797) arranged to have a new garden laid out on this site, and it came to be known by this rather prosaic name. The New Garden is one of the ensembles comprising the UNESCO World Heritage Site "Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin," a status awarded in 1990.

  • Dairy in the New Garden
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Dairy in the New Garden

    The Dairy in the New Garden was built to plans by the master builder, Carl Gotthard Langhans, on the shore of the Jungfernsee lake at the northernmost tip of the New Garden in Potsdam, Germany. Construction was carried out from 1790 to 1792 by Andreas Ludwig Krüger.

    In the course of laying out the landscape garden and building the Marble Palace under Frederick William II of Prussia, a dairy was built to supply the royal court. Cows grazing on the surrounding land produced milk for the manufacture of butter and cheese.

    In 1843/1844 Frederick William IV. had the building extended. To a design by the architect Ludwig Persius a second storey was added under the direction of Ludwig Ferdinand Hesse and the southwest corner was enhanced with a tower. Battlements run along the edges of the roof and give the building a Norman character.

  • St. Nicholas' Church, Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    St. Nicholas' Church, Potsdam

    St. Nicholas' Church (German: St. Nikolaikirche) in Potsdam is an Evangelical church on the Alter Markt ("Old Market Square") in Potsdam. The central plan building in the Classicist style and dedicated to Saint Nicholas was built to plans by Karl Friedrich Schinkel in the years 1830 to 1837. The tambour of the 77 metre high church that towers above the roofs of the city was built later, from 1843 to 1850. Its construction was taken over by Ludwig Persius and, from 1845, Friedrich August Stüler.

    Towards the end of the Second World War the church was hit during the air raid on Potsdam and subsequently badly damaged by Soviet artillery fire. After many years of rebuilding the church was re-consecrated in 1981 by the Evangelical Parish of St. Nicholas, Potsdam, and, today, is open to visitors. In addition to the normal church services, concert events are also held in the church.

  • Babelsberg Studio
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Babelsberg Studio

    The Babelsberg Film Studio (German: Filmstudio Babelsberg, FWB: BG1), located in Potsdam-Babelsberg, Germany, is the oldest large-scale film studio in the world. Founded in 1912, it covers an area of about 25,000 square metres (270,000 sq ft). Hundreds of films, including Fritz Lang's Metropolis and Josef von Sternberg's The Blue Angel were filmed there.

    Today, Studio Babelsberg remains operational mainly for feature film productions. Furthermore, it acts as co-producer on international high budget productions.

  • Einstein Tower
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Einstein Tower

    The Einstein Tower (German: Einsteinturm) is an astrophysical observatory in the Albert Einstein Science Park in Potsdam, Germany built by Erich Mendelsohn. It was built on the summit of the Potsdam Telegraphenberg to house a solar telescope designed by the astronomer Erwin Finlay-Freundlich. The telescope supports experiments and observations to validate (or disprove) Albert Einstein's relativity theory. The building was first conceived around 1917, built from 1919 to 1921 after a fund-raising drive, and became operational in 1924. Although Einstein never worked there, he supported the construction and operation of the telescope. It is still a working solar observatory today as part of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam. Light from the telescope is directed down through the shaft to the basement where the instruments and laboratory are located. There were more than half a dozen telescopes in the laboratory.

    This was one of Mendelsohn's first major projects, completed when a young Richard Neutra was on his staff, and his best-known building.

    The exterior was originally conceived in concrete, but due to construction difficulties with the complex design and shortages from the war, much of the building was actually realized in brick, covered with stucco. Because the material was changed during construction of the building, the designs were not updated to accommodate them. This caused many problems, such as cracking and dampness. Extensive repair work had to be done only five years after the initial construction, overseen by Mendelsohn himself. Since then numerous renovations have been done periodically.

    The building was heavily damaged by Allied bombing during World War II, leaving it in a state that, as the architecture blog A456 noted, was ironically more in line with Mendelsohn's conceptual sketches than the pre-war structure was. It underwent a full renovation in 1999, for its 75th anniversary, to correct problems with dampness and decay that had meant decades of repair. It is often cited as one of the few landmarks of expressionist architecture.

    According to lore, Mendelsohn took Einstein on a long tour of the completed structure, waiting for some sign of approval. The design, while logical and perfectly sufficient to its purpose, stood out like an "ungainly spaceship" in the suburbs of Potsdam. Einstein said nothing until hours later, during a meeting with the building committee, when he whispered his one-word judgment: "Organic". (Otto Friedrich, Before the Deluge.) Mendelsohn himself said that he had designed it out of some unknown urge, letting it emerge out of "the mystique around Einstein's universe" (Wolf von Eckardt, Erich Mendelsohn.)

  • Museum FLUXUS+
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Museum FLUXUS+

    The museum FLUXUS+ is located in Potsdam, Germany and opened in the city’s new cultural centre Schiffbauergasse in April 2008. It is Potsdam's first museum of modern art. The 1000 sqm exhibition space of the two-storey building comprehends artworks from private collections. With its large art+life-shop, its café, an “atrium” for temporary exhibitions and events, the museum FLUXUS+ has become a cultural meeting point not only for artists and art-lovers.

    The permanent exhibition of the museum FLUXUS+ consists of artworks, documents and films of and about the international and intermedia art movement fluxus. On the ground floor, it features works of Wolf Vostell, Emmet Williams, Ben Patterson, Nam June Paik, and other artists of the 1960s. Besides, works of artists like Arman, Lebel, Christo, Niki de Saint-Phalle, Hains, Leve, and Ann Noël are presented in order to give a general idea of the avant-garde of the second half of the 20th Century. The exhibits on the second floor of the museum focus on the art and lifework of Wolf Vostell. Here, rather the smaller art objects, sketches, and paintings than oversized works of Vostell reflect his motto “Leben ist Kunst. Kunst ist Leben”. The collection comprehends some of Vostell’s earliest sketches as well as works that he completed shortly before his death, thus, illustrates his work as a fluxus-and happening-artist, designer, composer, painter, and video pioneer. Furthermore, the museum features today’s interpretation of “Kunst ist Leben” by presenting the works of four contemporary artists: Costantino Ciervo, Hella De Santarossa, Lutz Friedel, and Sebastian Heiner.

  • KGB Prison, Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    KGB Prison, Potsdam

    The KGB Prison at Leistikowstraße 1 in the German city of Potsdam was a detention centre run by the Soviet counter-intelligence organisation, SMERSH.

    The building was originally built in 1916–18 by the Evangelical Ecclesiastical Benevolent Society (Evangelisch Kirchlichen Hilfsverein) or EKH. After the Potsdam Conference in August 1945 about 100 houses in the Nauener Vorstadt quarter, which bordered on the New Garden, were cordoned off and renamed as Military Camp No. 7 (Militärstädtchen No.7). In this area were located the command centre of the KGB for Germany, which was housed in the former boarding school attended by Empress Augusta Victoria. The neighbouring building of the women's benevolent society (Leistikowstraße 1, previously Mirbachstraße 1) was used as the counter-intelligence detention centre.

  • Weißer See (Potsdam)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Weißer See (Potsdam)

    Weißer See is a lake in Brandenburg, Germany. At an elevation of 29.4 metres, its surface area is 0.26 km². The Sacrow–Paretz Canal flows through the lake.

  • Templiner See
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Templiner See

    Templiner See is a lake in the state of Brandenburg, Germany. It stretches to the south and west from the centre of the city of Potsdam.

    The lake is some 5.8 kilometres (3.6 mi) long, with a maximum width of 1.2 kilometres (0.75 mi) and a surface area is 5.11 square kilometres (1.97 sq mi). It lies at an elevation of 29.4 metres (96 ft) above sea level, and has a maximum depth of 6 metres (20 ft). The navigable River Havel flows through the lake, entering it at its northern end adjacent to central Potsdam, and leaving it at its southern end via a short channel to the Schwielowsee between Caputh and Geltow. The lake is crossed by two cable ferries, the Kiewitt Ferry towards its northern end, and the Caputh Ferry at its southern exit. Navigation is administered as part of the Untere Havel–Wasserstraße.

    At the northern end of the lake, the peninsula of Hermannswerder protrudes into the lake. At about its midpoint, the lake is crossed by the Berlin outer ring railway, using an embankment and bridge. This was built in the 1950s, to bypass West Berlin during the division of Germany.

  • Jungfernsee
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Jungfernsee

    The Jungfernsee (translated "Virgins Lake") is located north of Potsdam, Germany. It was a glacial kettle and is now part of the River Havel, which runs along its southeastern shore, which is also the only part of its shores that is in Berlin. The rest of the Lake lies in the Potsdam district.

    It spans 3.52 km in a northwest-southeast direction, widens to 1.45 km in the southeast from just 180 m at its narrowest point. The lake is part of a federal waterway and one point where the Sacrow–Paretz Canal connects to the Havel. Until 1990, there was a border crossing for ships on the lake, at the end of the canal.

    On the lake's southern end at the outflow of the Havel is the Glienicke Bridge, also known as the Bridge of Spies. Besides that, other sights around the Jungfernsee include Cecilienhof to the southwest, the Heilandskirche in Sacrow to the north and the park and palace of Glienicke, southeast again. The former royal Dairy in the New Garden also lies on the shore of the lake and is today a restaurant and brewery.

    In 1999, the south shore was added to the Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin World Heritage Site.

  • Villa Ingenheim
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Villa Ingenheim

    The Villa Ingenheim is an historic building in the suburbs west of Brandenburg Potsdam. Located at Zeppelinstraße 127/128, the property is now used by the German Armed Forces Military History Research Office.

  • Stadtschloss, Potsdam
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Stadtschloss, Potsdam

    The Potsdam City Palace (German: Potsdamer Stadtschloss) was a historical building in Potsdam, Germany. It was the second official residence (the winter residence) of the margraves and electors of Brandenburg, later kings in Prussia, kings of Prussia and German emperors. It stood on the Old Market in Potsdam, next to the Church of St. Nicholas (Nikolaikirche) and the Old Townhall.

    A reconstruction of the City Palace is underway, as a new construction but with the historic facade and including numerous original components. Once completed (planned for late 2012), it will serve as the new parliament house of the federal state of Brandenburg.

  • Potsdamer Platz
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Potsdamer Platz

    Potsdamer Platz (German: [potsdamaː plats] ( listen), literally Potsdam Square) is an important public square and traffic intersection in the centre of Berlin, Germany, lying about one kilometre south of the Brandenburg Gate and the Reichstag (German Parliament Building), and close to the southeast corner of the Tiergarten park. It is named after the city of Potsdam, some 25 km to the south west, and marks the point where the old road from Potsdam passed through the city wall of Berlin at the Potsdam Gate. After developing within the space of little over a century from an intersection of rural thoroughfares into the most bustling traffic intersection in Europe, it was totally laid waste during World War II and then left desolate during the Cold War era when the Berlin Wall bisected its former location. Since German reunification, Potsdamer Platz has been the site of major redevelopment projects.

  • Palaces and Parks of Potsdam UNESCO World Heritage Site
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Palaces and Parks of Potsdam UNESCO World Heritage Site

    In 1990, UNESCO granted large areas of Potsdam World Heritage status, including Sanssouci park, Neuer Garten, Babelsberg and Glienicke with their palaces, the Pfaueninsel (Peacock Island), and also the Sacrow palace and park, along with its Church of the Redeemer. Fourteen other areas were added to Potsdam's World Cultural Heritage list in 1999. Lindstedt palace and park, the Russian colony Alexandrowka, and the Pfingstberg with the Belvedere and the Sternwarte Astronomical Observatory in the Babelsberg park were among them.
  • Cecilienhof
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Cecilienhof

    Schloss Cecilienhof is a palace in the northern part of the Neuer Garten park in Potsdam, Germany, close to the Jungfernsee lake. It has been part of the Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1990.

    Cecilienhof was the last palace built by the Hohenzollern family. Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany had it erected for his son, Crown Prince Wilhelm of Germany, and the crown prince's wife Duchess Cecilie of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. The house was designed by Paul Schultze-Naumburg to look like an English Tudor country house and built between 1914 and 1917. Its design was based on a house called 'Bidston Court' (later 'Hillbark') on the Wirral Peninsula. which in turn was inspired by Little Moreton Hall. The interior was furnished according to plans by Paul Troost, who originally had designed steamship décors.

    The brick and oak timberframe building, including six courtyards and 55 carved brick chimney tops, should have been completed in 1915, but construction was delayed due to the outbreak of World War I and Crown Prince Wilhelm and Cecilie could not move in until August 1917. Wilhelm followed his father into exile one year later, while Cecilie stayed at the palace until she fled from the approaching Red Army in February 1945.

    Cecilienhof was the location of the Potsdam Conference between 17 July and 2 August 1945. The rooms had been largely refurnished to match the taste of the participants. Winston Churchill, later Clement Attlee, Joseph Stalin and Harry S. Truman met at the round table in the great hall. On 26 July 1945, Churchill and Truman issued the Potsdam Declaration defining the terms for Japanese surrender, while Truman had already given order to prepare the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    Today Cecilienhof is a museum as well as a hotel. Queen Elizabeth II visited Cecilienhof on 3 November 2004. On 30 May 2007, the palace was used for the G8 foreign ministers summit.

  • Charlottenhof Palace
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Charlottenhof Palace

    Charlottenhof Palace or Charlottenhof Manor (German: Schloss Charlottenhof) is located southwest of Sanssouci Palace in Sanssouci Park at Potsdam, Germany. It is most famous as the summer residence of Crown Prince Frederick William (later King Frederick William IV of Prussia). Today it is maintained by the Prussian Palaces and Gardens Foundation Berlin-Brandenburg.

    The park area with its various buildings can be traced back to the 18th century. After it had changed hands several times, King Frederick William III of Prussia bought the land that borders the south of Sanssouci Park and gave it to his son Frederick William and his wife Elisabeth Ludovika for Christmas in 1825.

    The Crown Prince charged the architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel with the remodeling of an already existing farm house and the project was completed at low cost from 1826 through 1829. In the end, Schinkel, with the help of his student Ludwig Persius, built a small neo-classical palace on the foundations of the old farm house in the image of the old Roman villas.

  • Marmorpalais
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Marmorpalais

    The Marmorpalais (marble palace) was a royal residence in Potsdam, eastern Germany, built on the grounds of the extensive Neuer Garten on the shores of Lake Heiliger See. The palace was commissioned by Frederick William II of Prussia and designed in the early classicist style by the architects Carl von Gontard and (from 1789) Carl Gotthard Langhans, designer of Berlin's Brandenburg Gate.

    The Marmorpalais was reserved for the private use of the king, who had an artistic temperament. With this new construction the nephew and successor of Frederick the Great dissociated himself from his childless uncle, whom he disliked and who favored earlier Baroque and Rococo forms.

    The red brick Marmorpalais was originally a two-story square building. A fine view of the surrounding gardens and lakes is possible from a round pavilion on the flat roof of the cubical structure. Among other buildings, the little castle on the Pfaueninsel in the Havel River was constructed as an eye-catcher. A stairway and gallery accessed from the roof lead into the belvedere. Sculptured putti carrying a basket of fruit decorate the tip of the pavilion. The palace got its name from the grey and white Silesian marble used for the decorative elements and partitioning structures.



What is your insider travel tip for Potsdam?

Travel Insider Tips for Potsdam

Potsdam Overview

Potsdam has several claims to national and international notability. In Germany, it has the status Windsor has in England. It was the residence of the Prussian kings until 1918. Around the city there are a series of interconnected lakes and unique cultural landscapes, in particular the parks and palaces of Sanssouci, the largest World Heritage Site in Germany. The Potsdam Conference, the major post-war conference between the victorious Allies, was held at another palace in the area, the Cecilienhof. Babelsberg, in Potsdam, is one of the leading centers of European film production. The Filmstudio Babelsberg is historically significant as the oldest large-scale film studio in the world. The Deutsches Filmorchester Babelsberg frequently records soundtracks for domestic and foreign-based film productions.

The most popular attraction in Potsdam is Sanssouci Park, 2 km west of the city center. In 1744, King Frederick the Great ordered the construction of a residence here, where he could live sans souci ("without worries", in the French spoken at the court). The park hosts a botanical garden (Botanischer Garten Potsdam) and many magnificent buildings

The Orangery Palace (Orangerieschloss), former palace for foreign royal guests

The New Palace (Neues Palais), built between 1763 and 1769 to celebrate the end of the Seven Years' War, in which Prussia ousted Austria from its centuries-long role as the dominant power in German affairs. It is a much larger and grander palace than Sanssouci, having over 200 rooms and 400 statues as decoration. It served as a guest house for numerous royal visitors.

The Charlottenhof Palace (Schloss Charlottenhof), a Neoclassical palace by Karl Friedrich Schinkel built in 1826

The Roman Baths (Römische Bäder), built by Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Ludwig Persius in 1829-1840. It is a complex of buildings including a tea pavilion, a Renaissance-style villa, and a Roman bathhouse

The Chinese Tea House, an 18th century pavilion built in a Chinese style, the fashion of the time.

The Old Market Square is Potsdam's historical center. For three centuries this was the site of the City Palace, a royal palace built in 1662. Under Frederick the Great, the palace became the winter residence of the Prussian kings. The palace was severely damaged by bombing in 1945 and demolished in 1961 by the Communist authorities. In 2002, the Gate of Fortune was rebuilt in its original historic position, which marks the first step in the reconstruction of the palace. The Old Market Square is dominated today by the dome of the Nicolas Church, built in 1837 in the classical style. It was the last work of Karl Friedrich Schinkel, who designed the building but did not live to see its completion. It was finished by his disciples Friedrich August Stüler and Ludwig Persius. The eastern side of the Market Square is dominated by the Old City Hall, built in 1755 by the Dutch architect Jan Bouman (1706-1776). It has a characteristic circular tower, crowned with a gilded Atlas bearing the world on his shoulders.

Potsdam's Brandenburg Gate; north of the Old Market Square is the oval French Church (Französische Kirche), erected in the 1750s by Boumann for the Huguenot community, and the Brandenburg Gate (built in 1770, not to be confused with the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin)

Another landmark of Potsdam is the two-street Dutch Quarter (Holländisches Viertel), an ensemble of buildings that is unique in Europe, with about 150 houses built of red bricks in the Dutch style. It was built between 1734 and 1742 under the direction of Jan Bouman to be used by Dutch craftsmen who had been invited to settle here by King Frederick Wilhelm I. Today this area is one of Potsdam's most visited districts.

Another interesting area of Potsdam is Babelsberg, a quarter east of the center, housing the UFA film studios (Babelsberg Studios), and an extensive park with some interesting buildings, including the Babelsberg Palace (Schloß Babelsberg, a neo-Gothic palace designed by Schinkel). The Einstein Tower was built between 1920 and 1924 by architect Erich Mendelsohn on the top of the Telegraphenberg.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Potsdam

The area around Potsdam shows occupancy since the Bronze Age and was part of Magna Germania as described by Tacitus. After the migrations Slavs moved in and Potsdam was probably founded after the 7th century as a settlement of the Heveller centred on a castle. It was first mentioned in a document in 993AD as Poztupimi, when Emperor Otto III gifted the territory to the Quedlinburg (Quedlinburg vacation rentals | Quedlinburg travel guide) Abbey. By 1317, it was mentioned as a small town. It gained its town charter in 1345. In 1573, it was still a small market town of 2,000 inhabitants. After the Thirty Years' War (1618-1648), Potsdam had lost nearly half of its population. Potsdam's fortunes changed dramatically when it was chosen in 1660 as the hunting residence of Frederick William I, Elector of Brandenburg, the core of the powerful state that later became the Kingdom of Prussia. It also housed a Prussian barracks. After the Edict of Potsdam in 1685, Potsdam became a centre of European immigration. Its religious freedom attracted people from France (Huguenots), Russia, the Netherlands and Bohemia. The edict accelerated population growth and economic recovery. Later, the city became a full residence of the Prussian royal family. The majestic buildings of the royal residences were built mainly during the reign of Frederick the Great. One of these is the Sanssouci Palace, famed for its formal gardens and Rococo interiors. Other royal residences include the Neues Palais and the Orangery. In the 19th century the city of Potsdam was the capital of the province of Potsdam. The province encompassed the former districts of Ucker Mark, the Mark of Priegnitz, and the greater part of the Middle Mark. It was situated between Pomerania and West Prussia on the north, and the province of Saxony on the south and west (Berlin, with a small surrounding district, was an enclave within the province of Potsdam, and had its own distinct government). Towards the north west the province was bounded by the River Elbe and the Havel, and on the north east by the River Oder. About 500,000 inhabitance lived in the province which covered an area of about 8,000 square miles, divided into thirteen circles: Prenzlow, Spandau and Ruppin. Potsdam, south west of Berlin (Berlin vacation rentals | Berlin travel guide), lay just outside West Berlin after the construction of the Berlin Wall. The walling off of West Berlin not only isolated Potsdam from West Berlin, but also doubled commuting times to East Berlin. The Glienicke Bridge across the Havel connected the city to West Berlin and was the scene of some Cold War exchanges of spies. After German reunification, Potsdam became the capital of the newly re-established state of Brandenburg. There are many ideas and efforts to reconstruct the original appearance of the city, most remarkably the Potsdam City Palace and the Garrison Church.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Potsdam has several claims to national and international notability. Until 1918, it was the residence of the Prussian kings. Potsdam is also important due to its architectural and landscape history. Around the city there are a series of interconnected lakes and unique cultural landscapes, in particular the parks and palaces of Sanssouci, the largest World Heritage Site in Germany. The Potsdam Conference, the major post-war conference between the victorious Allies, was held at another palace in the area, the Cecilienhof. Film buffs may also find something of interest in the city. Filmstudio Babelsberg, in Potsdam, is one of the leading centers of European film production and is the oldest large-scale film studio in the world.

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