[ source: Wikipedia ]

Have a question about Schleswig? Ask a local resident for special Schleswig insider tips ...

In case you have a specific question for Schleswig or would like a Schleswig insider tip from one of our local property owners and Schleswig experts. Simply add your question and enter your email address. You will typically receive responses from us soon, in many cases within less than 24 hours! Please note: We do not share your email address with with anyone. Responses will solely be sent from us.

I would like to also receive an occasional Live Like a German newsletter with special travel tips (at most once a month) and last minute Germany travel deals.
Thanks for submitting your question about Schleswig.
Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently one local expert assigned to Schleswig.

Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently more than local experts assigned to Schleswig.



Popular Points of Interest in and near Schleswig

  • Hedeby Viking Museum
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Hedeby Viking Museum

    The Hedeby Viking Museum (German: Wikinger Museum Haithabu) is a museum near the site of Hedeby, a former medieval city in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany focusing on the Viking Age history of the region. While the region is now in modern Germany, it was once the oldest city in Denmark until it was ceded in 1864. The museum features reconstructions of various Viking Age dwellings, ships, and houses numerous artifacts discovered during the ongoing archaeological research of the area.

  • Gottdorf Palace
    [ source: Museum website ]

    Gottdorf Palace

    Gottdorf Palace is the ancestral home of the Holstein-Gottorp branch of the House of Oldenburg. It is situated on an island in the Schlei, about 40 km from the Baltic Sea, and was first settled as an estate in 1161 as the residence of Bishop Occo of Schleswig when his former residence was destroyed. After the ducal lineage of Gottorp were forced to move out in 1702, the palace, now occupied by the Danish, fell into disuse and disrepair in 1713 under the reign of Frederick IV of Denmark. Pieces of furniture, art and other interior were gradually moved out of the palace, and the structures were used both as Danish and Prussian barracks in the 19th century.

    During World War II, the estate was used as a displaced persons camp. Since 1947, the palace has been renovated and restored through a series of efforts. The restoration was considered complete in 1996. The palace is now owned by a foundation of the State of Schleswig-Holstein and houses the State Art and Cultural History Museum and the State Archeological Museum.

    Hours: April - October: daily 10 am - 6pm. November - March: Tuesday - Friday 10am - 4pm, Saturday, Sunday & holidays 10am - 5pm.

    Admission to all museums Adults 8 €, Concessions 5 €.

  • Schleswig Cathedral
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Schleswig Cathedral

    Schleswig Cathedral, officially the Cathedral of St. Peter at Schleswig, is the main church of Schleswig and was the cathedral of the Bishop of Schleswig until the diocese was dissolved in 1624. It is now the church of a Lutheran bishop and ranks among the most important architectural monuments of Schleswig-Holstein. The foundation stone of this impressive building was laid in 1134. Schleswig’s cathedral is famous above all for its three-wing Bordesholm Altar – a masterpiece by Hans Brüggemann – and the Schwahl cloister. It’s also well worth visiting the viewing platform where you look out from a height of 65 metres.

  • Hedeby Viking Museum (Wikinger Museum Haithabu)
    [ source: Museum website ]

    Hedeby Viking Museum (Wikinger Museum Haithabu)

    The Hedeby Viking Museum (Wikinger Museum Haithabu) is a museum near the site of Hedeby, a former medieval city in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany focusing on the Viking Age history of the region. While the region is now in modern Germany, it was once the oldest city in Denmark until it was ceded in 1864. The museum features reconstructions of various Viking Age dwellings, ships, and houses numerous artifacts discovered during the ongoing archaeological research of the area.

    Hours: April - October: daily 9am - 5pm. November - March Tuesday - Sunday 10 am - 4pm.

    Admission: Adults 6 €, Concessions 3.50 €, Family Card 13 €.

  • Hedeby
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Hedeby

    Hedeby (Danish pronunciation: [ˈheːð̩byːˀ], Old Norse Heiðabýr, German Haithabu or Haddeby) was an important trading settlement in the Danish-northern German borderland during the Viking Age. It flourished from the 8th to the 11th centuries.

    The site is located towards the southern end of the Jutland Peninsula. It developed as a trading centre at the head of a narrow, navigable inlet known as the Schlei, which connects to the Baltic Sea. The location was favorable because there is a short portage of less than 15 km to the Treene River, which flows into the Eider with its North Sea estuary, making it a convenient place where goods and ships could be ported overland for an almost uninterrupted seaway between the Baltic and the North Sea and avoid a dangerous circumnavigation of Jutland.

    Hedeby was the largest Nordic city during the Viking Age and used to be the oldest city in Denmark until the site became part of Germany.

    The city of Schleswig was later founded on the other side of the Schlei, and gave the duchy its name. Old records mention two bridges connecting the two towns. Hedeby was abandoned after its destruction in 1066.

    The site of Hedeby is located in the Duchy of Schleswig, which was traditionally the personal territory of the kings of Denmark. But the Kingdom of Denmark lost the area to Austria and Prussia in 1864 in the Second Schleswig War, and it is now in Germany. Hedeby is now by far the most important archaeological site in Schleswig-Holstein. The Haithabu Museum was opened next to the site in 1985.

  • Gottorf Castle
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Gottorf Castle

    Gottorf Castle (German: Schloss Gottorf, Low German and Danish: Gottorp) is a castle and estate in the city of Schleswig, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It is the ancestral home of the Holstein-Gottorp branch of the House of Oldenburg. It is situated on an island in the Schlei, about 40 km from the Baltic Sea.

    It was first settled as an estate in 1161 as the residence of Bishop Occo of Schleswig when his former residence was destroyed. The Danish Duke of Schleswig acquired it through a purchase in 1268, and in 1340 it was transferred to the Count of Holstein at Rendsburg of the House of Schauenburg. The manor later, through maternal inheritance, became the possession of Christian I of Denmark, the first Danish monarch from the House of Oldenburg, in 1459.

    Both the island and the structure were extended through the years, and particularly during the 16th century. Frederick I, younger son of Christian I, made it his primary residence. In 1544 the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein were divided in three parts; Frederick's third son Adolf received one of these parts and made his residence at Gottorp. This state became known as the Duchy of Schleswig-Holstein-Gottorp.

  • Danevirke
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Danevirke

    The Danevirke (modern Danish spelling: Dannevirke; in Old Norse Danavirki ; in German Danewerk ; is a system of Danish fortifications in Schleswig-Holstein. This important linear defensive earthwork was constructed across the neck of the Cimbrian peninsula during Denmark's Viking Age. It was last used for military purposes in 1864.

    The Danevirke stretches from the marshes in the west of the peninsula to the town of Schleswig, which lies beside the Schlei (Danish: Slien) on the Baltic Sea coast, near the former Viking trade centre of Hedeby. Another wall, between the Schlei and the town of Eckernförde, defended the Schwansen peninsula.

    According to written sources, work on the Danevirke was started by the Danish King Gudfred in 808. Fearing an invasion by the Franks, who had conquered heathen Frisia over the previous 100 years and Old Saxony in 772 to 804, Godfred began work on an enormous structure to defend his realm, separating the Jutland peninsula from the northern extent of the Frankish empire.

    Carbon-14 dating however, dates the initial construction to be in the second half of the 7th century, and Chronological dating suggest that construction began not very long after 737 (a few decades before the reign of Gudfred).

  • Plön Castle
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Plön Castle

    Plön Castle (German: Plöner Schloss) in Plön is one of the largest castles in the north German state of Schleswig-Holstein and the only one located on a hill. The former Residenz of the Dukes of Schleswig-Holstein-Plön was built in the 17th century during the Thirty Years War and has had a colourful history in which it has, for example, been a school for military cadets and also a boarding school.

    The castle ended up in the possession of the state of Schleswig-Holstein, but they could not fund its renovation and so it had to be sold again. Since January 2002 it has belonged to the Fielmann Akademie Schloss Plön and, after extensive conversion, serves as a training and qualification centre for a branch of optometry. After being inaccessible to the general public for many years when it was a boarding school, its new owners have opened it to a limited extent to visitors.

  • Kiel Castle
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Kiel Castle

    Kiel Castle (German: Kieler Schloss) in Kiel in the north German state of Schleswig-Holstein was one of the secondary residences of the Gottorf dukes. The castle exhibited a very varied architectural history and in the more recent architectural period became one of the most important secular buildings in Schleswig-Holstein. The castle burned down during the Second World War and its ruins were largely carried away and replaced by a new building.



What is your insider travel tip for Schleswig?

Travel Insider Tips for Schleswig

Schleswig Overview

Schleswig takes it name from the Schlei, an inlet of the Baltic sea at the end of which it sits, and "vik" or "vig" which means bay in the old Viking language and modern Danish language. Schleswig or Slesvig therefore means bay of the Schlei. (There is also a suggestion that the state's namesake and the term Slesvig originated from a tribe of West Slavs who lived in "Slavsvick" between the 5th century and 10th century AD.)

Things to See in Schleswig

Schleswig Cathedral (1134), with the tomb of King Frederick I of Denmark

Gottorf castle (built 1161), former residence of the dukes

Holm: old fishing village at the Schlei shore

Hedeby, Viking settlement

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Schleswig

The Viking settlement of Hedeby, located south of the modern town, was first mentioned in 804. It was a powerful settlement in the Baltic region, dominating the area for more than 200 years. In 1050, following several destructions, the population was moved to the opposite shore of the Schlei, becoming the city of Schleswig. In 1066 Hedeby was finally destroyed, and Schleswig remained as a part of the Danish kingdom.

In 1544 the castle Gottorf became the residence of the local rulers. The dukes of Gottorf were vassals of the Danish kings and ruled over much of present day Schleswig-Holstein. In 1721, when the Great Northern War ended, the dukes of Gottorf lost their power and their land became Danish crown land. After the Second Schleswig War (1864), Schleswig was annexed by the Kingdom of Prussia.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Schleswig is a town in the northeastern part of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany. It is the capital of the Kreis (district) Schleswig-Flensburg. It has a population of about 27,000, the main industries being leather and food processing.

Where to stay in Schleswig?

Check out our selection of hand-selected and quality Schleswig vacation rentals and holiday apartments.