[ source: Wikipedia ]

Have a question about Weinheim? Ask a local resident for special Weinheim insider tips ...

In case you have a specific question for Weinheim or would like a Weinheim insider tip from one of our local property owners and Weinheim experts. Simply add your question and enter your email address. You will typically receive responses from us soon, in many cases within less than 24 hours! Please note: We do not share your email address with with anyone. Responses will solely be sent from us.

I would like to also receive an occasional Live Like a German newsletter with special travel tips (at most once a month) and last minute Germany travel deals.
Thanks for submitting your question about Weinheim.
Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently one local expert assigned to Weinheim.

Thanks for submitting your question to Live Like a German. We have currently more than local experts assigned to Weinheim.

Previously asked Weinheim questions and answers:

Here is a list of Weinheim questions that were already answered by our local residents and property owners. Please browse through them. In case you still have a question that is not answered here please use the form above.

Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

"During my visit to Weinheim 15 December, 2015, I saw an inscription, carved in red sandstone, but cannot puzzle out the meaning of the first word. Here is the inscription, located within the Rathaus courtyard: " ____ was soll, komm was woll"" (posted 01/16/2016)

I do not know the inscription itself. I suppose, but at times, that it is here to the German version of the old classic Doris Day "Que sera, sera". Or, as so beautifully translated into the song is called "Whatever will be, will be". From the meaning out I would say that it fully well is "Be what is, come what wanted." Should I convert times in the near future in the City Hall courtyard, I look even know if I find the inscription. Greetings from Weinheim Michael Fieger
Answer provided by Michael Fieger on 01/18/2016
This answer is helpful
I had sent you a mail already at 17:01:16 to 20.12 clock. I repeat: The popular saying "... what shall come, what wool" is colloquially and means: "I do not get upset (I do not drive me mad)" "It is but as it is to come (What does this. Fate has meant for me, will happen.) "I hope that the statement will help you and will contribute to a better understanding. Sincerely E. Illius
Answer provided by Elisabeth Illius on 01/18/2016
This answer is helpful

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Weinheim

  • Exotenwald Weinheim
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Exotenwald Weinheim

    The Exotenwald Weinheim (about 60 hectares) is a forest arboretum located beside the Schlosspark in Weinheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is open daily without charge.

    The arboretum was established in 1871 by Christian Friedrich Gustav Freiherr von Berckheim (1817–1889), former Minister of State and Großhofmeister at the court in Karlsruhe, on the grounds of a baroque estate founded in 1725. His initial plantings were extensive – between 1872–1883 he planted some 12,494 trees on 36 hectares – with specimens purchased predominantly from specialist nurseries in Orléans, Ghent, and Exeter. Approximately 1460 sequoia trees were planted in this interval within a 2 hectare site. Although the climate has not proved entirely hospitable, and the original catalog of 150 species has subsequently dwindled to about 50, many mature specimens still remain, including original plantings of Calocedrus decurrens, Sequoiadendron giganteum, Pinus jeffreyi, Pinus ponderosa, and Thuja plicata.

    After Gustav's death, the arboretum was neglected for several decades until his grandson, Christian Philipp Graf von Berckheim, became owner. He planted a further 8.25 hectares of exotic trees, with plantings in the years before World War II focused primarily on East Asia and especially Japan, including specimens of Cercidiphyllum japonicum, Cryptomeria japonica, and Magnolia hypoleuca. In 1955 the arboretum was sold to the state of Baden-Württemberg. Since then, it has been augmented with South American and New Zealand plantings, with continued expansion of its European, Asian, North American, and North African collections, and an emphasis on trees from China and Korea. It now contains about 130 tree species.

  • Schau- und Sichtungsgarten Hermannshof
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Schau- und Sichtungsgarten Hermannshof

    The Schau- und Sichtungsgarten Hermannshof (2.2 hectares), also known as the Hermannshof Weinheim, is a botanical garden located at Babostraße 5, Weinheim, Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It is open daily in the summer and weekdays in winter; admission is free.

    Today's garden was first established as a private garden over 200 years ago. It was acquired by the Freudenberg industrialist family in 1888, and in the 1920s redesigned by landscape architect Wiepking-Jürgen Heinrich Mann. Between 1981-1983 it was again redesigned as a public garden by landscape architect Hans Luz of Stuttgart, and is now a scientific institution jointly owned by the Freudenberg Company and the town of Weinheim.

    The garden cultivates about 2500 taxa arranged in naturalistic plantings, including two theme gardens: a peony collection (created 1998) and North American prairie garden (2001, 1500 m²) containing over 350 plants. It also contains a number of notable trees, including specimens of Platanus orientalis and Platanus × hispanica that are over 230 years old, as well as Cedrus atlantica, Ginkgo biloba, Magnolia denudata, Magnolia × soulangeana, Myrtus communis, and Sequoia dating from the late 19th century.

  • Wachenburg
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Wachenburg

    The About this sound Wachenburg is a castle on a hill overlooking Weinheim an der Bergstrasse, in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. It was built between 1907 and 1928 by the Weinheimer Senioren-Convent, a Corps of former students. The castle contains a restaurant with a nice view of the country.

  • Windeck Castle (Weinheim)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Windeck Castle (Weinheim)

    Windeck Castle (German: About this sound Burg Windeck) stands on a small hill in Weinheim on the Bergstraße. It was built around 1100 to protect the inhabitants of the Lorsch monastery.

    It was hugely damaged in 1674 by the troops of King Louis XIV of France. In 1960, the ruins were restored, the palace walls newly erected and the donjon safeguarded. It was acquired in 1978 by the city of Weinheim. In the 1980s, archaeological examinations and conservation works were carried out, and the ground plan was found, which gave an idea of the dimensions of the fortress. Today, the ruins of a fortress Windeck are classified as a historical monument. A beer garden operates on its premises.

  • Windeck Castle (Weinheim)
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Windeck Castle (Weinheim)

    Windeck Castle (German: Burg Windeck (help·info)) stands on a small hill in Weinheim on the Bergstraße. It was built around 1100 to protect the inhabitants of the Lorsch monastery.

    It was hugely damaged in 1674 by the troops of King Louis XIV of France. In 1960, the ruins were restored, the palace walls newly erected and the donjon safeguarded. It was acquired in 1978 by the city of Weinheim. In the 1980s, archaeological examinations and conservation works were carried out, and the ground plan was found, which gave an idea of the dimensions of the fortress. Today, the ruins of a fortress Windeck are classified as a historical monument.

    A beer garden operates on its premises.



What is your insider travel tip for Weinheim?

Travel Insider Tips for Weinheim

Weinheim Overview

Weinheim is a town in the north west of the state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany with 43,000 inhabitants, approximately 15 km north of Heidelberg (Heidelberg vacation rentals | Heidelberg travel guide) and 10 km northeast of Mannheim (Mannheim vacation rentals | Mannheim travel guide). Together with these cities, it makes up the Rhine-Neckar triangle.

Weinheim has the nickname Zwei-Burgen-Stadt, or Two-Castle city ('Burg' means 'fortress'), named after the two fortresses on the hill overlooking the town in the east on the edge of the Odenwald, the Windeck and the Wachenburg. Weinheim is situated on the Bergstraße (Mountain Road) on the western rim of the Odenwald. The old town lies in the valley, with the new part of town further to the west. The Market Square is filled with numerous cafes, as well as the old Rathaus (Council building). Further to the south is the Schlossgarten (Palace garden) and the Exotenwald (Exotic forest), which contains species of trees imported from around the world, but mostly from North America and Japan.

Things to See in Weinheim

Windeck Castle, originally built around 1100 to protect the Lorsch (Lorsch vacation rentals | Lorsch travel guide) monastery, it was badly damaged in the Thirty Years War and by Louis XIV of France.

Wachenburg Castle, built between 1907 and 1928 by student fraternities.

The Market Square

The Schloss, home of the town council

Gerberbach Quarter, old haunt of the leather makers

Schlosspark

Exotenwald

Weinheim's beautiful synagogue was destroyed on Kristallnacht.

Winheim's town museum occupies what used to be the headquarters of the Teutonic Order in the town and holds exhibits about Weinheim and its surroundings: archaeology from the prehistoric through to the Merovingian dynasty, the highlight of which is the so-called "Nächstenbacher Bronze-find" of 76 objects from the late Bronze Age; displays documenting the Medieval and modern social history of the town and works from contemporary artists.

[ source: wikipedia ]

More about the History of Weinheim

Weinheim celebrated its 1250th anniversary in 2005. The earliest record of Weinheim dates back to 755 AD, when the name Winenheim was recorded in the Lorscher Codex, the record book of the Lorsch (Lorsch vacation rentals | Lorsch travel guide) monastery. In 1000 AD, emperor Otto III bestowed Weinheim the right to hold markets, and in 1065 the right to mint and issue coins. A new town developed next to the old town from 1250. In 1308, the old town was transferred to the Palatinate. From 1368 onwards the whole town belonged to the Electoral Palatinate and its district Heidelberg (Heidelberg vacation rentals | Heidelberg travel guide) since the end of the 14th century. With the transfer to the duke of Baden in 1803, Weinheim became a regional centre, which was unified with the district of Mannheim (Mannheim vacation rentals | Mannheim travel guide) in 1936. From 1938 onwards Weinheim belonged to the new district of Mannheim until January 1, 1973, when the Rhine-Neckar district was formed. The name Weinheim does not derive from wine, which is grown in the region, but rather from Wino's Home

[ source: wikipedia ]

Weinheim is a town in the north west of the state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany with 43,000 inhabitants, approximately 15 km north of Heidelberg and 10 km northeast of Mannheim. Together with these cities, it makes up the Rhine-Neckar triangle.

Where to stay in Weinheim?

Check out our selection of hand-selected and quality Weinheim vacation rentals and holiday apartments.