[ source: Wikipedia ]

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Previously asked Worms questions and answers:

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Where can one get a great breakfast in the morning?

Are there any cultural highlights, museums?

Ideas for 2-3 activities and daytrips?

Good restaurants for dinner?

Typical tourist activities or places that one should NOT do, as they are not worthwhile doing.

Things can do to make it a fun and memorable evening?

How to get around and find best means of local transportation?

Where to find good quality groceries?

Are there any special local events?

Are there any local food specialties one should try out?

What makes this destination special? Why should one spend some time here during vacation?

Is there a good local deli or restaurant with lunch menu?

Are there any points of interest or local attractions?

"Is there a Baptist or Evangelical Church I could attend services at while in Worms Germany?" (posted 05/27/2015)

See more, otherwise I can not write it. http://www.baptisten-worms.de/
Answer provided by Klaus Gehrbrandt on 05/31/2015
This answer is helpful
Evangelical churches there are in Deutschkand everywhere-in Worms is opposite the cathedral. Was built with beautiful artistic Glasfensstern again after its destruction by American bombers on the war from 1944 to 1945. Rheinhessen is also a stronghold of the Methodists and Baptists. There are various communities around Worms. For salvation is certainly taken care of!
Answer provided by Fam. Lausecker on 05/29/2015
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What are good places to go for shopping?

Any sporting activites and recommendations to stay active?

Questions around the weather, different seasons, ...



Popular Points of Interest in and near Worms

  • St. Peter's Cathedral (Worms Cathedral)
    [ source: Wikimedia ]

    St. Peter's Cathedral (Worms Cathedral)

    The Cathedral of St Peter (German: Wormser Dom) is the principal church and chief building of Worms. Along with Speyer and Mainz, it ranks among the finest Romanesque churches along the Rhine. This magnificent basilica, with four round towers, two large domes, and a choir at each end, has an imposing exterior, though the impression produced by the interior is also one of great dignity and simplicity, heightened by the natural color of the red sandstone of which it is built. The Catholic Prince-Bishopric of Worms ceased to exist in 1800. Only the ground plan and the lower part of the western towers belong to the original building consecrated in 1110. The remainder was mostly finished by 1181, but the west choir and the vaulting were built in the 13th century, the elaborate south portal was added in the 14th century, and the central dome has been rebuilt.

    The ornamentation of the older parts is simple; even the more elaborate later forms show no high development of workmanship. Unique sculptures depicting salvation stories appear above the Gothic-era south doorway. The baptismal font contains five remarkable stone reliefs from the late 15th century. The church's original windows were destroyed by bombing in 1943; between 1965 to 1995 new windows were made by Mainz artist Alois Plum.

    Hours: April—October: 9am—6pm, November—March: 9am—5pm.

  • Jewish Cemetary
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Jewish Cemetary

    The Jewish Cemetery in Worms or Heiliger Sand, is usually called the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe, although the Jewish burials in the Jewish sections of the Roman catacombs predate it by a millennium. The Jewish community of Worms was established by the late tenth century, and the oldest tombstone still legible dates from 1076. The last was in 1940. Situated close to the entrance, the gravestones of Meïr of Rothenburg (d 1293) and Alexander ben Solomon Wimpfen (d 1307) are among the most significant sepulchral monuments of the cemetery and are a place of pilgrimage for Jews from all over the world.

    Other areas of Jewish Worms are the former Jewish quarter with the synagogue and its mikvah, or ritual bath, and the Jewish Museum, based in the community’s former Dance and Marriage house, today’s Rashi House, giving the visitor an impression of the history and culture of Jews in Worms.

    Hours: Open daily, except on Jewish holidays: summertime: 8am—8pm, wintertime: 8am to nightfall.

  • Herrnsheim Castle and Gardens
    [ source: Wikimedia ]

    Herrnsheim Castle and Gardens

    Herrnsheim castle, situated in Herrnsheim suburb, goes back to a fortress built in 1460. Remodeled into a baroque castle from 1711 on, it was severely damaged in 1792. The ruins were used to build today’s empire-style castle, and in 1840 further alterations were made. Around 1790, the lord of the castle, Wolfgang Heribert von Dalberg, commissioned one of the foremost landscape gardeners of his time, Friedrich Ludwig Skell, to lay out a park around the castle. Skell made an English landscape garden of it, supplying it with meadows, outlier groves, ponds and an island. The outbuildings of the castle were built in the 18th century, the orangery, now housing a café, in the early 19th century. The castle’s interior design is particularly remarkable. Large part of it is preserved on the ground floor, including wall and ceiling paintings. Rare French wallpapers from the first half of the 19th century feature a panorama of Paris and a scene from the Bosporus (first floor). Another highlight is the library tower.

  • Worms Synagogue
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Worms Synagogue

    The Worms Synagogue, also known as Rashi Shul, is an 11th century synagogue located in Worms, Germany.

    Architecture

    Built at the point when late Romanesque style was fading and Gothic rising, the rectangular prayer hall features a pair of Romanesque columns supporting groin vaults. The windows in the thick stone walls are simple gothic arches. The windows in the adjoining study hall, the so called Rashi Shul, have rounded Romanesque arches. The women’s section of the prayer hall has Romanesque windows in the eastern wall, and gothic windows in the western wall.

  • Jewish Cemetery, Worms
    [ source: Wikipedia ]

    Jewish Cemetery, Worms

    The Jewish Cemetery in Worms or Heiliger Sand, in Worms, Germany, is usually called the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe, although the Jewish burials in the Jewish sections of the Roman catacombs predate it by a millennium. The Jewish community of Worms was established by the early eleventh century, and the oldest tombstone still legible dates from 1058/59. The cemetery was closed in 1911, when a new cemetery was inaugurated. Some family burials continued until the late 1930s. The older part contains still about 1300 tombstones, the newer part (on the wall of the former city fortifications, acquired after 1689, more than 1200. The cemetery is protected and cared for by the city of Worms, the Jewish community of Mainz-Worms and the Landesdenkmalamt of Rhineland-Palatinate. It is being documented and researched since 2005 by the Salomon L. Steinheim-Institute for German-Jewish History at the University of Duisburg-Essen.



What is your insider travel tip for Worms?

Travel Insider Tips for Worms

Worms Overview

Worms is a city in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, on the Rhine River. At the end of 2004, it had 85,829 inhabitants. Established by the Celts who called it Borbetomagus, Worms today remains embattled with the cities Trier (Trier vacation rentals | Trier travel guide) and Cologne (Cologne vacation rentals | Cologne travel guide) over title of Oldest City in Germany. Worms is the only German member in the organization Most Ancient European Towns Network. Today the city is an industrial centre and is famed for the original Liebfrauenstift-Kirchenstück epotoponym for the Liebfraumilch wine. Other industries include chemicals and metal goods. Worms is one of the major sites where the events of the ancient German Nibelungenlied took place. A multimedia Nibelungenmuseum was opened in 2001, and a yearly festival right in front of the Dom, the Cathedral of Worms, attempts to recapture the atmosphere of the pre-Christian period.

Worms' name is of Celtic origin: Borbetomagus meant "settlement in a watery area". This was eventually transformed into the Latin name Vormatia that had been in use since the 6th century. Many fanciful variant names for Worms exist only upon the title pages of books printed when Worms was an early centre of printing: for instance William Tyndale's English translation of the New Testament was printed at Worms in 1526. Worms is located on the west bank of the Rhine River in between the cities of Ludwigshafen (Ludwigshafen vacation rentals | Ludwigshafen travel guide) and Mainz (Mainz vacation rentals | Mainz travel guide). On the northern edge of town is where the tributary Pfrimm empties into the Rhine and on the southern edge of the city the tributary known as Eisbach or Ice Stream in English, flows into the Rhine. The climate in the Rhine River Valley is very temperate in the winter time and quite enjoyable in the summertime. Rainfall is below average for the surrounding areas. Snow accumulation in the winter is very low and often melts within a short period of time.

Things to See in Worms

  • Romanesque cathedral, one of Germany's three imperial cathedrals on the Rhine (together with those in Mainz (Mainz vacation rentals | Mainz travel guide) and Speyer), dating back to 600 AD.
  • Listen the mythical story of Worms in Nibelungen museum Jewish Bath, Jewish Cemetery ("Heiliger Sand" - Holy Sand)
  • River Banks with restaurants
  • Nice historic Rhine bridge
  • The monument to Martin Luther and other church reformers.
  • Luther Monument
  • City Walls
  • The Park and the manor-house in Herrnsheim. The park was created by Friedrich Ludwig Sckell, who designed the Englischer Garten in Munich (Munich vacation rentals | Munich travel guide) as well.

Things to Do

Cross the Rhine bridge for a walk through the green eastern banks. You can bathe in the Rhine, too! The water quality is very good, now, there are even salmon back!

[ source: Wikitravel ]

More about the History of Worms

The city has existed since before Roman times, when it was captured and fortified by the Romans under Drusus in 14 BC. From that time, a small troop of infantry and cavalry were garrisoned in Augusta Vangionum; this gave the settlement its Romanized but originally Celtic name Borbetomagus. The garrison developed into a small town with the regularized Roman street plan, a forum, and temples for the main gods Jupiter, Juno, Minerva (upon whose temple, as is usual, was built the cathedral) and Mars. Worms was heavily bombed by the Royal Air Force during the last few months of World War II — in two attacks, on Feb. 21 and March 18, 1945. A post-war survey estimated that 39 per cent of the town's developed area was destroyed. The RAF attack on Feb. 21 was aimed at the main train station, on the edge of the inner city, and at chemical plants southwest of the inner city. The attack, however, also destroyed large areas of the city center. The attack was carried out by 334 bombers that in a few minutes rained 1,100 tons of bombs on the inner city. The Worms Cathedral was among the buildings set afire in the resulting conflagration. In the attacks, 239 inhabitants were killed and 35,000 (60 percent of the population of 58,000) were rendered homeless. A total of 6,490 buildings were severely damaged or destroyed. After the war, the inner city was rebuilt, mostly in modern style. Postwar, Worms became part of the new state of Rhineland-Palatinate; the borough Rosengarten (Rosengarten vacation rentals | Rosengarten travel guide), on the east bank of the Rhine, was lost to Hesse.

[ source: wikipedia ]

Worms is a city in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, on the Rhine River. At the end of 2004, it had 85,829 inhabitants. Established by the Celts who called it Borbetomagus, Worms today remains embattled with the cities Trier and Cologne over title of "Oldest City in Germany". Worms is the only German member in the organization Most Ancient European Towns Network. Today the city is an industrial centre and is famed for the original "Liebfrauenstift-Kirchenstück" epotoponym for the Liebfraumilch wine. Other industries include chemicals and metal goods. Worms is one of the major sites where the events of the ancient German Nibelungenlied took place. A multimedia Nibelungenmuseum was opened in 2001, and a yearly festival right in front of the Dom, the Cathedral of Worms, attempts to recapture the atmosphere of the pre-Christian period.

Where to stay in Worms?

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